Benlog

crypto and public policy

Archive for June, 2005

A Platform of Trust for Email

Posted: Wednesday, June 29th, 2005 @ 10:03 pm in Security & Crypto | Comments Off

So, it’s time I begin describing the work my research team (Susan Hohenberger, Ronald L. Rivest, and myself) has been doing to fight phishing attacks (and maybe even spam). Over the next few posts, I’ll describe the building blocks, and eventually piece them together into a solution. Feel free to ask questions in comments or […]

Boycott for Science

Posted: Tuesday, June 28th, 2005 @ 6:56 pm in General | Comments Off

I’m a sucker for a good action flick. Actually, I’m a sucker for any action flick, really, provided it offers a better-than-horrendous plotline. So I’ve been somewhat excited about War of the Worlds, the Steven Spielberg movie starring Tom Cruise. Except now I think I should boycott the movie because of Tom Cruise. Let me […]

Creative Commons is Kicking Butt

Posted: Sunday, June 26th, 2005 @ 2:03 am in Policy | Comments Off

I attended Creative Commons’s iCommons summit today (photographic proof). As I watched the presentations, looked around at the more than 80 representatives from the 70 countries that are now taking part in Creative Commons, I realized a simple fact that has snuck up on me: Creative Commons is kicking some serious butt. There are now […]

Bad Solutions to the Spam & Phishing Problem

Posted: Thursday, June 23rd, 2005 @ 11:36 am in General | Comments Off

Microsoft is sick of spam, and Bill Gates has declared that spam must end by 2006, so they’ve decided to unilaterally implement their Sender ID approach at Hotmail. What that means is that, if your domain hasn’t adopted Sender ID, Hotmail users will never receive email you send them. Sender ID is a simple and […]

More Shame

Posted: Saturday, June 18th, 2005 @ 11:22 pm in General | Comments Off

Republicans are trying to overrule the courts once again, but this time in the most disgusting way possible: by taking away their funding. You heard that right. They don’t like the decision, so they are actively taking away the courts’ enforcement money. There is a way for Congress to override the courts. It’s called a […]

Medicine Should Not be a Political Tool

Posted: Friday, June 17th, 2005 @ 8:56 pm in General | Comments Off

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist’s web site says he is board-certified doctor (specifically, a surgeon). Indeed, he is, with an active certification due for renewal before February 28th, 2006. One should note the following facts about this actively certified physician, especially when taking into account Tennessee’s General Rules and Regulations Governing the Practice of Medicine […]

Shame

Posted: Thursday, June 16th, 2005 @ 12:02 pm in Policy | Comments Off

Below, an FBI report about Guantanamo cited by courageous Senator ChrisDick Durbin. Every freedom-loving American should be outraged and ashamed that this stuff is happening in our name: On a couple of occasions, I entered interview rooms to find a detainee chained hand and foot in a fetal position to the floor, with no chair, […]

Stop Global Warming

Posted: Tuesday, June 14th, 2005 @ 7:07 pm in Policy | Comments Off

Global warming is real. Science should not be manipulated by partisan hackery. More on this later, but in the meantime, sign up to the Virtual March on Washington to Stop Global Warming.

Lightweight Encryption for Email

Posted: Friday, June 10th, 2005 @ 1:21 pm in Publications & Press | Comments Off

In a month, I’ll be presenting at Usenix’s Steps to Reducing Unwanted Traffic on the Internet workshop. The paper is “Lightweight Encryption for Email” (PDF), and my co-authors are Susan Hohenberger and Ronald L. Rivest. At a high-level, we’ve designed (and prototyped) a mechanism for doing public-key signatures and encryption in the context of email, […]

A little more bread to finish the cheese….

Posted: Friday, June 10th, 2005 @ 12:58 pm in Policy | 1 Comment »

There is a classic French tale about a man eating his bread and cheese, and finding that he finishes the bread before the cheese. “Un peu de pain pour finir mon fromage,” he asks. And later, “un peu de fromage pour finir mon pain.” And later again “un peu de pain pour finir mon fromage….” […]