Posts Tagged ‘Brian Broughman’

Carrots & Sticks: How VCs Induce Entrepreneurial Teams to Sell Startups

Posted by Jesse Fried, Harvard Law School, on Wednesday February 27, 2013 at 9:23 am
  • Print
  • email
  • Twitter
Editor’s Note: Jesse Fried is a Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and Brian Broughman is an Associate Professor of Law at the Maurer School of Law at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Venture capitalists (VCs) play a significant role in the financing of high-risk, technology-based business ventures. VC exits usually take one of three forms: an initial public offering (IPO) of a portfolio company’s shares, followed by the sale of the VC’s shares into the public market; a “trade sale” of the company to another firm; or dissolution and liquidation of the company.

Of these three types of exits, IPOs have received the most scrutiny. This attention is not surprising. IPO exits tend to involve the largest and most visible VC-backed firms. And, perhaps just as importantly, the IPO process triggers public-disclosure requirements under the securities laws, making data on IPO exits easily accessible to researchers.

But trade sales are actually much more common than IPOs and, in aggregate, are more financially important to VCs. Unlike IPOs, however, trade sales do not trigger the intense public-disclosure requirements of the securities laws; they take place in the shadows. Thus, although trade sales play a critical role in the venture capital cycle, relatively little is known about them.

In our paper, Carrots & Sticks: How VCs Induce Entrepreneurial Teams to Sell Startups recently made public on SSRN, Brian Broughman and I seek to shine more light on intra-firm dynamics around trade sales. In particular, we investigate how VCs induce the “entrepreneurial team” – the founder, other executives, and common shareholders – to go along with a trade sale that they might have an incentive to resist.

…continue reading: Carrots & Sticks: How VCs Induce Entrepreneurial Teams to Sell Startups

Do VCs Use Inside Rounds to Dilute Founders?

Posted by R. Christopher Small, Co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Friday July 8, 2011 at 9:22 am
  • Print
  • email
  • Twitter
Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Brian Broughman of the Maurer School of Law at Indiana University, Bloomington, and Jesse Fried, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.

In our paper, Do VCs Use Inside Rounds to Dilute Founders? Some Evidence from Silicon Valley, recently made publicly available on SSRN, Brian Broughman and I examine the role of inside financing rounds in VC-backed firms.

VCs typically invest through several rounds of financing. Each round is separately negotiated and priced. A subsequent (“follow-on”) round of financing could be provided by either (a) the firm’s existing VC investors exclusively (an inside round) or (b) a group led by a VC fund that did not invest in the startup’s earlier rounds (an outside round). Historically, most follow-on financings were structured as outside rounds, in part to mitigate conflict between the entrepreneur and existing VCs over the value of the firm. In recent years, however, more than half of follow-on rounds have been structured as inside rounds.

…continue reading: Do VCs Use Inside Rounds to Dilute Founders?

 
  •  » A "Web Winner" by The Philadelphia Inquirer
  •  » A "Top Blog" by LexisNexis
  •  » A "10 out of 10" by the American Association of Law Librarians Blog
  •  » A source for "insight into the latest developments" by Directorship Magazine