FREE REGISTRATION! Families Matter: Ethically, Legally, and Clinically

Families Matter: Ethically, Legally, and Clinically

child_pediatrician_slide_270_200_85_c1March 18 – 20, 2015

Harvard Medical School
Joseph B. Martin Conference Center
77 Avenue Louis Pasteur
Boston, MA 02115

A full agenda is available on our website.

We often talk, in bioethics, about individual autonomy.  Yet our most challenging ethical, legal and clinical controversies in health care often center around family roles and responsibilities: How should we handle parents’ refusals of medically recommended treatment or, conversely, parents’ requests to medicate or surgically alter their children?  What should be known, and by whom, about a child’s genome, especially when genetic information effects other family members?  What weight should be given to family interests in decisions about a child’s health care?  How should we think about 3-parent embryos? Gamete donors? Gestational mothers? What rights and responsibilities should fathers have with regard to decisions about abortion and adoption, for example, as well as health care decisions for their offspring?  Health care decisions might be messier, but maybe they would also be better if we gave more attention to family matters, and how families matter.

This multidisciplinary program has been developed to inform and deliberate with ethicists, health care providers, attorneys and the public about changes in conceptions of the family and medical technologies and practices that challenge moral conventions and contemporary law.  Faculty experts and participants will engage in thoughtful discussion regarding a broad range of ethical and legal issues that arise from new ways of creating and new ways of understanding families and providing health care for expectant parents, growing fetuses, infants, children, adolescents….and their families.

Co-sponsored with the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund.

BOOK LAUNCH (3/11): Identified versus Statistical Lives: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Book Launch: Identified versus Statistical Lives: An Interdisciplinary Approach

March 11, 2015 12:00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, Room 2012 Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Identified versus Statistical Lives: An Interdisciplinary Approach is an edited volume that grew out of the 2012 conference “Identified versus Statistical Lives: Ethics and Public Policy,” cosponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, and the Harvard Global Health Institute. The essays address the identified lives effect, which describes the fact that people demonstrate a stronger inclination to assist persons and groups identified as at high risk of great harm than those who will or already suffer similar harm, but endure unidentified. As a result of this effect, we allocate resources reactively rather than proactively, prioritizing treatment over prevention. Such bias raises practical and ethical questions that extend to almost every aspect of human life and politics.

The book talk and discussion will feature:

  • I. Glenn Cohen, co-editor, Petrie-Flom Faculty Director, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School
  • Norman Daniels, co-editor, Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health, Harvard School of Public Health
  • Nir Eyal, co-editor, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine (Medical Ethics), Harvard Medical School

Co-sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library, with support from the Harvard Global Health Institute.

NEW DATE (3/9): Gender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

genderreassignment_slideGender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

Monday, March 9, 2015 12:00 PM

Pound Hall, Room 102, Harvard Law School, 1563 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Trans and intersex individuals face a series of legal, medical, and social challenges. This panel explores these overlapping issues, including: healthcare coverage of treatments such as gender reassignment therapy, the legal recognition of trans identities, intersexuality, and asexuality.  Join us for a wide-ranging panel discussion.

Panelists include:

  • Noa Ben-Asher, Visiting Associate Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
  • Elizabeth F. Emens, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Columbia Law School
  • Gerald L. Neuman, J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law, Harvard Law School
  • Matthew J.B. Lawrence, Academic Fellow, Petrie-Flom Center
  • Moderator: I. Glenn Cohen, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and Lambda at Harvard Law School.

TOMORROW: Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics

Cohen_Medical_Tourism_slidePatients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics
I. Glenn Cohen and Dr. Robert Klitzman

Tuesday, February 24, 5:30 – 7:00 PM ET

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

Merrill House 170 East 64th Street, New York, NY 10065-7478

Live Video Stream HERE

 

Medical tourism is a growing, multi-billion dollar industry involving millions of patients who travel abroad each year to get health care.

Some seek services like hip replacements and travel to avoid queues, save money, or because their insurer has given them an incentive to do so. Others seek to circumvent prohibitions on accessing services at home and go abroad to receive abortions, assisted suicide, commercial surrogacy, or experimental stem cell treatments.

How safe are these procedures? How do you ensure that you will be protected if anything should happen?

I. Glenn Cohen is professor of law at Harvard Law School and director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics. He is the author of Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics.

Dr. Robert Klitzman will lead the conversation. He is a professor of psychiatry in the College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Joseph Mailman School of Public Health and the director of the Masters of Bioethics Program at Columbia University.

This event is part of Carnegie Council’s Global Health Series.

Check out the latest news from the Petrie-Flom Center!

PFC_Banner_DrkBlueCheck out the February 20th edition of the Petrie-Flom Center’s biweekly e-newsletter for the latest on events, affiliate news and scholarship, and job and fellowship opportunities in health law policy and bioethics.

Featured in this edition:

child_pediatrician_slide_270_200_85_c1FREE REGISTRATION!
Families Matter: Ethically, Legally, and Clinically

March 18 – 20, 2015
Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA

We often talk, in bioethics, about individual autonomy.  Yet our most challenging ethical, legal and clinical controversies in health care often center around family roles and responsibilities: How should we handle parents’ refusals of medically recommended treatment or, conversely, parents’ requests to medicate or surgically alter their children?  What should be known, and by whom, about a child’s genome, especially when genetic information effects other family members?  What weight should be given to family interests in decisions about a child’s health care?  How should we think about 3-parent embryos? Gamete donors? Gestational mothers? What rights and responsibilities should fathers have with regard to decisions about abortion and adoption, for example, as well as health care decisions for their offspring?  Health care decisions might be messier, but maybe they would also be better if we gave more attention to family matters, and how families matter. Continue reading

AGENDA NOW AVAILABLE! 2015 Annual Conference: Law, Religion, and Health in America

2015 Annual Conference – Law, Religion, and Health in America

stethoscope_bible_slideMay 8 – 9, 2015

Milstein East BC
Harvard Law School
1585 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138 [Map]

Religion and medicine have historically gone hand in hand, but increasingly have come into conflict in the U.S. as health care has become both more secular and more heavily regulated.  Law has a dual role here, simultaneously generating conflict between religion and health care, for example through new coverage mandates or legally permissible medical interventions that violate religious norms, while also acting as a tool for religious accommodation and protection of conscience.

This conference, and anticipated edited volume, will aim to: (1) identify the various ways in which law intersects with religion and health care in the United States; (2) understand the role of law in creating or mediating conflict between religion and health care; and (3) explore potential legal solutions to allow religion and health care to simultaneously flourish in a culturally diverse nation.

Special sessions include:

  • Thursday, May 7, pre-conference session on the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision
  • Friday, May 8, Keynote: Douglas Laycock, University of Virginia School of Law - Religious Liberty, Health Care, and the Culture Wars
  • Saturday, May 9, Plenary Session: Adèle Keim, The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, and Gregory Lipper, Americans United for Separation of Church and State – The Contraceptives Coverage Mandate Litigation

 A full agenda is now available on our website

The conference is free and open to the public, but space is limited and registration is required. REGISTER ONLINE.

Pre-conference session co-sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center and the Ambassador John L. Loeb Initiative on Religious Freedom and Its Implications at the Harvard Kennedy School Center for American Political Studies.

The full conference is supported by the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund.

EVENT NEXT WEEK (2/25): Measles, Vaccines, and Protecting Public Health

15.02.25, measles posterMeasles, Vaccines, and Protecting Public Health

Wednesday, February 25, 2015, 4:00 PM 

Wasserstein Hall, Room 1010 Harvard Law School 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

The recent measles outbreak centered around Disneyland in California has reignited the contentious debate over childhood vaccination in the United States. Join us for a discussion of the ethical, legal, and public health issues surrounding vaccines, including mandates, exemptions, parental rights, and the role of misinformation in modern medicine.

Panelists:

  • George Annas, Boston University School of Public Health, School of Medicine, and School of Law
  • Nir Eyal, Harvard Medical School
  • Dyann Wirth, Harvard School of Public Health
  • Moderator: Ahmed Ragab, Harvard Divinity School

This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Tomorrow (2/12): A Dialogue on Agency, Responsibility, and the Brain with Stephen Morse

MorseA Dialogue on Agency, Responsibility, and the Brain with Stephen Morse

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 12:00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, 3019                       Harvard Law School                                       1585 Massachusetts Avenue                     Cambridge, MA 02138 [Map]

Join guest speaker Professor Stephen J. Morse, JD, PhD, former MacArthur Foundation Law & Neuroscience Project co-Chair and co-Director of the Center for Neuroscience and Society and CLBB Faculty members Judge Nancy A. Gertner and Professor Amanda C. Pustilnik for a conversation about how – or whether – new knowledge about the brain is changing legal concepts of agency and responsibility.

Stephen J. Morse is the Ferdinand Wakeman Hubbell Professor of Law; Professor of Psychology and Law in Psychiatry; and Associate Director, Center for Neuroscience & Society at the University of Pennsylvania. Morse works on problems of individual responsibility and agency. Morse was Co-Director of the MacArthur Foundation Law and Neuroscience Project. Morse is a Diplomate in Forensic Psychology of the American Board of Professional Psychology; a past president of Division 41 of the American Psychological Association; a recipient of the American Academy of Forensic Psychology’s Distinguished Contribution Award; a member of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Mental Health and Law; and a trustee of the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law.

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience.

CANCELED: Gender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues – TO BE RESCHEDULED

Update: Monday, February 9, 2015, 8:15pm: Due to severe winter weather Harvard Law School is closed on Tuesday, February 10. This event is canceled, but will be rescheduled for a later date. Check back here or sign up for our newsletter for updates!

genderreassignment_slideGender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

Trans and intersex individuals face a series of legal, medical, and social challenges. This panel explores these overlapping issues, including: healthcare coverage of treatments such as gender reassignment therapy, the legal recognition of trans identities, intersexuality, and asexuality.  Join us for a wide-ranging panel discussion.

Panelists include:

  • Noa Ben-Asher, Visiting Associate Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
  • Elizabeth F. Emens, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Columbia Law School
  • Gerald L. Neuman, J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law, Harvard Law School
  • Matthew J.B. Lawrence, Academic Fellow, Petrie-Flom Center
  • Moderator: I. Glenn Cohen, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and Lambda at Harvard Law School.

Tomorrow (2/5): A Right to Health? A Lecture by John Tasioulas

tasioulasA Right to Health? A lecture by John Tasioulas

Thursday, February 5, 2015 12:00 PM    

Wasserstein Hall, Room 3019
Harvard Law School
1589 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA

There have been recent calls to establish a framework convention on health grounded in the human right to health. But is there really a human right to health? If there is, what does it entitle us to, and how do we decide? This lecture by John Tasioulas will offer new answers to these questions, and will further argue that global health policy has to be responsive to all human rights, not just the right to health, and that we must address more than human rights in order to create effective global health policy.  Response by I. Glenn Cohen.

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School.

NEXT WEEK: 2/10, Gender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

genderreassignment_slideGender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

Tuesday, February 10, 2015 12:00 PM

Pound Hall, Room 102, Harvard Law School, 1563 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Trans and intersex individuals face a series of legal, medical, and social challenges. This panel explores these overlapping issues, including: healthcare coverage of treatments such as gender reassignment therapy, the legal recognition of trans identities, intersexuality, and asexuality.  Join us for a wide-ranging panel discussion.

Panelists include:

  • Noa Ben-Asher, Visiting Associate Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
  • Elizabeth F. Emens, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Columbia Law School
  • Gerald L. Neuman, J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law, Harvard Law School
  • Matthew J.B. Lawrence, Academic Fellow, Petrie-Flom Center
  • Moderator: I. Glenn Cohen, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and Lambda at Harvard Law School.

THIS WEEK: 2/5, A Right to Health? A lecture by John Tasioulas

tasioulasA Right to Health? A lecture by John Tasioulas

Thursday, February 5, 2015 12:00 PM    

Wasserstein Hall, Room 3019
Harvard Law School
1589 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA

There have been recent calls to establish a framework convention on health grounded in the human right to health. But is there really a human right to health? If there is, what does it entitle us to, and how do we decide? This lecture by John Tasioulas will offer new answers to these questions, and will further argue that global health policy has to be responsive to all human rights, not just the right to health, and that we must address more than human rights in order to create effective global health policy.  Response by I. Glenn Cohen.

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School.

Upcoming Event (2/12): A Dialogue on Agency, Responsibility, and the Brain with Stephen Morse

MorseA Dialogue on Agency, Responsibility, and the Brain with Stephen Morse

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 12:00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, 3019                       Harvard Law School                                       1585 Massachusetts Avenue                     Cambridge, MA 02138 [Map]

Join guest speaker Professor Stephen J. Morse, JD, PhD, former MacArthur Foundation Law & Neuroscience Project co-Chair and co-Director of the Center for Neuroscience and Society and CLBB Faculty members Judge Nancy A. Gertner and Professor Amanda C. Pustilnik for a conversation about how – or whether – new knowledge about the brain is changing legal concepts of agency and responsibility.

Stephen J. Morse is the Ferdinand Wakeman Hubbell Professor of Law; Professor of Psychology and Law in Psychiatry; and Associate Director, Center for Neuroscience & Society at the University of Pennsylvania. Morse works on problems of individual responsibility and agency. Morse was Co-Director of the MacArthur Foundation Law and Neuroscience Project. Morse is a Diplomate in Forensic Psychology of the American Board of Professional Psychology; a past president of Division 41 of the American Psychological Association; a recipient of the American Academy of Forensic Psychology’s Distinguished Contribution Award; a member of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Mental Health and Law; and a trustee of the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law.

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience.

Tomorrow: 3rd Annual Health Law Year in P/Review

P-Review_2015_poster_with_borderJanuary 30, 2015 7:45 AM – 5:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East AB
1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Please join us for the Third Annual Health Law Year in P/Review symposium, with leading experts discussing major developments during 2014 and what to watch out for in 2015. The discussion at this day long event will cover hot topics in such areas as health insurance, health care systems, public health, innovation, and other issues facing clinicians and patients.

The full agenda with speakers is available on our website.

Attendance is free and open to the public, but space is limited and registration is required. Please register here. Contact petrie-flom@law.harvard.edu with questions.

Tomorrow (1/29): A “Natural” Experiment: Consumer Confusion and Food Claims, a lecture by Efthimios Parasidis

A “Natural” Experiment: Consumer Confusion and Food Claims, a lecture by Efthimios Parasidis

Thursday, January 29, 2015, 12: 00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West B                               Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA [Map]

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Efthimios Parasidis is Associate Professor at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law and holds a joint appointment with the College of Public Health. He is an inaugural member of College of Medicine’s Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities. His scholarship focuses on the regulation of medical products and human subjects research, the interplay between health law and intellectual property, and the application of health information technology to public health policy. He has published in leading law reviews and health policy journals, is co-authoring a casebook, and has a book under contract with Oxford University Press. The Greenwall Foundation awarded Professor Parasidis a Faculty Scholar in Bioethics fellowship for 2014-2017.

The lecture will be followed by an audience question and answer session moderated by Jacob Gersen, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and Director of the Food Law Lab.

Cosponsored by the Food Law Lab and the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic at Harvard Law School.

Next Friday (1/30): Third Annual Health Law Year in P/Review

P-Review_2015_poster_with_borderJanuary 30, 2015 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East AB
1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Please join us for the Third Annual Health Law Year in P/Review symposium, with leading experts discussing major developments during 2014 and what to watch out for in 2015. The discussion at this day long event will cover hot topics in such areas as health insurance, health care systems, public health, innovation, and other issues facing clinicians and patients.

The full agenda with speakers is available on our website.

Attendance is free and open to the public, but space is limited and registration is required. Please register here. Contact petrie-flom@law.harvard.edu with questions.

Upcoming Event (1/29): A “Natural” Experiment: Consumer Confusion and Food Claims, a lecture by Efthimios Parasidis

A “Natural” Experiment: Consumer Confusion and Food Claims, a lecture by Efthimios Parasidis

Thursday, January 29, 2015, 12: 00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West B                               Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA [Map]

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Efthimios Parasidis is Associate Professor at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law and holds a joint appointment with the College of Public Health. He is an inaugural member of College of Medicine’s Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities. His scholarship focuses on the regulation of medical products and human subjects research, the interplay between health law and intellectual property, and the application of health information technology to public health policy. He has published in leading law reviews and health policy journals, is co-authoring a casebook, and has a book under contract with Oxford University Press. The Greenwall Foundation awarded Professor Parasidis a Faculty Scholar in Bioethics fellowship for 2014-2017.

The lecture will be followed by an audience question and answer session moderated by Jacob Gersen, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and Director of the Food Law Lab.

Cosponsored by the Food Law Lab and the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic at Harvard Law School.

Dec 8-10: Seminar Series on Social Medicine in South Africa

By Kelsey Berry

The Harvard School of Public Health Department of Global Health and Population (GHP) is hosting what promises to be a fascinating 2-seminar series on Monday Dec 8 and Wednesday Dec 10 entitled: “A Practice of Social Medicine: South Africa and Beyond.” This event should be of interest to those thinking about models for Universal Health Coverage, community-based approaches to health, history and sociology of medicine and health care delivery, and population-level ethics.

The series will feature Professor Shula Marks, Emeritus Professor, University of London, and Fellow of the British Academy.

A word from the organizers: For just over a decade in the mid-twentieth century, perhaps somewhat surprisingly, South Africa was widely acknowledged as being in the forefront of progressive thought in health care delivery, its distinctive social conditions and developed medical practice making possible an experiment in social medicine with far-reaching implications.  These two lectures trace the story to its South African roots in the 1930s and 1940s, its propagation via the subsequent diaspora of progressive physicians, and its links to kindred developments throughout the world.  Its vision of a community-based, equitable, effective, inclusive, low cost approach to health emphasizing prevention and education may offer a distinctive model for Universal Health Coverage.

*The first lecture South Africa’s Experiment in Social Medicine, 1940-1960: A Model to the World? will be held on Monday December 8th, from 4:30pm to 6:00pm in HSPH Building 1, Room 1208.

*The second lecture Social Medicine in South Africa, 1960s to the Present will be held on Wednesday December 10th, from 4:30pm to 6:00pm in HSPH Building 1, Room 1208

For non-Harvard affiliated attendants, please email mclark@hsph.harvard.edu to arrange for access to the buildings in advance.