Measles Can Kill, And It’s Spreading. Sue Parents Who Didn’t Vaccinate? Absolutely.

A new piece in Forbes on suing parents who don’t vaccinate, by Dan Diamond:

I heard it over dinner at a friend’s house. I talked about it on a call with a scientist. I discussed it while waiting for public health officials to issue an update on the measles outbreak.

The same murmured question, the same growing fear.

What happens if a child dies because some parents decided not to vaccinate their own kid?

What happens if it’s my child?

Thankfully, it’s still a hypothetical. But there’s reason to worry: More than 100 people in six states are now sick with the measles, in an outbreak that can be traced directly back to Disneyland. Dozens of newborns have been put into isolation.

Continue reading

Tomorrow: 3rd Annual Health Law Year in P/Review

P-Review_2015_poster_with_borderJanuary 30, 2015 7:45 AM – 5:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East AB
1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Please join us for the Third Annual Health Law Year in P/Review symposium, with leading experts discussing major developments during 2014 and what to watch out for in 2015. The discussion at this day long event will cover hot topics in such areas as health insurance, health care systems, public health, innovation, and other issues facing clinicians and patients.

The full agenda with speakers is available on our website.

Attendance is free and open to the public, but space is limited and registration is required. Please register here. Contact petrie-flom@law.harvard.edu with questions.

Tomorrow (1/29): A “Natural” Experiment: Consumer Confusion and Food Claims, a lecture by Efthimios Parasidis

A “Natural” Experiment: Consumer Confusion and Food Claims, a lecture by Efthimios Parasidis

Thursday, January 29, 2015, 12: 00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West B                               Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA [Map]

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Efthimios Parasidis is Associate Professor at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law and holds a joint appointment with the College of Public Health. He is an inaugural member of College of Medicine’s Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities. His scholarship focuses on the regulation of medical products and human subjects research, the interplay between health law and intellectual property, and the application of health information technology to public health policy. He has published in leading law reviews and health policy journals, is co-authoring a casebook, and has a book under contract with Oxford University Press. The Greenwall Foundation awarded Professor Parasidis a Faculty Scholar in Bioethics fellowship for 2014-2017.

The lecture will be followed by an audience question and answer session moderated by Jacob Gersen, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and Director of the Food Law Lab.

Cosponsored by the Food Law Lab and the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic at Harvard Law School.

Global Health Impact and Access to Essential Medicines

By Nicole Hassoun, The Global Health Impact Project

Ebola is ravaging parts of Africa, yet it is not the worst health problem facing people in the region. Millions more are infected with and die every year from diseases like malaria, TB, and HIV/AIDS because they cannot access the essential medicines they need. To change this, we need to understand where we are succeeding in combating these diseases, and where we need to focus our efforts. Until now, this information has been sorely lacking.

Fortunately, the beta for a new Global Health Impact index has just launched that can help us address the access to medicines problem (check out: global-health-impact.org). Using the index, you can see the impact of the drugs for HIV, malaria, and TB in each country in the world. You can also get a sense for the overall impact we are having on the different diseases in the model. Finally, one can see drugs’ impacts by originator company. Continue reading

Last Year Was A Wild One For Health Law — What’s On The Docket For 2015?

A new blog post by Greg Curfman, Holly Fernandez Lynch and I. Glenn Cohen on the Health Affairs Blog:

Everywhere we look, we see the tremendous impact of new legal developments—whether regulatory or statutory, federal or state—on health and health care. These topics range from insurance to intellectual property to religion to professionalism to civil rights. They remain among the most important questions facing Americans today.

This post is the first in a series that will stem from the Third Annual Health Law Year in P/Review event to be held at Harvard Law School on Friday, January 30, 2015. The conference, which is free and open to the public, brings together leading experts to review major developments in health law over the previous year, and preview what is to come.

Read the full post here, and register for the Third Annual Health Law Year in P/Review for free here.

Next Friday (1/30): Third Annual Health Law Year in P/Review

P-Review_2015_poster_with_borderJanuary 30, 2015 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East AB
1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Please join us for the Third Annual Health Law Year in P/Review symposium, with leading experts discussing major developments during 2014 and what to watch out for in 2015. The discussion at this day long event will cover hot topics in such areas as health insurance, health care systems, public health, innovation, and other issues facing clinicians and patients.

The full agenda with speakers is available on our website.

Attendance is free and open to the public, but space is limited and registration is required. Please register here. Contact petrie-flom@law.harvard.edu with questions.

Upcoming Event (1/29): A “Natural” Experiment: Consumer Confusion and Food Claims, a lecture by Efthimios Parasidis

A “Natural” Experiment: Consumer Confusion and Food Claims, a lecture by Efthimios Parasidis

Thursday, January 29, 2015, 12: 00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West B                               Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA [Map]

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Efthimios Parasidis is Associate Professor at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law and holds a joint appointment with the College of Public Health. He is an inaugural member of College of Medicine’s Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities. His scholarship focuses on the regulation of medical products and human subjects research, the interplay between health law and intellectual property, and the application of health information technology to public health policy. He has published in leading law reviews and health policy journals, is co-authoring a casebook, and has a book under contract with Oxford University Press. The Greenwall Foundation awarded Professor Parasidis a Faculty Scholar in Bioethics fellowship for 2014-2017.

The lecture will be followed by an audience question and answer session moderated by Jacob Gersen, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and Director of the Food Law Lab.

Cosponsored by the Food Law Lab and the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic at Harvard Law School.

Art Caplan: A Minor Can’t Refuse Chemotherapy

A new piece by Art Caplan on why he believes a minor can’t say no to chemotherapy, on NBC News:

A 17-year-old girl, listed in court papers only as Cassandra C., is in protective custody at a Connecticut hospital where she is being forced to undergo chemotherapy treatment that she says she does not want. Americans strongly value the right to refuse medical care.

We are all familiar with situations in which Jehovah’s Witnesses say no to life-saving blood transfusions, patients refuse any more surgery or artificial ventilation, and ill people forgo proven medical interventions to follow alternative care.

But those cases involve competent adults.

Cassandra is 17 — still a minor. Should she have the right to say no? I don’t think so.

Continue reading

Check out the latest news from the Petrie-Flom Center!

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Happy New Year! Check out the January 9th edition of the Petrie-Flom Center’s biweekly e-newsletter for the latest on events, affiliate news and scholarship, and job and fellowship opportunities in health law policy and bioethics.

Featured in this edition:

Harvard Law School 2013-05-03 Petrie-Flom Center Food ConferenceOutbreak: Developing New Medical Products for Epidemics, A lecture by Peter Hutt                                Thursday, January 15, 2015, 12:30 PM                         Hauser Hall 102, 1575 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

The recent outbreak of Ebola has called attention to the substantial difficulties associated with developing and testing new products for time-sensitive epidemics. What are the legal, ethical, and economic barriers to getting essential treatments and preventative measures from the lab into the hands of patients – and how can they be overcome?

Please join the Petrie-Flom Center for a discussion of these issues by Peter Barton Hutt, Partner at Covington & Burling, LLP, and Lecturer on Law at HLS. Rachel Sachs, Petrie-Flom Center Academic Fellow, will respond.

For more on news and events at Petrie-Flom, see the full newsletter.

Check out the latest news from the Petrie-Flom Center!

PFC_Banner_DrkBlue

Check out the December 19th edition of the Petrie-Flom Center’s biweekly e-newsletter for the latest on events, affiliate news and scholarship, and job and fellowship opportunities in health law policy and bioethics.

Featured in this edition:

Harvard Law School 2013-05-03 Petrie-Flom Center Food ConferenceOutbreak: Developing New Medical Products for Epidemics, A lecture by Peter Hutt                                                                                                            Thursday, January 15, 2015, 12:30pm                           Hauser Hall 102,                                                   1575 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

The recent outbreak of Ebola has called attention to the substantial difficulties associated with developing and testing new products for time-sensitive epidemics. What are the legal, ethical, and economic barriers to getting essential treatments and preventative measures from the lab into the hands of patients – and how can they be overcome?

Please join the Petrie-Flom Center for a discussion of these issues by Peter Barton Hutt, Partner at Covington & Burling, LLP, and Lecturer on Law at HLS. Rachel Sachs, Petrie-Flom Center Academic Fellow, will respond.

For more on news and events at Petrie-Flom, see the full newsletter.

Art Caplan: Support Nurse Who Resisted Force-Feeding at Guantanamo

Art Caplan has a new piece supporting the nurse who resisted force-feeding at Guantanamo, on NBC News:

Lost in all the talk about the CIA’s history of brutal interrogation tactics after Sept. 11 is this: A real live case involving a U.S. Navy nurse on trial for what he did not do at the notorious Guantanamo prison.

The nurse, in his 18th year in the Navy, volunteered to serve at Guantanamo, where some of those being held prisoner went on hunger strikes. They were following a long tradition going back to the H-Block Irish hunger strikers in Britain who found no other way to protest their internment and prison conditions but to refuse food.

The Navy brass at Gitmo decided that these prisoners were going to eat. They dragged them out of their cells, put them in full body restraints, shoved a tube through their nose and down into their stomachs and force-fed them with artificial food.

Read the full article here.

2015 Edition of the International Compilation of Human Research Standards Released

The 2015 edition of the International Compilation of Human Research Standards has just been released and is available online.

The Compilation features listings of over 1,000 laws, regulations, and guidelines on human subject protections in 113 countries, as well as standards issued by a number of international and regional organizations. Six new countries are included in the 2015 edition: Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, and Sierra Leone.  The 2015 edition also includes hundreds of updates from the previous edition.

The listings are organized into seven categories: Continue reading

Arthur Caplan on Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Art Caplan has a new piece on hyperbaric oxygen therapy over at NBC News:

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Have you ever heard of it? The Internet sure has.

Centers and clinics tout the benefits of sitting in a tank breathing 100 percent oxygen at higher than atmospheric pressure for treating autism, infant brain trauma, multiple sclerosis, chronic fatigue, cerebral palsy and many other conditions.

There’s just one problem: There is no solid evidence that hyperbaric oxygen therapy does anything for any of these disorders.

Read the full article here.

Introducing Joan H. Krause

We are pleased to introduce our newest contributor, Joan H. Krause, to Bill of Health.

Joan Krause PhotoProfessor Joan H. Krause is Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Dan K. Moore Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina School of Law; professor (secondary appointment) in the Department of Social Medicine, UNC School of Medicine; and adjunct professor of health policy and management in the UNC School of Public Health. She previously served as George Butler Research Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Health Law & Policy Institute at the University of Houston Law Center, where she joined the faculty in 2001. From 1997-2001, Professor Krause was a member of the health law faculty at Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Before attending law school, Professor Krause worked as a medical writer/editor in the pharmaceutical industry. After law school, she served as a law clerk for the Honorable Dorothy W. Nelson of the United States Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit. Following her clerkship, Professor Krause was an associate in the Health Practice Group of Hogan & Hartson in Washington, D.C., where her work focused on regulatory and administrative health care matters with an emphasis on health care fraud and abuse. She teaches a variety of health law courses, as well as Criminal Law for first-year students. Her research interests include Health Law, Criminal Law, and Women and the Law. Her co-authored book, HEALTH LAW AND BIOETHICS: CASES IN CONTEXT, was published in 2009.

Professor Krause received her B.A. with Honors in Political Science from Yale University, where she graduated summa cum laude. She received her J.D. with distinction from Stanford Law School, where she was elected to the Order of the Coif and served as Senior Articles Editor of the Stanford Law and Policy Review, as well as a Writer and Copy Editor for the Stanford Law Journal.

Representative Publications:  Continue reading

Clinical Trials Regulation in India

An op-ed from our friends Mark Barnes and Barbara Bierer at Harvard’s Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center on recent legal changes to India’s clinical trial requirements, arguing that using the clinical trial context to promote a social or political policy agenda in India may sacrifice scientific integrity in the service of social justice.  A quick snippet:

The overbreadth of these requirements, and how poorly tailored they are to achieve the specific goal of protecting clinical trial participants from risks directly caused by trials themselves, leaves one wondering whether the regulatory authorities fully comprehend the clinical trial process and the nuances of complex medical and biological processes. One further wonders whether what animates these measures may be less a concern for specific justice in individual cases than the goal of righting social wrongs and achieving social justice, unrelated to but prompted by clinical trial experiences. Achieving social justice and a more just allocation of social resources may be completely laudable – even desirable – as social or political policy, but unconsciously using the clinical trial context to promote this agenda threatens to corrupt science and to undermine health, with results that may create more social distress than social justice.

Read the full piece here.

And more commentary from MRCT on this issue: