Posts Tagged ‘Martin Gruenberg’

FDIC’s Progress on Wall Street Reform

Posted by Martin J. Gruenberg, Chairman, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, on Monday February 25, 2013 at 9:25 am
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Editor’s Note: Martin J. Gruenberg is chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. This post is based on Chairman Gruenberg’s testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, available here.

The economic dislocations experienced in recent years, which far exceeded any since the 1930s, were the direct result of the financial crisis of 2007-08. The reforms enacted by Congress in the Dodd-Frank Act were aimed at addressing the causes of the crisis. The reforms included changes to the FDIC’s deposit insurance program, a series of measures to curb excessive risk-taking at large, complex banks and non-bank financial companies and a mechanism for orderly resolution of large, nonbank financial companies.

The regulatory changes mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act require careful implementation to ensure they address the risks posed by the largest, most complex institutions while being sensitive to the impact on community banks that did not contribute significantly to the crisis. As implementation moves forward, the FDIC has been engaged as well in an extensive effort to better understand the forces driving long-term change among U.S. community banks and to solicit input from community bankers on these trends and on the regulatory process.

My testimony will address the impact of the Dodd-Frank Act on the restoration of the Deposit Insurance Fund (DIF), our efforts to carry out the requirement of the Act to develop the ability to resolve large, systemic financial institutions, and our progress on some of the key rulemakings. In addition, I will briefly discuss the results of our recent community banking initiative.

…continue reading: FDIC’s Progress on Wall Street Reform

Enhancing Bank Supervision and Reducing Systemic Risk

Posted by Martin J. Gruenberg, Chairman, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, on Thursday June 21, 2012 at 9:35 am
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Editor’s Note: Martin Gruenberg is acting chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. This post is based on Chairman Gruenberg’s testimony before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, available here.

Implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act: Measures to Address Systemic Risk

The economic dislocations we have experienced in recent years, which have far exceeded those associated with any recession since the 1930s, were the direct result of the financial crisis of 2007-08. The reforms enacted under the Dodd-Frank Act were aimed at addressing the root causes of the crisis. Foremost among these reforms were measures to curb excessive risk-taking at large, complex banks and non-bank financial companies, where the crisis began. Title I of the Dodd-Frank Act includes new provisions that enhance prudential supervision and capital requirements for systemically-important financial institutions (SIFIs), while Title II authorizes a new orderly liquidation authority that significantly enhances the ability to resolve a failed SIFI without contributing to additional financial market distress.

SIFI Resolution Authorities

The most important new FDIC authorities under the Dodd-Frank Act are those that provide for enhanced resolution planning and, if needed, the orderly resolution of SIFIs. Prior to the recent crisis, the FDIC’s receivership authorities were limited to federally insured banks and thrift institutions. There was no authority to place the holding company or affiliates of an insured institution or any other non-bank financial company into an FDIC receivership to avoid systemic consequences. The lack of this authority severely constrained the ability of the government to resolve a SIFI and contributed to the excessive risk taking that led to the crisis.

…continue reading: Enhancing Bank Supervision and Reducing Systemic Risk

FDIC’s Orderly Liquidation Authority

Posted by Martin J. Gruenberg, Chairman, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, on Saturday June 9, 2012 at 7:53 am
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Editor’s Note: Martin Gruenberg is acting chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. This post is based on Chairman Gruenberg’s remarks at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago Bank Structure Conference, available here.

I would like to take the opportunity to discuss one of those challenging issues – the orderly resolution of systemically important financial institutions ( SIFIs). The Dodd-Frank Act provided important new authorities to the FDIC to resolve SIFIs. Prior to the recent crisis, the FDIC’s receivership authorities were limited to federally insured banks and thrift institutions. There was no authority to place the holding company or affiliates of an insured institution or any other non-bank financial company into an FDIC receivership to avoid systemic consequences. The lack of this authority severely constrained the ability of the government to resolve a SIFI.

This authority has now been provided to the FDIC under the Dodd-Frank Act. The question is whether the FDIC can develop the operational capability to utilize this authority effectively and a credible strategy under which an orderly resolution of a SIFI can be carried out without putting the financial system itself at risk. These key challenges have been the focus of the FDIC’s efforts since the enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act in July 2010. I would like to focus my comments today on the progress we have made in meeting these important challenges.

…continue reading: FDIC’s Orderly Liquidation Authority

Implementing the Volcker Rule

Posted by Martin J. Gruenberg, Chairman, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, on Saturday February 4, 2012 at 10:59 am
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Editor’s Note: Martin Gruenberg is Acting Chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. This post is based on Chairman Gruenberg’s testimony before the House of Representatives Committee on Financial Services, available here.

Last November, the FDIC, jointly with the Federal Reserve Board of Governors (FRB), the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR) requesting public comment on a proposed regulation implementing the Volcker Rule requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act. On December 23, the four agencies extended the comment period for an additional 30 days until February 13, 2012. The comment period was extended as part of a coordinated interagency effort to allow interested persons more time to analyze the issues and prepare their comments, and to facilitate coordination of the rulemaking among the responsible agencies. In addition, on January 11, 2012, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) approved the issuance of its NPR to implement the Volcker Rule, with a substantially identical proposed rule text as the interagency NPR. We look forward to receiving comments on the NPR.

In recognition of the potential impacts that may arise from the proposed rule and its implementation, the Agencies have requested comments on whether the rule represents a balanced and effective approach in implementing the Volcker Rule or whether alternative approaches exist that would provide greater benefits or implement the statutory requirements with fewer costs. The FDIC is committed to developing a final rule that meets the objectives of the statute while preserving the ability of banking entities to perform important underwriting and market-making functions, including the ability to effectively carry out these functions in less-liquid markets.

…continue reading: Implementing the Volcker Rule

Present and Future Challenges for the Banking Industry and the FDIC

Posted by Martin J. Gruenberg, Chairman, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, on Sunday October 9, 2011 at 8:45 am
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Editor’s Note: Martin Gruenberg is Acting Chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. This post is based on Chairman Gruenberg’s remarks to the American Banker Regulatory Symposium, available here.

Condition of the Banking Industry

The FDIC and the banking industry are only now emerging from the most severe financial crisis since the 1930s. The latest data, released by the FDIC in its Quarterly Banking Profile last month, indicate that banks have continued to make gradual but steady progress in recovering from the financial market turmoil and severe recession that unfolded from 2007 through 2009.

The economic recovery, now entering its third year, has been marked by continued distress in real estate markets and a slow, painful process of balance-sheet repair by households, financial institutions, small businesses, and, now, governments at all levels. The result has not only been sub-par growth compared with previous recoveries, but also a persistent uncertainty about the future prospects for the economy, for jobs, and for the banking industry.

All of these trends are, of course, of concern to policymakers and to the public. The FDIC remains alert to these challenges going forward.

…continue reading: Present and Future Challenges for the Banking Industry and the FDIC

 
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