Posts Tagged ‘Regulation Fair Disclosure’

SEC Settles Regulation FD Case Against Former Vice President

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Sunday September 29, 2013 at 9:16 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from John H. Sturc, partner and co-chair of the Securities Enforcement Practice Group at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, and is based on a Gibson Dunn alert.

On September 6, 2013, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) announced that it had brought—and settled—a cease-and-desist case under Regulation Fair Disclosure (Reg. FD), which requires that public companies broadly disclose material nonpublic information to the public that their covered officers and employees intentionally or inadvertently disclose to market professionals and stockholders. The SEC charged Lawrence D. Polizzotto, a former Vice President of Investor Relations at First Solar, Inc., with selectively disclosing that the company was unlikely to receive financing under a conditional loan from the Department of Energy. Mr. Polizzotto agreed to pay a $50,000 fine to settle the charges, although he did not admit or deny the findings.

According to the SEC order, [1] Mr. Polizzotto attended a September 13, 2011 investor conference with the company’s then-CEO, who “publicly expressed confidence” that First Solar would receive three loan guarantees of $4.5 billion from the Department of Energy. Several executives, including Mr. Polizzotto, learned a couple of days later that First Solar would not get at least one of the loan guarantees. The company began discussing how and when to publicly disclose this information. However, before the company issued a public announcement, a number of analysts and stockholders began contacting the company after the House Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a letter to the Department of Energy inquiring about its loan guarantee program and the status of the guarantees that had not yet closed, including all three of First Solar’s conditional guarantees. Even though the company had not yet issued its public announcement, Mr. Polizzotto and his subordinate had phone conversations with more than 30 analysts and investors. They used talking points on the calls that “effectively signaled” First Solar would not receive one of the loan guarantees. The SEC charged that these calls violated Reg. FD, which requires simultaneous public disclosure of material nonpublic information that is intentionally disclosed by covered corporate officers and company spokespersons to market professionals and stockholders. [2] In addition to the $50,000 penalty from the settlement of these charges, Mr. Polizzotto agreed to cease and desist from violating Reg. FD and Section 13(a) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934.

…continue reading: SEC Settles Regulation FD Case Against Former Vice President

How to Use Social Media for Regulation FD Compliance

Posted by Richard J. Sandler, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Tuesday April 16, 2013 at 9:44 am
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Editor’s Note: Richard J. Sandler is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and co-head of the firm’s global corporate governance group. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum.

Regulation FD, adopted by the SEC in 2000, prohibits “selective disclosure” by requiring public companies to disclose material information through broadly accessible channels. Thirteen years ago, this meant EDGAR filings, press releases and quarterly earnings calls.

The SEC recently issued a report of investigation under Section 21(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 regarding its inquiry into a post by Netflix’s CEO on his personal Facebook page. In the report, the SEC affirmed that a company may use social media to communicate with investors without violating Regulation FD – as long as the company had adequately informed the market that material information would be disclosed in this manner. The report states that whether a company’s social media disclosure satisfies Regulation FD will depend upon the principles outlined in the SEC’s 2008 guidance, Commission Guidance on the Use of Company Web Sites, while recapping that guidance in a way that should make these principles more workable for companies that want to use websites, social media and other evolving communication methods to disclose important information to the market.

…continue reading: How to Use Social Media for Regulation FD Compliance

The Board, Social Media and Regulation FD

Posted by David A. Katz, Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, on Thursday March 28, 2013 at 5:06 pm
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Editor’s Note: David A. Katz is a partner at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz specializing in the areas of mergers and acquisitions and complex securities transactions. This post is based on an article by Mr. Katz and Laura A. McIntosh that first appeared in the New York Law Journal; the full article, including footnotes, is available here.

The widespread use of social media in today’s global marketplace presents opportunities and challenges for all financial market participants, including boards of directors, investors and regulators. While social media outlets provide unprecedented pathways for companies to engage actively with investors, both large and small, as well as with reporters, analysts, customers, suppliers and other members of the corporate community, there are regulatory restrictions that public companies need to heed. Releasing information via Twitter, Facebook, and similar channels must be done with caution to avoid violating Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Regulation FD as it currently stands. Moreover, companies are vulnerable to negative publicity that can be quickly and widely disseminated over social media networks, even if they are not active participants in such channels.

As public companies increasingly use and rely upon the new avenues of communication provided by social media, it is correspondingly important for directors to be aware of the manner and extent of their companies’ use of social media and have a basic understanding of the risks and benefits of corporate participation. At the same time, it may be incumbent upon the SEC to revisit Regulation FD. The immediacy and availability of communications made through social media suit the purpose of Regulation FD far better than anything available at the time of its passage in 2000; by failing to update Regulation FD, the SEC may find that the rule is impeding rather than furthering its stated goals. Fundamentally, the interests of all market participants are aligned when it comes to encouraging companies to use social media consistently, effectively, and legally, as enhanced transparency and increased engagement generally benefit the market as a whole.

…continue reading: The Board, Social Media and Regulation FD

Regulation FD in the Age of Facebook and Twitter

Posted by Joseph Grundfest, Stanford Law School, on Thursday February 28, 2013 at 9:36 am
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Editor’s Note: Joseph A. Grundfest is the W. A. Franke Professor of Law and Business at Stanford University Law School.

The Staff of the Securities and Exchange Commission has announced its intention to recommend to the Commission that enforcement proceedings alleging a violation of Regulation FD be instituted against Netflix, Inc. and its CEO, Reed Hastings, because of a posting on Mr. Hastings’ personal Facebook page. Mr. Hastings’ webpage had more than 200,000 followers, including reporters who covered the posting in the traditional press. The posting was also the subject of a tweet by TechCrunch, which has approximately 2.5 million followers on Twitter.

This article, Regulation FD in the Age of Facebook and Twitter: Should the SEC Sue Netflix?, is in the form of an amicus Wells Submission suggesting that the Commission would, for nine distinct reasons, be prudent not to initiate an action on the facts of the Netflix posting. In particular, the public record suggests that the posting did not contain material information, was not a selective disclosure, and because of its spread through social media constituted a “broad non-exclusionary distribution” that did not violate Regulation FD. A prosecution would also diverge dramatically from all prior Regulation FD enforcement proceedings, and would violate the Commission’s prior representations not to “second guess” good faith efforts to comply with Regulation FD. In addition, the posting is not inconsistent with the Commission’s 2008 Guidance on the Use of Company Webpages — guidance that is seriously outdated because of the emergence of social media.

…continue reading: Regulation FD in the Age of Facebook and Twitter

Applying Securities Laws to Social Media Communications

Posted by Holly Gregory, Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP, on Saturday January 5, 2013 at 9:28 am
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Editor’s Note: Holly J. Gregory is a corporate partner specializing in corporate governance at Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP. This post is based on a Weil alert by Christopher Garcia and Melanie Conroy; the full document, including footnotes, is available here.

This month marked an important milestone in the development of securities law at its newest frontier: social media. For the first time, the Enforcement Division of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) issued a Wells Notice based on a social media communication. This Wells Notice, which notified Netflix, Inc. and its CEO of the Enforcement Division’s intent to recommend an enforcement case to the Commission, demonstrates the potential for liability arising from disclosures by corporate officers through social media. Although the SEC itself uses social media to disclose important information, the agency has yet to offer formal guidance concerning the use of social media to communicate with the investing public. For this reason, the outcome of the SEC’s investigation into Netflix and its CEO’s social media usage will prove instructive to issuers, directors, corporate officers, investors, and members of the securities and white collar bars.

…continue reading: Applying Securities Laws to Social Media Communications

The Directors’ Duty to Inform

Posted by John Wilcox, Sodali, on Thursday March 31, 2011 at 9:06 am
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Editor’s Note: John Wilcox is Chairman of Sodali, a director of ShareOwners.org, and former Head of Corporate Governance at TIAA-CREF. The article discussed below is available here.

Comply-and-Explain: Should Directors Have a Duty to Inform?, published recently in Duke Law School’s Journal of Law and Contemporary Problems, argues that the directors of publicly held companies in the United States should be subject to a new state law duty requiring them to explain to shareholders how the board is exercising business judgment and acting in the best interests of the corporation.

The duty is derived from: (1) the Model Business Corporation Act (MBCA) Section 8.30 that requires directors to act in the best interest of the corporation and to share information material to the exercise of the board’s decision-making or oversight functions; (2) Section 3.C.4 of the American Bar Association’s Corporate Director’s Guidebook, that sets forth a director’s “duty of disclosure”; and (3) the Department of Labor ERISA requirements governing the fiduciary duties of institutional investors and their exercise of proxy votes. The duty to inform also builds on concepts from the UK’s principles-based, comply-or-explain governance system that gives directors wide discretion to customize governance policies provided that they explain how their decisions are intended to achieve business goals and serve the best interests of the company and its shareholders.

…continue reading: The Directors’ Duty to Inform

The Fifth Analyst Call: Investors Seek Greater Communication with Directors

Posted by Scott Hirst, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Sunday March 20, 2011 at 10:19 am
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Editor’s Note: The following posts comes to us from Deborah Gilshan, Corporate Governance Counsel at Railpen Investments, and Elizabeth McGeveran, Senior Vice President at F&C Asset Management. A statement with further information is available here.

A group of major and influential global institutional investors from North America, Europe and Australia , led by the UK’s Railpen Investments and F&C Asset Management, are seeking to build open and constructive dialogue with US boards of directors through a concrete, easy-to-implement solution – an idea we are calling a “Fifth Analyst Call.”

In a nutshell, companies would host an open call for their investors prior to the annual meeting – a fifth call added onto the calendar of quarterly analyst calls, with the focus on corporate governance. Prior to the annual meeting, investors consider important details related to the issuer, including whether or not to endorse a company’s compensation plan and the actions of the directors during the year. For their part, issuers produce a detailed proxy statement which represents the considered decisions of officers and directors. This is the natural time for a substantive, practical discussion about corporate governance issues, including compensation. The proxy statement offers a perfect opening for dialogue between shareholders and independent directors such as the lead director.

…continue reading: The Fifth Analyst Call: Investors Seek Greater Communication with Directors

Investor Communication and “Fifth Analyst Call”

Posted by David A. Katz, Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, on Tuesday February 15, 2011 at 9:13 am
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Editor’s Note: David A. Katz is a partner at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz specializing in the areas of mergers and acquisitions and complex securities transactions. This post is based on an article by Mr. Katz and Laura A. McIntosh that first appeared in the New York Law Journal.

As the 2011 proxy season approaches, companies are focused on drafting their proxy statements and preparing for their annual meetings. With mandatory nonbinding say-on-pay votes on the ballot and continued focus by corporate governance activists on executive compensation, communication issues with investors, especially large stockholders, are taking on increased importance.

Recently, a group of institutional investors representing approximately $2.2 trillion in assets under management, led by Walden Asset Management, has asked that some companies host an annual conference call specifically for institutional investors to focus on corporate governance discussions in the proxy statement. [1] The call would be held after the publication of the company’s proxy statement and prior to the company’s annual meeting of stockholders. Each company that is approached by this group must consider this request in the context of its own situation; however, we offer some thoughts below on why companies may wish to resist this proposed new obligation. As a practical matter, such a conference call would be unlikely to provide investors with any useful information beyond the disclosures in the proxy statement; as a legal matter, any material, non-public information disclosed by the company must be provided to all stockholders, rather than to a select group of institutional investors.

…continue reading: Investor Communication and “Fifth Analyst Call”

The Perils of Implied Messages for Reg FD

Posted by Annette L. Nazareth, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Tuesday October 26, 2010 at 9:15 am
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Editor’s Note: Annette Nazareth is a partner in the Financial Institutions Group at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum by Michael Kaplan, William M. Kelly, Linda Chatman Thomsen and Janice Brunner.

The SEC recently announced settled Reg FD charges against Office Depot and its CEO and former CFO related to “signals” that Office Depot made in one-on-one conversations with analysts implying that it would not meet future earnings expectations. The Office Depot settlement, which is the SEC’s third Reg FD action in a little over a year after an approximately four-year hiatus, is distinctive because the challenged statements appear to have been crafted—unsuccessfully, as it turned out—to walk the FD compliance line by avoiding express references to changes in the company’s business.

…continue reading: The Perils of Implied Messages for Reg FD

SEC Amendment Governing Rating Agency Disclosure Will Have Little Impact

Posted by Andrew J. Nussbaum, Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, on Sunday October 24, 2010 at 9:11 am
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Editor’s Note: Andrew J. Nussbaum is a member of the Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Corporate Department. This post is based on a Wachtell Lipton firm memorandum by Mr. Nussbaum, Eric S. Robinson, and David A. Katz.

Late last month the SEC issued a final rule amending Regulation FD to eliminate the exemption for disclosures made to credit rating agencies. (Exchange Act Release No. 63003) The amendment, which becomes effective upon publication in the Federal Register, was specifically required by the Dodd-Frank Act. We do not view this as a material development as some have suggested.

Companies routinely disclose material, nonpublic information to credit rating agencies for the purpose of developing a credit rating, including in advance of merger announcements or in connection with significant changes in capital structures. While some commentators have suggested the amendment will require issuers to make public disclosures of material nonpublic information that they disclose to credit rating agencies, the effect of the amendment is less than it seems. The public disclosure requirements triggered by Regulation FD are limited to disclosures by the issuer, or persons acting on its behalf, to certain enumerated persons, generally securities market professionals, investment advisers and holders of the company’s securities under circumstances where it is reasonably foreseeable that the person will purchase or sell the issuer’s securities on the basis of the information. In 2006, the Investment Advisers Act was amended to exclude from the definition of investment adviser any nationally recognized statistical rating organization unless it engages in issuing recommendations as to purchasing, selling or holding securities or in managing assets (including securities) on behalf of others.

…continue reading: SEC Amendment Governing Rating Agency Disclosure Will Have Little Impact

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