Posts Tagged ‘Controlling shareholders’

Delaware Decision Reinforces Need for Proper Procedure in Squeeze-Out Merger

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Thursday March 20, 2014 at 9:04 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from David N. Shine, partner and co-head of the Mergers and Acquisitions Practice at Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP, and is based on a Fried Frank publication.

The private equity firm that was the controlling stockholder of Orchard Enterprises effected a squeeze-out merger of the minority public stockholders. Two years later, a Delaware appraisal proceeding determined that Orchard’s shares at the time of the merger were worth more than twice as much as was paid in the merger. Public shareholders then brought suit, claiming that the directors who had approved the merger and the controlling stockholder had breached their fiduciary duties and should be held liable for damages. The Orchard decision [1] issued by the Delaware Chancery Court this past Friday adjudicates the parties’ respective motions for summary judgment before trial.

…continue reading: Delaware Decision Reinforces Need for Proper Procedure in Squeeze-Out Merger

Delaware Court Endorses Business Judgment Review in Controlling Stockholder Mergers

Editor’s Note: Theodore N. Mirvis and Paul Rowe are partners in the Litigation Department at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz. This post is based on a Wachtell Lipton memorandum by Mr. Mirvis, Mr. Rowe, Igor Kirman, and William Savitt. This post is part of the Delaware law series, which is cosponsored by the Forum and Corporation Service Company; links to other posts in the series are available here.

The Delaware Supreme Court today affirmed that a going-private transaction may be reviewed under the deferential business judgment rule when it is conditioned on the approval of both a well-functioning special committee and a majority of the minority stockholders. Kahn v. M&F Worldwide Corp., No. 334, 2013 (Del. Mar. 14, 2014).

As described in our previous memo, the case arose out of a stockholder challenge to a merger in which MacAndrews & Forbes acquired the 57% of M&F Worldwide it did not already own. Then-Chancellor Strine granted summary judgment in favor of the defendants, finding that the record established the transaction was approved by both an independent special committee that functioned effectively and had the power to say no and the fully-informed vote of a majority of the unaffiliated stockholders, thus entitling them to business judgment review.

…continue reading: Delaware Court Endorses Business Judgment Review in Controlling Stockholder Mergers

Creeping Takeovers and Fiduciary Duties—A Recap

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Friday November 8, 2013 at 9:03 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Spencer D. Klein, partner in the Corporate Department and co-chair of the global Mergers & Acquisitions Group at Morrison & Foerster LLP, and is based on a Morrison & Foerster publication. This post is part of the Delaware law series, which is cosponsored by the Forum and Corporation Service Company; links to other posts in the series are available here.

In In re Sirius XM Shareholder Litigation, [1] Delaware Chancellor Strine dismissed a complaint that the Sirius board had breached its fiduciary duties by adhering to the provisions of an investment agreement with Liberty Media that precluded the Sirius board from blocking Liberty Media’s acquisition of majority control of Sirius through open-market purchases made by Liberty Media following a three-year standstill period. By holding the complaint to be time-barred under the equitable doctrine of laches the Delaware court did not address the merits of whether the Sirius board breached its fiduciary duties. However, In re Sirius still offers the opportunity to recap the guidance on “creeping takeovers” that can be derived from existing Delaware case law:

…continue reading: Creeping Takeovers and Fiduciary Duties—A Recap

Director Independence: Interplay Between Delaware Law and Exchange Rules

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Monday October 7, 2013 at 9:17 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Jay P. Lefkowitz, senior litigation partner and member of the Global Management Executive Committee at Kirkland & Ellis LLP, and is based on a Kirkland publication by Mr. Lefkowitz, Andrew B. Clubok, Yosef J. Riemer, and Matthew Solum. This post is part of the Delaware law series, which is cosponsored by the Forum and Corporation Service Company; links to other posts in the series are available here.

The MFW decision that was issued earlier this year by the Chancellor of the Delaware Chancery Court has been the subject of much discussion with respect to transactions involving controlling shareholders. [1] But the decision also addressed another important topic: the interplay between the exchange rules and Delaware law with respect to director independence. MFW seemed to align the Delaware law test for director independence with the specific, detailed independence requirements in the exchange rules, but Delaware decisions since MFW continue to reflect highly fact-intensive inquiries that look beyond the bright-line exchange rules. Accordingly, it is important to consider both the exchange rules and the latest guidance from Delaware courts when assessing director independence.

…continue reading: Director Independence: Interplay Between Delaware Law and Exchange Rules

New York Court Upholds Kenneth Cole Going Private Transaction

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Thursday September 19, 2013 at 9:11 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Tariq Mundiya, partner in the litigation department of Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP, and is based on a Willkie client memorandum by Mr. Mundiya and Sameer Advani.

On September 3, 2013, a New York trial court dismissed a stockholder challenge to a going private transaction in which Kenneth Cole, who held approximately 47% of the Company’s outstanding common stock and controlled 90% of the voting power of Kenneth Cole Productions Inc. (“KCP”), purchased the remaining 53% of the common stock of KCP that he did not already own. Willkie Farr & Gallagher represented Mr. Cole in the underlying going private transaction and the class action litigation that ensued.

The Facts

On February 24, 2012, KCP announced that Mr. Cole had proposed a transaction to take KCP private and to pay the public stockholders $15.00 per share, which reflected a 17% premium to KCP’s unaffected share price. KCP’s board created a special committee of four independent directors to negotiate with Mr. Cole, who conditioned his bid on the approval of the special committee and the affirmative vote of a majority of the minority stockholders. Mr. Cole made it publicly clear that he would not entertain any offers to sell his shares in a third party transaction and was only interested in buying shares from the minority stockholders. After several months of negotiations, Mr. Cole agreed to pay $15.25 per share. 99.8% of KCP’s shares unaffiliated with Mr. Cole that voted ultimately voted in favor of the transaction.

…continue reading: New York Court Upholds Kenneth Cole Going Private Transaction

The Effect of Delaware Doctrine on Freezeout Structure and Outcomes

Editor’s Note: Guhan Subramanian is the Joseph Flom Professor of Law and Business at the Harvard Law School. The following post is based on a paper co-authored by Professor Subramanian and Fernan Restrepo of Stanford Law School. This post is part of the Delaware law series, which is cosponsored by the Forum and Corporation Service Company; links to other posts in the series are available here.

Historically, buyouts by controlling shareholders (also known as “going-private transactions,” “squeeze-outs,” and hereinafter “freezeouts”) were subject to different standards of judicial scrutiny under Delaware corporate law based on the transactional form used by the controlling shareholder to execute the deal. In a line of cases dating back at least to the Delaware Supreme Court’s 1994 decision in Kahn v. Lynch Communications, a freezeout executed as a statutory merger was subject to stringent “entire fairness” review, due to the self-dealing nature of the transaction. In contrast, in a line of cases beginning with the Delaware Chancery Court’s 2001 opinion in In re Siliconix Inc. Shareholder Litigation, a freezeout executed as a tender offer was subject to deferential business judgment review.

Subramanian (2007) presents evidence that, after Siliconix, minority shareholders received less in tender offer freezeouts than in merger freezeouts. Restrepo (2013) finds that these differences in outcomes occurred only after Siliconix, and that the incidence of tender offer freezeouts increased after this opinion, also supporting the idea that controlling shareholders took advantage of the opportunity provided by Siliconix. Subramanian (2005) describes why these differences in outcomes for minority shareholders create a social welfare loss and not just a one-time wealth transfer from minority shareholders to the controlling shareholder.

…continue reading: The Effect of Delaware Doctrine on Freezeout Structure and Outcomes

The Sensitivity of Corporate Cash Holdings to Corporate Governance

Posted by Katherine Schipper, Duke University, on Wednesday November 28, 2012 at 9:10 am
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Editor’s Note: Katherine Schipper is a Professor of Accounting at Duke University.

In the paper, The Sensitivity of Corporate Cash Holdings to Corporate Governance, forthcoming in the Review of Financial Studies, my co-authors (Qi Chen, Xiao Chen, Yongxin Xu, and Jian Xue) and I analyze the change in cash holdings of a large sample of Chinese-listed firms associated with the split share structure reform that required nontradable shares held by controlling shareholders to be converted to tradable shares, subject to shareholder approval and adequate compensation to tradable shareholders. The reform removed a substantial market friction and gave controlling shareholders a clear incentive to care about share prices, because they could benefit from share value increases by selling some of their shares for cash.

We predict and find that this governance improvement led to reduced cash holdings of affected firms, and that the effect is more pronounced for private firms than for state-owned enterprises (SOEs), for firms with more agency conflicts, and for firms for which financial constraints are most binding. We interpret these results as consistent with both a direct free cash flow channel and an indirect financial constraint channel. These results are robust to several alternative specifications that address concerns about endogeneity and concomitant effects. They provide strong evidence that governance arrangements affect firms’ cash holdings and cash management behaviors. To the extent that cash management is a key operational decision that affects firm value, our findings suggest an important mechanism for corporate governance to affect firm value.

…continue reading: The Sensitivity of Corporate Cash Holdings to Corporate Governance

Ownership Dynamics with Large Shareholders

Posted by R. Christopher Small, Co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Wednesday February 22, 2012 at 10:41 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Marcelo Donelli and Borja Larrain, both of the Universidad Catolica de Chile, and Francisco Urzua of the Department of Finance at Tilburg University.

In our paper Ownership Dynamics with Large Shareholders: an Empirical Analysis, forthcoming in the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, we study ownership dynamics in a country where controlling shareholders are prevalent. We find that ownership structures are very persistent and that pyramidal structures are associated with less dispersion than other control structures. We also find that dilution is preceded by higher returns and predicts low returns in the future, which is a typical feature of market timing.

It is an established fact that ownership is typically dispersed in the US and the UK, but concentrated in the rest of the world. Yet, why is it that markets do not converge to the dispersed ownership paradigm of the US/UK? Why is it that approximately 20% of firms in the US and UK are tightly controlled, whereas 70% of firms in Continental Europe are tightly controlled? What prevents controlling shareholders from diluting their stakes in the firms they control? We aim to provide an answer to these questions by examining Chilean firms’ ownership dynamics in a 20 year period (1990-2009). We benefit from Chile’s unique features, such as improvements in the protection to minority shareholders, economy’s steep growth (per capita GDP more than doubled in PPP terms), markets’ booms and busts, and excellent data sources. Despite these unique features, what we learn sheds light on ownership dynamics in a number of different markets, as Chile is similar to other developed and emerging economies in terms of financial development, the overall level of ownership concentration, and protection to minority shareholders.

…continue reading: Ownership Dynamics with Large Shareholders

French Thin Cap Reform

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Sunday January 22, 2012 at 10:17 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Jeffrey M. Trinklein, partner and member of the International Tax Practice Group at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, and is based on a Gibson Dunn alert by Jérôme Delaurière.

According to a reform applicable as of January 1, 2012, the right to deduct interest due with respect to the purchase of shares in French target companies will be denied, unless the French acquiring company demonstrates — by any means — that (i) the decisions relating to such shares and (ii) the control over the target companies are effectively made by it or by a related party established in France.

For the purpose of this reform, a related party can be a controlling company or an entity controlled by or under common control with the acquiring company.

This new rule targets the purchase of shareholdings that are eligible for the French long-term participation exemption regime, i.e. mainly shares that represent at least 5% of the financial and voting rights of companies (other than certain real estate property companies).

…continue reading: French Thin Cap Reform

FTSE Announces Change to Minimum Free Float Requirements

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Thursday January 19, 2012 at 10:06 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Glen M. Scarcliffe, partner at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, and is based on a Cleary Gottlieb Alert Memorandum.

On December 14, 2011, the FTSE Group published the results of its market consultation on the minimum free float [1] requirements for inclusion of premium London-listed companies [2] in the FTSE UK Index Series – one of the most recognized indices in the world, which includes the FTSE 100 Index. The key outcome of the consultation is that, as of January 1, 2012, the minimum free float required for UK-incorporated companies will increase from 15% to 25%, with grandfathering of existing FTSE companies until January 1, 2014.

I. Current Free Float Requirements

Under the FTSE Ground Rules, companies that wish to be included in the FTSE UK Index Series must maintain a minimum free float:

  • of at least 50%, if not incorporated in the UK; or
  • of at least 15% (or 5% where the relevant company’s market capitalization exceeds US $5 billion), if incorporated in the UK.

…continue reading: FTSE Announces Change to Minimum Free Float Requirements

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