Posts Tagged ‘Arthur Kohn’

Recommendations from Conference Board Task Force on Corporate/Investor Engagement

Posted by Charles Nathan, RLM Finsbury, and Arthur H. Kohn, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, on Wednesday March 19, 2014 at 9:37 am
  • Print
  • email
  • Twitter
Editor’s Note: Charles Nathan is partner and head of the Corporate Governance Practice at RLM Finsbury. Arthur H. Kohn is a partner at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP. This post relates to a report from The Conference Board Task Force on Corporate/Investor Engagement, one of three related publications released by The Conference Board Governance Center as a result of its year-long multifaceted study of corporate/investor engagement.

The 2008 financial crisis and the slow recovery that has followed has brought further evidence tending to support the view that the structure of our corporate sector needs adjustment, and that its faults affect the competitiveness of our economy. The crisis has resulted, as would be expected, in a raft of new rules and regulations, which as usual have been implemented before there emerged any consensus about the nature of the problems. There has also been a vigorous competition of ideas over causes and remedies.

…continue reading: Recommendations from Conference Board Task Force on Corporate/Investor Engagement

Nasdaq Proposes Tweaks to Compensation Committee Independence Requirements

Editor’s Note: Arthur H. Kohn is a partner at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP. This post is based on a Cleary Gottlieb memorandum by Michael Albano, Mary Alcock, and Jonathan Reinstein.

On November 26, 2013, the Nasdaq Stock Market filed a proposal to amend its listing rules implementing Rule 10C-1 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, governing the independence of compensation committee members. [1] Currently, Nasdaq Listing Rule 5605(d)(2)(A) and IM-5605-6 employ a bright line test for independence that prohibits compensation committee members from accepting directly or indirectly any consulting, advisory or other compensatory fees from the company or any subsidiary. The requirement is subject to exceptions for fees received for serving on the board of directors (or any of its committees) or fixed amounts of compensation under a retirement plan for prior service with the company provided that such compensation is not contingent on continued service.

…continue reading: Nasdaq Proposes Tweaks to Compensation Committee Independence Requirements

The Separation of Ownership from Ownership

Editor’s Note: Matteo Tonello is managing director of corporate leadership at The Conference Board. This post relates to an issue of The Conference Board’s Director Notes series authored by Arthur H. Kohn and Julie L. Yip-Williams; the complete publication, including footnotes, is available here.

The increase in institutional ownership of corporate stock has led to questions about the role of financial intermediaries in the corporate governance process. This post focuses on the issues associated with the so-called “separation of ownership from ownership,” arising from the growth of three types of institutional investors, pensions, mutual funds, and hedge funds.

To a great extent, individuals no longer buy and hold shares directly in a corporation. Instead, they invest, or become invested, in any variety of institutions, and those institutions, whether directly or through the services of one or more investment advisers, then invest in the shares of America’s corporations. This lengthening of the investment chain, or “intermediation” between individual investor and the corporation, translates into additional agency costs for the individual investor and the system, as control over investment decisions becomes increasingly distanced from those who bear the economic benefits and risks of owners as principals. The rapid growth in intermediated investments has led to concerns about the consequences of intermediation and the role of institutional investors and other financial intermediaries in the corporate governance process. These concerns are particularly relevant against a background of increasing demands for shareholder engagement and involvement in the governance of America’s corporations.

…continue reading: The Separation of Ownership from Ownership

Selected Issues for Boards of Directors in 2013

Posted by Victor I. Lewkow, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, on Monday January 28, 2013 at 9:29 am
  • Print
  • email
  • Twitter
Editor’s Note: Victor Lewkow is a partner at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP. This post is based on a Cleary Gottlieb memorandum by Mr. Lewkow, Alan Beller, Mitchell Lowenthal, Janet Fisher, Arthur Kohn, David Leinwand, and Ethan Klingsberg.

In the years since the financial reporting scandals and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and in particular following the financial crisis and the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010, boards of directors have faced greater burdens and more intense scrutiny of their activities and performance. One manifestation of this has been pressure to change the role of directors from one of partnership with and oversight of management to one of an almost quasi-governmental watchdog directly responsible for monitoring management’s performance, including its compliance with increasingly complex and burdensome regulation. In addition, activist investors continue to publicly push some boards to pursue strategies focused on short-term returns, even in instances where those strategies are inconsistent with the directors’ preferred, sustainable long-term strategies for the corporation.

In recent years, we have advised that directors regularly work with their advisors to monitor and adapt to the continually changing landscape. Among other things, we have suggested more frequent, well-structured engagement with shareholders, a focus on the ability to communicate the corporation’s and board’s policies in a way that is understandable and convincing to the corporation’s constituencies, and that directors prepare to respond to increasing external pressures in a manner that both thoughtfully takes those pressures into account and fully reflects the director’s carefully considered view of the long-term interests of the corporation.

In addition to these general points, we also have seen developing during 2012 a series of additional specific issues, discussed below, on which we believe boards of directors and corporations should focus in 2013.

…continue reading: Selected Issues for Boards of Directors in 2013

New Personal Use of Corporate Aircraft Tax Rules

Posted by Arthur H. Kohn, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, on Saturday September 8, 2012 at 8:37 am
  • Print
  • email
  • Twitter
Editor’s Note: Arthur Kohn is a partner at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP. This post is based on a Cleary Gottlieb memorandum by Mr. Kohn, Sheldon Alster, Mary Alcock, Jeffrey Penn, Caroline Hayday and Corey Goodman.

On August 1, 2012, the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) published final regulations concerning the tax deductibility of corporate expenses associated with the personal use by employees of corporate aircraft. [1] As noted below, these rules may have implications for those involved with public-company executive compensation disclosure, as well as of course for tax practitioners who must apply the rules to prepare federal income tax returns. [2] Generally, the principal takeaways are as follows:

…continue reading: New Personal Use of Corporate Aircraft Tax Rules

Delaware Case Raises Question About Structuring Director Compensation

Posted by Arthur H. Kohn, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, on Thursday August 30, 2012 at 9:14 am
  • Print
  • email
  • Twitter
Editor’s Note: Arthur H. Kohn is a partner at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP. This post is based on a Cleary Gottlieb memorandum by Mr. Kohn, Janet Fisher and Samuel Bryant. This post is part of the Delaware law series, which is cosponsored by the Forum and Corporation Service Company; links to other posts in the series are available here.

A recent opinion of the Delaware Chancery Court, Seinfeld v. Slager, [1] addresses the legal standard applicable to directors’ decisions about their own pay under Delaware law, an important topic as to which there is little prior law. In an opinion by Vice Chancellor Glasscock, the Court held that a derivative claim alleging that directors breached their fiduciary duties by granting themselves excessive compensation survived a motion to dismiss. [2] In so concluding, the Court also found that the directors’ action did not have the protection of the business judgment rule and was instead subject to “entire fairness” review.

The Court’s decision to require “entire fairness” review means that the claim of excessive compensation could proceed to a full evidentiary trial on the merits. Under Delaware law, a court will not second-guess business judgments of directors if the directors acted in good faith, exercised due care and were not conflicted in the matter. When the business judgment rule does not apply, the judgments may be subject to heightened scrutiny under the entire fairness standard. To meet this standard, the directors must demonstrate that both the process undertaken by directors and the amount of their compensation are fair to the company.

…continue reading: Delaware Case Raises Question About Structuring Director Compensation

Implications of the AIG Bonus Imbroglio

Posted by Arthur H. Kohn, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, on Saturday April 18, 2009 at 10:43 am
  • Print
  • email
  • Twitter
Editor’s Note: This post is based on a client memorandum by A. Richard Susko, Arthur H. Kohn and Mary E. Alcock of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

Great outrage and indignation have been expressed, from multiple perspectives, in connection with AIG’s retention bonuses and the Congressional response thereto. Now that most of the public, albeit probably not the actual participants, seem to be past the initial burst of emotion, we believe that it is well worth noting that all employers, whether or not they are recipients of Government funds, should pay close attention to the several recently proposed (and competing) bills in Congress spawned by the episode.

These bills show that the politics of populist furor over executive compensation can easily pave the way for hasty and thoughtless regulation, which would (if enacted as written) be counterproductive to the US financial system and economic recovery. The bills also foreshadow possible future and potentially broad legislation that may eventually have negative effects for many companies beyond the financial industry.

Political focus on, and accompanying rhetoric regarding, perceived excesses in executive compensation have been building in intensity for some time. The current legislative impulses, however, raise systemic risks that pose a far greater danger than the issues sought to be addressed by them. In our recent memorandum, entitled “Implications of the AIG Bonus Imbroglio,” we discuss particularly troublesome aspect of the four recently proposed bills, including the lack of an exception for existing binding compensation contracts. The memorandum also outlines possibly unintended and negative consequences to employers, employees and the public alike of the bills and briefly summarizes relevant provisions of each of the bills.

Whatever the immediate prospects for passage may be, we believe that it is important for employers and employees generally to be aware of the substance of the recent proposals even if they are not the targets at the moment.

The memorandum is available here.

 
  •  » A "Web Winner" by The Philadelphia Inquirer
  •  » A "Top Blog" by LexisNexis
  •  » A "10 out of 10" by the American Association of Law Librarians Blog
  •  » A source for "insight into the latest developments" by Directorship Magazine