bioIP Junior Faculty Workshop: Call for Abstracts by Oct. 1

Call for Abstracts: 2015 bioIP Faculty Workshop

The American Society for Law, Medicine & Ethics (ASLME) is pleased to announce the first annual bioIP Faculty Workshop on May 7, 2015 at Boston University School of Law.

The Workshop will offer a unique opportunity for three junior scholars (in their first decade of teaching) to present their work in progress for in-depth critique and commentary by respected senior scholars in the field.

Topics for the workshop are at the intersection of biotechnology/life sciences/FDA and IP (hence, bioip), broadly defined. A Review Committee will select papers for the Workshop in a blind process. Papers should present an original thesis and contribute to scholarly literature. The Workshop will not review published work.

Scholars with less than ten years of teaching experience interested in having their papers reviewed should submit an abstract (up to 750 words) of the proposed paper (without identifying details) along with a c.v. to Ted Hutchinson, Executive Director of the ASMLE at  thutchinson at aslme.org by Oct 1, 2014. Selected abstracts will be announced later in Fall 2014 with the full draft papers due by April 1, 2015. The organizers will cover reasonable travel and lodging expenses. VAPs and Fellows are eligible for the Workshop.

The Workshop Committee consists of faculty from: The Boston University School of Law; Georgia State University College of Law; Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law; and the Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

For questions, please email Kevin Outterson,   Posted in Biotechnology, Call for Abstracts, Events, FDA, Intellectual Property, Kevin Outterson | Leave a reply

Call for Submissions: Journal of Law and the Biosciences

JLB coverCall for Submissions: Journal of Law and the Biosciences

Deadline: Rolling.

The Journal of Law and the Biosciences (JLB) is actively soliciting original manuscripts, responses, essays, and book reviews devoted to the examination of issues related to the intersection of law and biosciences, including bioethics, neuroethics, genetics, reproductive technologies, stem cells, enhancement, patent law, and food and drug regulation. JLB welcomes submissions of varying length, with a theoretical, empirical, practical, or policy oriented focus.

JLB is the first fully open access peer-reviewed legal journal focused on the advances at the intersection of law and the biosciences. A co-venture between Duke University, Harvard Law School, and Stanford University, and published by Oxford University Press, this open access, online, and interdisciplinary academic journal publishes cutting-edge scholarship in this important new field. JLB is published as one volume with three issues per year with new articles posted online on an ongoing basis.

For more information about JLB, click here. To submit a manuscript, click here.

REGISTRATION OPEN: 9/18 conference on post-trial access

pills_genericvariety_slidePost-Trial Responsibilities: Ethics and Implementation

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East AB, 1585 Massachusetts Ave.

This event is free and open to the public, but due to limited seating registration is required. Please register online.

Law, policy, and guidance are vague, sometimes conflicting, and generally lacking in concrete solutions for questions regarding post-trial responsibilities. The issues are complex and demand thoughtful discourse to move the clinical trial enterprise towards meaningful solutions.  Areas that currently lack clarity include:

  • What types of interventions or resources should be included within post-trial responsibilities?
  • What is a reasonable duration for post-trial responsibilities to extend?
  • What is the mission and purpose of various stakeholders in the conduct of clinical research and how do these roles intersect with post-trial access responsibilities?

This conference will bring together diverse stakeholders to address and develop consensus around some of these questions.

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Journal of Law & Biosciences publishes HLS student work

JLB coverThe Journal of Law and the Biosciences, the new open-access journal launched this year by the Petrie-Flom Center and Harvard Law School in partnership with Duke University and Stanford University, has published several articles in recent weeks by Harvard Law School students:

Check out these articles, and learn more about the Journal of Law and the Biosciences!

Chip and Fish: Inadvertent Spies

Art Caplan has authored a new opinion piece on Bioethics.net on the issue of “chipping” human beings. From the piece:

There has been a great deal of fingerpointing, second-guessing and recrimination over the decision by the President to exchange five former Taliban leaders for the American soldier, Bowe Bergdahl.  “You’ve just released five extremely dangerous people, who in my opinion … will rejoin the battlefield,” Senator Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and likely Presidential candidate told Fox News.  Senator John McCain, R-AZ, told ABC news and many other outlets that he would never have supported the swap if he’d known exactly which prisoners would be exchanged given their former high roles in battling the U.S. in Afghanistan.

Put aside for a second whether the five Taliban leaders that were flown to Qatar for Bergdahl are now too old and too long removed from Taliban affairs to resume anything close to their old roles.  Presume, instead, they will eagerly resume where they left off prior to their capture, attacking Americans and others they see as hindering Taliban goals for Afghanistan.  Is it possible that the U.S. did something to these men before letting them go in the swap—surreptitiously implanting them with microchips so that they could be tracked or traced?

Read the full article.

Bumps on the Road Towards Clinical Trials Data Transparency- A recent U-Turn by the EMA?

By Timo Minssen

In a recent blog I discussed the benefits and potential draw-backs of a new “EU Regulation on clinical trials on medicinal products for human use,” which had been adopted by the European Parliament and Council in April 2014. Parallel to these legislative developments, the drug industry has responded with its own initiatives providing for varying degrees of transparency. But also medical authorities have been very active in developing their transparency policies.

In the US, the FDA proposed new rules which would require disclosure of masked and de-identified patient-level data. In the EU, the EMA organized during 2013 a series of meetings with its five advisory committees to devise a draft policy for proactive publication of and access to clinical-trial data. In June 2013 this process resulted in the publication, of a draft policy document titled “Publication and access to clinical-trial data” (EMA/240810/2013).

Following an invitation for public comments on this document, the EMA received more than 1,000 submissions from stakeholders. Based on these comments the EMA recently proposed “Terms of Use” (TOU) and “Redaction Principles” for clinical trial data disclosure.

In a letter to the EMA’s executive director Dr. Guido Rasi, dated 13 May 2014, the European Ombudsman, Emily O’Reilly, has now expressed concern about what seems to be a substantial shift of policy regarding clinical trial data transparency. Continue reading

See and Share Job and Fellowship Opportunities on the Petrie-Flom Website

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Looking for new opportunities in the fields of health law, policy, and bioethics? Look no further!

This spring, we’ve added a new opportunities section to the resources on the new Petrie-Flom website. This page features opportunities in health law and bioethics including jobs, fellowships, graduate programs, seminars, calls for abstracts and submissions—and more! These opportunities are updated in real time, full posts remain active on the website until their deadline passes, and past posts are visible in our opportunities archive.

If you have opportunities that you would like to share with the Petrie-Flom community via our website and/or our biweekly e-newsletter, please contact us at petrie-flom@law.harvard.edu.

DUE MONDAY, MAY 19: Applications for 2014-2015 Petrie-Flom Student Fellowship

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THE PETRIE-FLOM CENTER

STUDENT FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM, 2014-2015

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

 

The Center and Student Fellowship.  The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics is an interdisciplinary research program at Harvard Law School dedicated to the scholarly research of important issues at the intersection of law and health policy, including issues of health care financing and market regulation, biotechnology and intellectual property, biomedical research, and bioethics. The Student Fellowship Program is designed to support student research in these areas.  For more information on our current fellows and their work, see our website.

Eligibility. The student fellowship program is open to all Harvard graduate students who are committed to undertaking a significant research project and fulfilling other program requirements without exception during the year of their fellowship:  Continue reading

TUESDAY, 5/20 conference: “Biostatistics & FDA Regulation: The Convergence of Science & Law”

Biostatistics and FDA Regulation: The Convergence of Science and Law

Tuesday, May 20, 2014, 8:00am – 5:00pm

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West AB, Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave.

Symposium Presented by the Drug Information Association (DIA), the Food and Drug Law Institute (FDLI), and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School, in collaboration with the Harvard School of Public Health Department of Biostatistics and Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center.

Biostatistics is the application of statistics — the study of the collection, organization, analysis, interpretation and presentation of data — to a wide range of topics in life sciences.  Biostatistics informs the Food and Drug Administration’s regulatory decision-making processes for premarket review of investigational drugs and devices and post-market surveillance of medical products, including decisions to require safety labeling changes and withdraw approval.   Recent developments, such as Congress’s creation of a new federal infrastructure for the dissemination of comparative effectiveness information, point to the need for a fresh look at the way in which biostatistical principles inform federal health care policy, particularly at the FDA.  This one-day symposium will give attendees the foundational knowledge they need to understand how biostatistics applies in FDA regulation, and will also address closely related issues residing at the intersection of statistical analysis and life sciences litigation. The full conference agenda is available on the website.

Registration is required in order to attend this event. Please register here.

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5/20 conference: “Biostatistics & FDA Regulation: The Convergence of Science & Law”

Biostatistics and FDA Regulation: The Convergence of Science and Law

Tuesday, May 20, 2014, 8:00am – 5:00pm

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West AB, Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave.

Symposium Presented by the Drug Information Association (DIA), the Food and Drug Law Institute (FDLI), and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School, in collaboration with the Harvard School of Public Health Department of Biostatistics and Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center.

Biostatistics is the application of statistics — the study of the collection, organization, analysis, interpretation and presentation of data — to a wide range of topics in life sciences.  Biostatistics informs the Food and Drug Administration’s regulatory decision-making processes for premarket review of investigational drugs and devices and post-market surveillance of medical products, including decisions to require safety labeling changes and withdraw approval.   Recent developments, such as Congress’s creation of a new federal infrastructure for the dissemination of comparative effectiveness information, point to the need for a fresh look at the way in which biostatistical principles inform federal health care policy, particularly at the FDA.  This one-day symposium will give attendees the foundational knowledge they need to understand how biostatistics applies in FDA regulation, and will also address closely related issues residing at the intersection of statistical analysis and life sciences litigation. The full conference agenda is available on the website.

Registration is required in order to attend this event. Please register here.

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Review of the FDA Progress on Phasing out Certain Antibiotics: Promise and Problems

Faced with increasing concerns about the misuse and overuse of antibiotics for food animals’ growth enhancement, which has caused serious antimicrobial resistance, FDA finally took actions on December, 2013 by issuing guidelines that ask drug makers to remove the labeling of antibiotics for growth effects on a “voluntary” basis. FDA officials believe the voluntary participation “is the fastest, most efficient way to make these change.”

As the restriction of antibiotics only applies to growth promotion and disease preventive uses are still permitted, critics argued that the new policy will create a loophole and no guarantee for the decrease of antibiotics’ usage by farmers. Further, without giving FDA an authority to require drug companies to release sales data of antibiotics, some said it remains illusory to monitor and verify the actual usage of the drugs.

According to the FDA’s strategy plan, pharmaceutical companies may respond their intention of voluntary compliance within three months after the notice. On March, 2014, FDA announced that 25 of the 26 drug makers affected have agreed to follow the voluntary withdrawal. In effect, food animal producers can only use the companies’ drugs sold in the market for therapy purpose. Indeed, the predominant support by industry signals an encouraging and good starting point for implementing the FDA policy. Nevertheless, it leaves some legal questions unsolved, which may trigger further disputes in the future.

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Summer Course for Professionals in “Pharma Law & Policy” at the University of Copenhagen

Stay abreast with recent developments and trends determining the legal and regulatory framework of the European pharmaceutical industry.

What are the most significant current issues shaking and shaping the pharmaceutical industry today? The business environment and legal framework relevant to the pharmaceutical industry continues to change rapidly in the face of constant challenges posed by competition, politics and technological innovation. Considering the highly lucrative and competitive nature of the industry, it is more important than ever for professionals working with legal and regulatory aspects of drug development to stay abreast of the most recent developments.

This course provides a broad and practical understanding of the ‘hot topics’ and will present and analyse these topics from scientific, legal and policy perspectives.

Further information about the course is available here.

Course content

The course begins with a general overview of the current scientific and legal trends in pharmaceutical R&D, organisation and policy. This is followed by a review of the hot topics through a combination of lectures, discussions, group work and case studies. The course is designed to allow room for the issues and challenges crucial to the participants’ daily work and practice.

Participants

The course is designed for professionals working with legal issues and/or regulatory aspects of drug development, decision-makers, administrators and health care practitioners within both the public and private sectors, e.g.:

  • Legal departments in the pharmaceutical industry.
  • Law firms dealing with patent and competition law in the pharmaceutical industry.
  • Branch organizations in the pharmaceutical sector.
  • Health care professionals and decision makers.
  • Bank and finance consultants working with risk and investment in the pharmaceutical industry.

Credit – especially for lawyers and trainee solicitors

This course meets the Danish requirements for compulsory supplementary training for lawyers and trainee solicitors.

Course dates

5 days, 18 – 22 August 2014, 9:00 – 17:00 at the University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg Campus.

Course director

Timo Minssen, Associate Professor, Dr., LL.M., M.I.C.L., Centre for Information and Innovation Law, Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen

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A More Transparent System for Clinical Trials Data in Europe – Mind the Gaps!

Following the approval of the European Parliament (EP) earlier last month, the Council of the European Union (the Council) adopted on 14 April 2014 a “Regulation on clinical trials on medicinal products for human use” repealing Directive 2001/20/EC.  As described in a press-release, the new law:

“aims to remedy the shortcomings of the existing Clinical Trials Directive by setting up a uniform framework for the authorization of clinical trials by all the member states concerned with a given single assessment outcome. Simplified reporting procedures, and the possibility for the Commission to do checks, are among the law’s key innovations.”

Moreover, and very importantly, the Regulation seeks to improve transparency by requiring pharmaceutical companies and academic researchers to publish the results of all their European clinical trials in a publicly-accessible EU database. In contrast to earlier stipulations which only obliged sponsor to publish the end-results of their clinical trials, the new law requires full clinical study reports to be published after a decision on – or withdrawal of – marketing authorization applications. Sponsors who do not comply with these requirements will face fines.

These groundbreaking changes will enter into force 20 days after publication in the Official Journal of the EU. However, it will first apply six months after a new EU portal for the submission of data on clinical trials and the above mentioned EU database have become fully functional. Since this is expected to take at least two years, the Regulation will apply in 2016 at the earliest (with an opt-out choice available until 2018).

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY: Petrie-Flom Center Annual Conference, “Behavioral Economics, Law, & Health Policy”

Petrie-Flom Center 2014 Annual Conference: Behavioral Economics, Law, and Health Policy

May 2-3, 2014

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC, Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave.

Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein’s book  Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness brought behavioral economics to the masses, beginning a discussion of libertarian paternalism and the many ways that “choice architects” can help nudge people to make better choices for themselves without forcing certain outcomes on anyone. Some of their examples fall in the realm of health policy, as is also the case of Daniel Kahneman’s recent book, Thinking, Fast and Slow, which examines various cognitive errors people make in their judgments, choices, and conclusions, as well as how we might correct them.  But the conversation has only just begun.

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On Patents, Patients and the Public Interest

By Michael Young

Earlier this month, a U.S. District Court in Delaware issued an injunction to bar sales of a minimally invasive Medtronic replacement heart valve that putatively infringed on competitor’s Edwards Lifesciences valve system patent.  After this ruling was issued, Medtronic filed an emergency motion requesting stay and expedited appeal of this injunction, contending that that “if the injunction were permitted to go into effect, treatable patients [with aortic annuli larger than 25mm for whom Edwards' valve is not suited] may unnecessarily die in the name of already expired patent rights. Put simply, the calamity to public health that would result from the injunction is premised on a legally improper extension of patent rights” (Medtronic v. Edwards, 08-CV-0091, 2014).  Shortly thereafter, The Federal Court Circuit of Appeals agreed to postpone the injunction and to expedite Medtronic’s appeal.

While still unraveling, this case offers unique insights into the important yet often overlooked dialectic between patient safety and patent rights.

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Petrie-Flom Intern’s Weekly Round-Up, 4/18-4/25

By Chloe Reichel

This Thursday the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed new regulations for the sale of e-cigarettes. These regulations would prohibit sales to minors and make health warnings on packages mandatory.

This Wednesday a law was passed in Vermont that requires the labeling of genetically modified foods. Vermont is the first state to pass such a regulation.

Estimations for state spending on Medicaid have been reduced by the Congressional Budget Office. The office is now predicting that the cost of Medicaid expansion will be $46 billion, compared with their previous estimate of $70 billion.

Researchers at King’s College London have grown human skin in the lab from stem cells. Animal rights proponents herald these developments as a potential end to testing on animals.

Sovaldi, a medication for hepatitis C that costs $1,000 for one day’s dosage, has had the most successful drug launch ever. From its FDA approval in December to March 31, its manufacturer sold $2.27 billion worth of the drug, though the drug has faced criticism for its high price.

The FDA is considering banning electrical stimulation devices, used to discourage aggressive behavior in people with disabilities. Students from the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center testified against the use of these devices, though some parents of children at the Center and administrators there defend the use of these devices.

Following an audit of Illinois Medicaid expenditures, it was found that the program paid $12 million for medical services for dead people. These findings have led some to support stricter scrutiny in determining Medicaid eligibility.

Pervasive use of pesticides and genetically modified seeds in Hawaii has led to unrest among the state’s residents. Groups have been organizing to prevent the cultivation of genetically modified crops, and in Hawaii County such a law has already been adopted.