Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Not Just Any Week in Privacy

By Nicolas Terry

Privacy is never easy to think about. This week it became harder. Two pieces framed my week. First, Eben Moglen’s essay in The Guardian (based on his Columbia talks from late last year) took my breath away; glorious writing and stunning breadth combined to deliver a desperately sad (but not entirely hopeless) message about government and corporate overreaching in data collection and processing.

A wry speech posted by software developer Maciej Ceglowski also helped frame my thoughts. He wrote, “The Internet somehow contrives to remember too much and too little at the same time, and it maps poorly on our concepts of how memory should work.” There’s the problem in a nut. Ceglowski alludes to the divide between how human (offline) memory operates (it’s “fuzzy” and “memories tend to fade with time, and we remember only the more salient events”) and the online default of remembering everything. Government and Google and, for that matter, Big Data Brokers tell us that online rules now apply across the board and ‘that’s just peachy’ because we’ll have better national security, better searches, or more relevant advertising. But, that’s backwards. Continue reading

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

A Bad Debt That Will Shake Big Data

By Nicolas Terry

A resident of Spain allegedly owed back taxes triggering attachment proceedings. The local newspaper published the details of an upcoming auction of his property in early 1998. At some point the issue was settled. However, the matter was not forgotten—the newspaper was online and a Google search of the gentleman’s name returned this history. He complained to the Spanish data protection agency (AEPD) that he had a right to have older, irrelevant information erased and that Google should remove the links. The AEPD agreed and Google sued for relief. The Spanish High Court referred the interpretation of the Data Directive (95/46) to the European Court of Justice in 2010 and in 2013 the Advocate-General issued an advisory opinion supportive of Google’s position. Somewhat surprisingly the European Court of Justice has now taken the opposite view (Case C‑131/12, Google Spain SL v. AEPD, May 13, 2014). Continue reading

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Repealing the ACA. Will the debate ever end?

Last week the President celebrated the enrollment of 7.1 million Americans in health insurance with the words “The debate over repealing this law is over… The Affordable Care Act is here to stay,” here. Indeed, as the number of insured under the Act has grown, Medicaid has gained another 3 million enrollees, here, and other ACA provisions have kicked in so the conventional wisdom has emerged that while a political turn in favor of Republicans would lead to some important “tweaks,” the so-called “popular parts” such as guaranteed issue would survive. This world view seemed confirmed when Senators Burr, Coburn and Hatch introduced the first true Republican alternative to the ACA, here. Tim Jost commended that effort for going beyond the rhetoric of repeal noting, here, “Republicans seem to be coming to terms with the fact that the ACA has permanently changed the health policy landscape.” However, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan seems to be having none of this suggesting, here, that total reform remains the objective and that “We can have in this country universal access to affordable health insurance for everybody, including people with preexisting conditions without a costly government takeover of one-sixth of our economy.” It’s going to be a long election season.

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

 

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

The AOL Babies: Our Healthcare Crisis in a Nut

By Nicolas Terry

Cross-posted from HealthLawProf Blog.
Where does one start with AOL CEO Armstrong’s ridiculous and unfeeling justifications for changes in his company’s 401(k) plan. Cable TV and Twitter came out of the blocks fast with the obvious critiques. And the outrage only increased after novelist Deanna Fei took to Slate to identify her daughter as one of the subjects of Armstrong’s implied criticism. Armstrong has now apologized and reversed his earlier decision.
As the corporate spin doctors contain the damage, Armstrong’s statements likely will recede from memory, although I am still hoping The Onion will memorialize Armstrong’s entry into the healthcare debate (suggested headline, “CEO Discovers Nation’s Healthcare Crisis Caused by 25 Ounce Baby”). But supposing (just supposing) your health law students ask about the story in class this week. What sort of journey can you take them on?

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Big Week for Big Data

By Nicolas Terry

For privacy advocates the last week contained something of a gut-check when the UK’s splendidly descriptive Health and Social Care Information Centre announced something of a bonanza for big data companies; the NHS’s care.data program, here, will make anonymized clinical data broadly available to researchers and commercial interests with few limitations, here.

For once, however, the US attitude to the growing big data phenomenon has appeared more robust. Writing on the White House Blog, here, Presidential counselor John Podesta announced he will be leading “a comprehensive review of the way that ‘big data’ will affect the way we live and work; the relationship between government and citizens; and how public and private sectors can spur innovation and maximize the opportunities and free flow of this information while minimizing the risks to privacy.” Results are promised in 90 days.

For health lawyers, however, the most interesting recent development has been the FTC’s denial of LabMD’s motion to dismiss, here. The LabMD complaint involves the data security practices of a clinical testing laboratory. The FTC alleged “unfair . . . acts or practices” under Section 5(a)(1) of the FTC Act. One of LabMD’s arguments for dismissal was that the specific HIPAA and HITECH statutes dealing with the health privacy and security obligations of covered entities blocked the FTC from enforcing its more general authority. According to the FTC:

Nothing in HIPAA, HITECH… reflects a “clear and manifest” intent of Congress to restrict the Commission’s authority over allegedly “unfair” data security practices such as those at issue in this case. LabMD identifies no provision that creates a “clear repugnancy” with the FTC Act, nor any requirement in HIPAA or HITECH that is “clearly incompatible” with LabMD’s obligations under Section 5.

LabMD is an important development. I have argued at length, here, that big data activities outside of HIPAA-protected space have illustrated the gaps in data protection because of the manner in which the US has regulated discrete vertical industries. LabMD suggests that the FTC is prepared to fill in the gaps.