Biosecurity in a Globalised World Conference: The Adoption of the Revised International Health Regulations – 10 Years On

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION OPEN

In 2015 it will be 10 years since the adoption of the revised International Health Regulations (IHR). To mark this important anniversary, QUT’s Australian Centre for Health Law Research is pleased to invite you to Biosecurity in a Globalised World: The Adoption of the Revised International Health Regulations – 10 Years On.

The conference will be hosted by the Australian Centre for Health Law Research at Queensland University of Technology’s Gardens Point campus in Brisbane from 27-28 July 2015.

The conference will provide a forum for scholars and policy makers to discuss and present on the progress achieved through the IHR to date, and the important work yet to be done.

The keynote address will be delivered by Professor Lawrence O. Gostin, Founding O’Neill Chair in Global Health Law, Georgetown University, USA.

Themes to be discussed at the conference include:

  • Development of IHR core capacities
  • Regulatory responses
  • Securitisation of infectious disease outbreaks
  • Human rights
  • Papers from all disciplines and areas of expertise are welcome.

For further information please visit http://ihr2015.com/

If you have any questions, or require any assistance, please contact ihr2015@qut.edu.au

2015 Broad Institute Innovation & Intellectual Property Symposium

2015 Broad Institute Innovation & Intellectual Property Symposium

Monday, April 13, 2015 – Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Broad Institute, 415 Main St., Cambridge, MA

This ​symposium ​will ​bring ​together ​Broad ​scientists, ​delegates ​from ​the ​European ​and ​U.S. ​Patent ​Offices, ​and ​global ​business ​and ​legal ​thought ​leaders ​for ​discussion ​and ​information ​exchange ​on ​topics ​related ​to ​innovation ​and ​intellectual ​property ​law ​of ​interest ​to ​the ​Cambridge ​and ​Boston ​scientific, ​business ​and ​legal ​communities. ​

Check out the latest news from the Petrie-Flom Center!

PFC_Banner_DrkBlueCheck out the March 20th edition of the Petrie-Flom Center’s biweekly e-newsletter for the latest on events, affiliate news and scholarship, and job and fellowship opportunities in health law policy and bioethics.

Featured in this edition:

KIngKing v. Burwell and the Future of the Affordable Care Act

April 1, 2015

8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East B
Harvard Law School
1585 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA

A full agenda is available on our website. Register here!

This Term, in King v. Burwell, the Supreme Court will consider whether the Affordable Care Act permits the government to extend tax-credit subsidies to citizens of states that have chosen not to establish their own insurance exchange. If the Court rules that these subsidies are not permitted under the law, the fallout will be extensive and possibly devastating to state insurance markets, and countless local, state, and federal actors will have to decide how to move forward.  This event will bring together scholars and practitioners in the fields of law, public health, and economics to evaluate the oral argument in the case and consider how the Court is likely to rule before exploring the likely impacts of a decision against the government and finally beginning to build groundwork for politically-viable fixes at all levels of public and private involvement.

This event is supported by the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund.

For more on news and events at Petrie-Flom, see the full newsletter.

THIS WEEK (3/18 – 3/20): Families Matter: Ethically, Legally, and Clinically

Families Matter: Ethically, Legally, and Clinically

child_pediatrician_slide_270_200_85_c1March 18 – 20, 2015

Harvard Medical School
Joseph B. Martin Conference Center
77 Avenue Louis Pasteur
Boston, MA 02115

A full agenda is available on our website.

We often talk, in bioethics, about individual autonomy.  Yet our most challenging ethical, legal and clinical controversies in health care often center around family roles and responsibilities: How should we handle parents’ refusals of medically recommended treatment or, conversely, parents’ requests to medicate or surgically alter their children?  What should be known, and by whom, about a child’s genome, especially when genetic information effects other family members?  What weight should be given to family interests in decisions about a child’s health care?  How should we think about 3-parent embryos? Gamete donors? Gestational mothers? What rights and responsibilities should fathers have with regard to decisions about abortion and adoption, for example, as well as health care decisions for their offspring?  Health care decisions might be messier, but maybe they would also be better if we gave more attention to family matters, and how families matter.

This multidisciplinary program has been developed to inform and deliberate with ethicists, health care providers, attorneys and the public about changes in conceptions of the family and medical technologies and practices that challenge moral conventions and contemporary law.  Faculty experts and participants will engage in thoughtful discussion regarding a broad range of ethical and legal issues that arise from new ways of creating and new ways of understanding families and providing health care for expectant parents, growing fetuses, infants, children, adolescents….and their families.

Co-sponsored with the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund.

REGISTER NOW: ReSourcing Big Data – A Symposium and Collaboration Opportunity (3/23)

From Harvard Catalyst:

REGISTER NOW!

March 23: Symposium
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Joseph B. Martin Conference Center
Harvard Medical School

Extant data is an inexhaustible resource that is not yet very well understood and is underutilized. The focus of this symposium is to explore this area from various perspectives – privacy and security, policy, open clinical trial data, systems and disease-oriented synthetic efforts and individually-provided, aggregated crowd-sourced data. The goal is to engage our biomedical and public health research community in a more nuanced appreciation of these and similar issues.

Topics include: data aggregation, access, annotation, refocusing on novel or unanticipated questions, and recombination with diverse demographic/epidemiologic data. Continue reading

TOMORROW (3/11): Identified versus Statistical Lives: An Interdisciplinary Approach Book Launch

Identified_Lives_posterBook Launch: Identified versus Statistical Lives: An Interdisciplinary Approach

March 11, 2015 12:00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, Room 2012 Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Identified versus Statistical Lives: An Interdisciplinary Approach is an edited volume that grew out of the 2012 conference “Identified versus Statistical Lives: Ethics and Public Policy,” cosponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, and the Harvard Global Health Institute. The essays address the identified lives effect, which describes the fact that people demonstrate a stronger inclination to assist persons and groups identified as at high risk of great harm than those who will or already suffer similar harm, but endure unidentified. As a result of this effect, we allocate resources reactively rather than proactively, prioritizing treatment over prevention. Such bias raises practical and ethical questions that extend to almost every aspect of human life and politics.

The book talk and discussion will feature:

  • I. Glenn Cohen, co-editor, Petrie-Flom Faculty Director, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School
  • Norman Daniels, co-editor, Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health, Harvard School of Public Health
  • Nir Eyal, co-editor, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine (Medical Ethics), Harvard Medical School

Co-sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library, with support from the Harvard Global Health Institute.

MONDAY (3/9): Gender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

genderreassignment_slideGender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

Monday, March 9, 2015 12:00 PM

Pound Hall, Room 102, Harvard Law School, 1563 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Trans and intersex individuals face a series of legal, medical, and social challenges. This panel explores these overlapping issues, including: healthcare coverage of treatments such as gender reassignment therapy, the legal recognition of trans identities, intersexuality, and asexuality.  Join us for a wide-ranging panel discussion.

Panelists include:

  • Noa Ben-Asher, Visiting Associate Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
  • Elizabeth F. Emens, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Columbia Law School
  • Gerald L. Neuman, J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law, Harvard Law School
  • Matthew J.B. Lawrence, Academic Fellow, Petrie-Flom Center
  • Moderator: I. Glenn Cohen, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and Lambda at Harvard Law School.

The “Right to Try” – Compassionate Use of Experimental Medicine, 5th Annual Cathy Shine Lecture

SHINE_headerThe “Right to Try” –  Compassionate Use of Experimental Medicine

5th Annual Cathy Shine Lecture

Thursday, March 19, Noon – 1 p.m.
Boston University Medical Campus Instructional Building
Bakst Auditorium
72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA
Free and open to the public
Reception will follow

Is it fair to use social media or personal connections to get experimental drugs? Is it possible to reconcile so-called “right to try” laws—which allow patients access to novel, unapproved treatments—with evidence-based medicine and a drug-approval process charged with ensuring safe and effective medicines? Professor Caplan examines whether the duty to rescue should play a role in regulatory policies, physician advocacy, and corporate behavior in the US. Continue reading

An Opening for Measles: Anti-Vaccination Trend a Growing Concern

An article in the Harvard Gazette about our panel “Measles, Vaccines, and Protecting Public Health,” convened on February 25, 2015:

The numbers paint a telling picture. In the United States of the 1950s there were between 3 million and 4 million annual cases of measles, a highly infectious virus that causes severe flu-like symptoms and a spreading red rash. Roughly 48,000 of those infected each year were hospitalized, and 400 to 500 died.

By 2000, through an effective and widely used vaccine, measles was essentially eliminated in the United States.

But for the last several years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported a significant uptick. Last year, the CDC recorded more than 644 cases from 27 states, the worst since 2000. Only two months into 2015 the United States is facing more than 150 cases reported across the country, many of them tied to a December outbreak at Disneyland in California.

The resurgence involves measles-stricken travelers and American parents who don’t vaccinate their children. […]

Continue reading here.

FREE REGISTRATION! Families Matter: Ethically, Legally, and Clinically

Families Matter: Ethically, Legally, and Clinically

child_pediatrician_slide_270_200_85_c1March 18 – 20, 2015

Harvard Medical School
Joseph B. Martin Conference Center
77 Avenue Louis Pasteur
Boston, MA 02115

A full agenda is available on our website.

We often talk, in bioethics, about individual autonomy.  Yet our most challenging ethical, legal and clinical controversies in health care often center around family roles and responsibilities: How should we handle parents’ refusals of medically recommended treatment or, conversely, parents’ requests to medicate or surgically alter their children?  What should be known, and by whom, about a child’s genome, especially when genetic information effects other family members?  What weight should be given to family interests in decisions about a child’s health care?  How should we think about 3-parent embryos? Gamete donors? Gestational mothers? What rights and responsibilities should fathers have with regard to decisions about abortion and adoption, for example, as well as health care decisions for their offspring?  Health care decisions might be messier, but maybe they would also be better if we gave more attention to family matters, and how families matter.

This multidisciplinary program has been developed to inform and deliberate with ethicists, health care providers, attorneys and the public about changes in conceptions of the family and medical technologies and practices that challenge moral conventions and contemporary law.  Faculty experts and participants will engage in thoughtful discussion regarding a broad range of ethical and legal issues that arise from new ways of creating and new ways of understanding families and providing health care for expectant parents, growing fetuses, infants, children, adolescents….and their families.

Co-sponsored with the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund.

BOOK LAUNCH (3/11): Identified versus Statistical Lives: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Book Launch: Identified versus Statistical Lives: An Interdisciplinary Approach

March 11, 2015 12:00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, Room 2012 Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Identified versus Statistical Lives: An Interdisciplinary Approach is an edited volume that grew out of the 2012 conference “Identified versus Statistical Lives: Ethics and Public Policy,” cosponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, and the Harvard Global Health Institute. The essays address the identified lives effect, which describes the fact that people demonstrate a stronger inclination to assist persons and groups identified as at high risk of great harm than those who will or already suffer similar harm, but endure unidentified. As a result of this effect, we allocate resources reactively rather than proactively, prioritizing treatment over prevention. Such bias raises practical and ethical questions that extend to almost every aspect of human life and politics.

The book talk and discussion will feature:

  • I. Glenn Cohen, co-editor, Petrie-Flom Faculty Director, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School
  • Norman Daniels, co-editor, Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health, Harvard School of Public Health
  • Nir Eyal, co-editor, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine (Medical Ethics), Harvard Medical School

Co-sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library, with support from the Harvard Global Health Institute.

NEW DATE (3/9): Gender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

genderreassignment_slideGender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

Monday, March 9, 2015 12:00 PM

Pound Hall, Room 102, Harvard Law School, 1563 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Trans and intersex individuals face a series of legal, medical, and social challenges. This panel explores these overlapping issues, including: healthcare coverage of treatments such as gender reassignment therapy, the legal recognition of trans identities, intersexuality, and asexuality.  Join us for a wide-ranging panel discussion.

Panelists include:

  • Noa Ben-Asher, Visiting Associate Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
  • Elizabeth F. Emens, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Columbia Law School
  • Gerald L. Neuman, J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law, Harvard Law School
  • Matthew J.B. Lawrence, Academic Fellow, Petrie-Flom Center
  • Moderator: I. Glenn Cohen, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and Lambda at Harvard Law School.

TOMORROW: Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics

Cohen_Medical_Tourism_slidePatients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics
I. Glenn Cohen and Dr. Robert Klitzman

Tuesday, February 24, 5:30 – 7:00 PM ET

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

Merrill House 170 East 64th Street, New York, NY 10065-7478

Live Video Stream HERE

 

Medical tourism is a growing, multi-billion dollar industry involving millions of patients who travel abroad each year to get health care.

Some seek services like hip replacements and travel to avoid queues, save money, or because their insurer has given them an incentive to do so. Others seek to circumvent prohibitions on accessing services at home and go abroad to receive abortions, assisted suicide, commercial surrogacy, or experimental stem cell treatments.

How safe are these procedures? How do you ensure that you will be protected if anything should happen?

I. Glenn Cohen is professor of law at Harvard Law School and director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics. He is the author of Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics.

Dr. Robert Klitzman will lead the conversation. He is a professor of psychiatry in the College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Joseph Mailman School of Public Health and the director of the Masters of Bioethics Program at Columbia University.

This event is part of Carnegie Council’s Global Health Series.

Check out the latest news from the Petrie-Flom Center!

PFC_Banner_DrkBlueCheck out the February 20th edition of the Petrie-Flom Center’s biweekly e-newsletter for the latest on events, affiliate news and scholarship, and job and fellowship opportunities in health law policy and bioethics.

Featured in this edition:

child_pediatrician_slide_270_200_85_c1FREE REGISTRATION!
Families Matter: Ethically, Legally, and Clinically

March 18 – 20, 2015
Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA

We often talk, in bioethics, about individual autonomy.  Yet our most challenging ethical, legal and clinical controversies in health care often center around family roles and responsibilities: How should we handle parents’ refusals of medically recommended treatment or, conversely, parents’ requests to medicate or surgically alter their children?  What should be known, and by whom, about a child’s genome, especially when genetic information effects other family members?  What weight should be given to family interests in decisions about a child’s health care?  How should we think about 3-parent embryos? Gamete donors? Gestational mothers? What rights and responsibilities should fathers have with regard to decisions about abortion and adoption, for example, as well as health care decisions for their offspring?  Health care decisions might be messier, but maybe they would also be better if we gave more attention to family matters, and how families matter. Continue reading

AGENDA NOW AVAILABLE! 2015 Annual Conference: Law, Religion, and Health in America

2015 Annual Conference – Law, Religion, and Health in America

stethoscope_bible_slideMay 8 – 9, 2015

Milstein East BC
Harvard Law School
1585 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138 [Map]

Religion and medicine have historically gone hand in hand, but increasingly have come into conflict in the U.S. as health care has become both more secular and more heavily regulated.  Law has a dual role here, simultaneously generating conflict between religion and health care, for example through new coverage mandates or legally permissible medical interventions that violate religious norms, while also acting as a tool for religious accommodation and protection of conscience.

This conference, and anticipated edited volume, will aim to: (1) identify the various ways in which law intersects with religion and health care in the United States; (2) understand the role of law in creating or mediating conflict between religion and health care; and (3) explore potential legal solutions to allow religion and health care to simultaneously flourish in a culturally diverse nation.

Special sessions include:

  • Thursday, May 7, pre-conference session on the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision
  • Friday, May 8, Keynote: Douglas Laycock, University of Virginia School of Law – Religious Liberty, Health Care, and the Culture Wars
  • Saturday, May 9, Plenary Session: Adèle Keim, The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, and Gregory Lipper, Americans United for Separation of Church and State – The Contraceptives Coverage Mandate Litigation

 A full agenda is now available on our website

The conference is free and open to the public, but space is limited and registration is required. REGISTER ONLINE.

Pre-conference session co-sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center and the Ambassador John L. Loeb Initiative on Religious Freedom and Its Implications at the Harvard Kennedy School Center for American Political Studies.

The full conference is supported by the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund.

EVENT NEXT WEEK (2/25): Measles, Vaccines, and Protecting Public Health

15.02.25, measles posterMeasles, Vaccines, and Protecting Public Health

Wednesday, February 25, 2015, 4:00 PM 

Wasserstein Hall, Room 1010 Harvard Law School 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

The recent measles outbreak centered around Disneyland in California has reignited the contentious debate over childhood vaccination in the United States. Join us for a discussion of the ethical, legal, and public health issues surrounding vaccines, including mandates, exemptions, parental rights, and the role of misinformation in modern medicine.

Panelists:

  • George Annas, Boston University School of Public Health, School of Medicine, and School of Law
  • Nir Eyal, Harvard Medical School
  • Dyann Wirth, Harvard School of Public Health
  • Moderator: Ahmed Ragab, Harvard Divinity School

This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Tomorrow (2/12): A Dialogue on Agency, Responsibility, and the Brain with Stephen Morse

MorseA Dialogue on Agency, Responsibility, and the Brain with Stephen Morse

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 12:00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, 3019                       Harvard Law School                                       1585 Massachusetts Avenue                     Cambridge, MA 02138 [Map]

Join guest speaker Professor Stephen J. Morse, JD, PhD, former MacArthur Foundation Law & Neuroscience Project co-Chair and co-Director of the Center for Neuroscience and Society and CLBB Faculty members Judge Nancy A. Gertner and Professor Amanda C. Pustilnik for a conversation about how – or whether – new knowledge about the brain is changing legal concepts of agency and responsibility.

Stephen J. Morse is the Ferdinand Wakeman Hubbell Professor of Law; Professor of Psychology and Law in Psychiatry; and Associate Director, Center for Neuroscience & Society at the University of Pennsylvania. Morse works on problems of individual responsibility and agency. Morse was Co-Director of the MacArthur Foundation Law and Neuroscience Project. Morse is a Diplomate in Forensic Psychology of the American Board of Professional Psychology; a past president of Division 41 of the American Psychological Association; a recipient of the American Academy of Forensic Psychology’s Distinguished Contribution Award; a member of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Mental Health and Law; and a trustee of the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law.

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience.

CANCELED: Gender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues – TO BE RESCHEDULED

Update: Monday, February 9, 2015, 8:15pm: Due to severe winter weather Harvard Law School is closed on Tuesday, February 10. This event is canceled, but will be rescheduled for a later date. Check back here or sign up for our newsletter for updates!

genderreassignment_slideGender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

Trans and intersex individuals face a series of legal, medical, and social challenges. This panel explores these overlapping issues, including: healthcare coverage of treatments such as gender reassignment therapy, the legal recognition of trans identities, intersexuality, and asexuality.  Join us for a wide-ranging panel discussion.

Panelists include:

  • Noa Ben-Asher, Visiting Associate Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
  • Elizabeth F. Emens, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Columbia Law School
  • Gerald L. Neuman, J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law, Harvard Law School
  • Matthew J.B. Lawrence, Academic Fellow, Petrie-Flom Center
  • Moderator: I. Glenn Cohen, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and Lambda at Harvard Law School.

Tomorrow (2/5): A Right to Health? A Lecture by John Tasioulas

tasioulasA Right to Health? A lecture by John Tasioulas

Thursday, February 5, 2015 12:00 PM    

Wasserstein Hall, Room 3019
Harvard Law School
1589 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA

There have been recent calls to establish a framework convention on health grounded in the human right to health. But is there really a human right to health? If there is, what does it entitle us to, and how do we decide? This lecture by John Tasioulas will offer new answers to these questions, and will further argue that global health policy has to be responsive to all human rights, not just the right to health, and that we must address more than human rights in order to create effective global health policy.  Response by I. Glenn Cohen.

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School.

NEXT WEEK: 2/10, Gender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

genderreassignment_slideGender (Re)assignment: Legal, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues

Tuesday, February 10, 2015 12:00 PM

Pound Hall, Room 102, Harvard Law School, 1563 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Trans and intersex individuals face a series of legal, medical, and social challenges. This panel explores these overlapping issues, including: healthcare coverage of treatments such as gender reassignment therapy, the legal recognition of trans identities, intersexuality, and asexuality.  Join us for a wide-ranging panel discussion.

Panelists include:

  • Noa Ben-Asher, Visiting Associate Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
  • Elizabeth F. Emens, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Columbia Law School
  • Gerald L. Neuman, J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law, Harvard Law School
  • Matthew J.B. Lawrence, Academic Fellow, Petrie-Flom Center
  • Moderator: I. Glenn Cohen, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and Lambda at Harvard Law School.