Posts Tagged ‘Ole-Kristian Hope’

Blockholder Heterogeneity and Financial Reporting Quality

Posted by R. Christopher Small, Co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Thursday October 10, 2013 at 9:35 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Yiwei Dou of the Department of Accounting, Taxation & Business Law at New York University; Ole-Kristian Hope, Professor of Accounting at the University of Toronto; Wayne Thomas, Professor of Accounting at the University of Oklahoma; and Youli Zou of the Accounting Area at the University of Toronto.

An issue of considerable interest to accounting researchers is the association between shareholders and firms’ financial reporting quality (FRQ). In our paper, Blockholder Heterogeneity and Financial Reporting Quality, which was recently made publicly available on SSRN, we examine a specific type of shareholder, blockholders, because (1) they offer a sample of shareholders that are expected to have a significant impact on firms’ financial reporting decisions and (2) we are able to track individual blockholders and their association with FRQ. As discussed in more detail below, these two sample design features allow us to provide a test of the extent to which (large) shareholders influence FRQ. Blockholders also provide an interesting and economically important sample because of their large presence in U.S. capital markets in recent years.

…continue reading: Blockholder Heterogeneity and Financial Reporting Quality

Tax Avoidance and Geographic Earnings Disclosure

Posted by R. Christopher Small, Co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Tuesday August 6, 2013 at 8:47 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Ole-Kristian Hope, Professor of Accounting at the University of Toronto; Mark (Shuai) Ma of the Department of Accounting at the University of Oklahoma; and Wayne Thomas, Professor of Accounting at the University of Oklahoma.

Multinational firms can avoid taxes through structured transactions among different jurisdictions (e.g., Rego 2003), such as reallocating taxable income from high-tax jurisdictions to low-tax ones (Collins et al. 1998). This type of income shifting significantly reduces tax revenues of governments in high-tax jurisdictions and potentially hinders domestic economic growth and other social benefits (e.g., GAO 2008; U.S. Senate 2006). Policy makers around the world, including the United States, European Union, and Canada, have either enacted or are considering regulations related to multinational firms’ cross-jurisdictional income shifting and tax avoidance behavior. However, relatively little is known about multinational corporate tax avoidance behavior (Hanlon and Heitzman 2010), though such knowledge provides a basis for making and enforcing related rules. Further, the relation between firms’ tax avoidance and financial disclosures is not well established. In our paper, Tax Avoidance and Geographic Earnings Disclosure, forthcoming in the Journal of Accounting and Economics, we investigate how geographic earnings disclosure in firms’ financial reports relates to multinational firms’ tax avoidance behavior.

…continue reading: Tax Avoidance and Geographic Earnings Disclosure

Financial Reporting Quality of U.S. Private and Public Firms

Posted by R. Christopher Small, Co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Monday April 29, 2013 at 9:25 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Ole-Kristian Hope, Professor of Accounting at the University of Toronto; Wayne Thomas, Professor of Accounting at the University of Oklahoma; and Dushyantkumar Vyas of the Department of Accounting at the University of Minnesota.

In our paper, Financial Reporting Quality of U.S. Private and Public Firms, forthcoming in The Accounting Review, we use a new database that contains accounting data for a large sample of U.S. private firms and provide an investigation of financial reporting quality (FRQ) of U.S. private versus public firms. Private firms are an important source of economic growth in the United States and elsewhere. In the aggregate, non-listed firms have about four times more employees, three times higher revenues, and twice the amount of assets than do listed firms (Berzins, Bøhren, and Rydland 2008). In 2008, Forbes reported that the 441 largest private companies in the United States accounted for $1.8 trillion in revenues and employed 6.2 million people. Despite their obvious importance to the U.S. economy, there is limited research on private firms in general, and almost no prior research related to the financial reporting quality (FRQ) of such firms.

…continue reading: Financial Reporting Quality of U.S. Private and Public Firms

The Effect of Disclosure on the Pay-Performance Relation

Posted by R. Christopher Small, Co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Friday January 18, 2013 at 8:59 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Gus DeFranco and Ole-Kristian Hope, both of the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, and Stephannie Larocque of the Department of Accounting at the Mendoza College of Business, University of Notre Dame.

An important task for boards is to oversee executive compensation. The effectiveness of boards in carrying out this monitoring responsibility, however, is widely debated. In the paper, The Effect of Disclosure on the Pay-Performance Relation, forthcoming in the Journal of Accounting and Public Policy, we argue that disclosure improves board effectiveness. First and as a general point, disclosure can improve transparency, which facilitates the monitoring of management and hence causes managers to act more in the interests of shareholders. Such monitoring is potentially valuable since managers will not always act in the best interest of shareholders.

…continue reading: The Effect of Disclosure on the Pay-Performance Relation

 
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