TOMORROW: Second Annual Health Law Year in P/Review

Please join us for our second annual Health Law Year in P/Review event, co-sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the New England Journal of Medicine. The conference will be held in Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C at Harvard Law School on Friday, January 31, 2014, from 8:30am to 5:00pm.

This year we will welcome experts discussing major developments over the past year and what to watch out for in areas including the Affordable Care Act, medical malpractice, FDA regulatory policy, abortion, contraception, intellectual property in the life sciences industry, public health policy, and human subjects research.

The full agenda is available on our website. Speakers are:  Continue reading

1/31: Second Annual Health Law Year in P/Review

Please join us for our second annual Health Law Year in P/Review event, co-sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the New England Journal of Medicine. The conference will be held in Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C at Harvard Law School on Friday, January 31, 2014, from 8:30am to 5:00pm.

This year we will welcome experts discussing major developments over the past year and what to watch out for in areas including the Affordable Care Act, medical malpractice, FDA regulatory policy, abortion, contraception, intellectual property in the life sciences industry, public health policy, and human subjects research.

The full agenda is available on our website. Speakers are:  Continue reading

1/31: Second Annual Health Law Year in P/Review conference

Please join us for our second annual Health Law Year in P/Review event, co-sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the New England Journal of Medicine. The conference will be held in Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C at Harvard Law School on Friday, January 31, 2014, from 8:30am to 5:00pm.

This year we will welcome experts discussing major developments over the past year and what to watch out for in areas including the Affordable Care Act, medical malpractice, FDA regulatory policy, abortion, contraception, intellectual property in the life sciences industry, public health policy, and human subjects research.

The full agenda is available on our website. Speakers are:  Continue reading

On Access and Accountability: Two Supreme Court Rulings on Generic Drugs

By Marcia Boumil and Gregory Curfman

In 2013 the U.S. Supreme Court issued two important rulings in cases involving the marketing of generic drugs. In Federal Trade Commission v. Actavis, the Court addressed the law governing a controversial pharmaceutical marketing practice known as reverse payment agreements, or pay for delay – a byproduct of the Hatch-Waxman Act.  This occurs when a generic drug company identifies a vulnerable patent held by a brand-name drug manufacturer and seeks Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for a generic version before the patent expires, provoking a lawsuit by the brand-name company for alleged infringement. A subsequent settlement involves the brand-name company paying the generic company to delay commercialization of its product (but not beyond the expiration of the patent). The FDA alleged that reverse payment agreements violate antitrust laws. The Supreme Court held that their validity would be evaluated on a case-by-case basis using the “rule of reason” standard. According to this standard, only those agreements that restrain trade will be viewed as violations of anti-trust law.

In the second case, Mutual Pharmaceutical v. Bartlett, the Court affirmed its 2011 ruling in Mensing v. PLIVA and held that generics manufacturers are substantially immune from civil claims regarding injuries caused by their products whether the tort claim be based upon failure to warn (Mensing) or design defect (Bartlett). The basis of the decision resides in the FDA requirement that generic drug labels be consistent with the label of the brand-name equivalent. Just days after the Bartlett decision issued, the FDA indicated its intent to propose a revision to the labeling requirements for generic drugs to create parity with branded drugs. If adopted, this revision could vitiate the law set forth in Mensing and Bartlett.

For more coverage of these cases, see the New England Journal of Medicine essay here.

 

Health Law Year in P/Review Video

If you couldn’t make it to our inaugural session on Health Law Year in P/Review, co-hosted by the Petrie-Flom Center and the New England Journal of Medicine, you’re in luck!  You can watch the video here:

http://www.law.harvard.edu/media/2013/02/01_pf.mov

Topics and speakers included:

The ACA and Health Care Reform

Contraceptives Coverage and Personhood Amendments

Immigrants’ Access to Health Care

Affirmative Action and Medical School Admissions

Gene Patenting

Tobacco and Obesity Policy and the First Amendment

Summary and Wrap Up

Closing Remarks from Dean Martha Minow