Posts Tagged ‘Reporting regulation’

Dodd-Frank Rules Impact End-Users of Foreign Exchange Derivatives

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Thursday April 3, 2014 at 9:13 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Michael Occhiolini, partner focusing on corporate finance, corporate law and governance, and derivatives at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, and is based on a WSGR Alert memorandum. The complete publication, including annexes, is available here.

This post is a summary of certain recent developments under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank) that impact corporate end-users of over-the-counter foreign exchange (FX) derivative transactions and should be read in conjunction with the four prior WSGR Alerts on Dodd-Frank FX issues from October 2011, September 2012, February 2013, and July 2013.

Title VII of Dodd-Frank amended the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA) and other federal securities laws to provide a comprehensive new regulatory framework for the treatment of over-the-counter derivatives, which are generally defined as “swaps” under Section 1a(47) of the CEA. Among other things, Dodd-Frank provides for:

…continue reading: Dodd-Frank Rules Impact End-Users of Foreign Exchange Derivatives

Activist Abuses Require SEC Action on Section 13(d) Reporting

Editor’s Note: Theodore N. Mirvis is a partner in the Litigation Department at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz. The following post is based on a Wachtell Lipton memorandum by Mr. Mirvis, Andrew R. Brownstein, Adam O. Emmerich, David A. Katz, and David C. Karp. Work from the Program on Corporate Governance about about Section 13(d) and blockholder disclosure includes The Law and Economics of Blockholder Disclosure by Lucian Bebchuk and Robert J. Jackson, Jr., discussed on the forum here.

Three years ago we petitioned the SEC to modernize the beneficial ownership reporting rules under Section 13(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (see our rulemaking petition, our memos of March 7, 2011, April 15, 2011, March 3, 2008 and our article in the Harvard Business Law Review). Since we filed our petition, activist hedge funds have grown more brazen in exploiting the existing reporting rules to the disadvantage of ordinary investors.

…continue reading: Activist Abuses Require SEC Action on Section 13(d) Reporting

District Court Dismisses Claim that Potential Litigation Disclosure Was Required

Posted by Kobi Kastiel, Co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Tuesday November 19, 2013 at 9:20 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Eric M. Roth, partner in the litigation department at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, and is based on a Wachtell Lipton memorandum by Mr. Roth.

A recent decision of the Southern District of New York is noteworthy in its rejection of the plaintiffs’ argument that disclosure of a threatened suit in which the potential loss could have reached $10 billion was required under either the federal securities laws or Accounting Standards Codification 450. See In re Bank of America AIG Disclosure Sec. Litig., C.A. No. 11 Civ. 6678 (JGK) (S.D.N.Y. Nov. 1, 2013).

In January 2011, BofA and AIG entered into an agreement to toll the statute of limitations on fraud and securities claims arising out of BofA’s sale of mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) to AIG. In February 2011, AIG provided BofA with a detailed analysis of its potential claims in which it claimed to have lost more than $10 billion. Later that month, BofA’s annual report disclosed that it faced “substantial potential legal liability” relating to sales of MBS, which “could have a material adverse effect on [its] cash flow, financial condition, and results of operations,” but cautioned that BofA “could not estimate a range of loss for all matters in which losses were probable or reasonably possible.” BofA did not disclose the tolling agreement with AIG or the magnitude of its potential exposure to AIG. On August 8, 2011, AIG had filed a complaint against BofA seeking damages of at least $10 billion. BofA’s stock price dropped 20% in a single day.

…continue reading: District Court Dismisses Claim that Potential Litigation Disclosure Was Required

SEC Adopts Changes to Broker-Dealer Rules

Editor’s Note: Russell D. Sacks is a partner in the Financial Institutions Advisory & Financial Regulatory Group at Shearman & Sterling LLP. The following post is based on a Shearman & Sterling publication by Mr. Sacks, Sylvia Favretto, Charles S. Gittleman, and David L. Portilla. The complete publication, including footnotes and appendices, is available here.

The US Securities and Exchange Commission recently adopted important changes to the financial responsibility rules for securities broker-dealers, including changes to the regulatory capital and regulatory reporting rules. The new rules include important regulatory capital changes in relation to acting as agent in securities lending, assumption of broker-dealer expenses, and important new recordkeeping and reporting rules relating to compliance with risk mitigation and financial responsibility.

Introduction

Summary of the Rule Changes

On July 30, 2013, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) adopted changes to its financial responsibility rules for securities broker-dealers, and, in particular, adopted important changes to Rule 15c3-1, the “net capital rule.” [1] The net capital rule is the principal SEC rule governing regulatory capital requirements for securities broker-dealers in the United States.

…continue reading: SEC Adopts Changes to Broker-Dealer Rules

CFTC Adopts Final Rule Amendments for CPOs and CTAs

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Saturday August 31, 2013 at 9:03 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Sullivan & Cromwell LLP, and is based on a publication by Donald R. Crawshaw, David J. Gilberg, Frederick Wertheim, and Saul P. Sarrett.

On August 13, 2013, the CFTC adopted final rule amendments to accept compliance with the disclosure, reporting and recordkeeping regime administered by the SEC as substituted compliance for substantially all of part 4 of the CFTC’s regulations that are applicable to CPOs of funds registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940. [1] The adopting release broadens the approach set forth in the harmonization proposals issued by the CFTC in February 2012 [2] and provides, among other things, that if the CPO of registered funds satisfies all applicable SEC rules for such funds as well as certain other conditions, it will be deemed in compliance with the CFTC’s rules regarding:

  • delivery of disclosure documents to each prospective participant in any pool that a CPO operates (Section 4.21); [3]
  • distribution of account statements to each participant in any pool that a CPO operates (Sections 4.22(a) and (b));
  • provision of information that must appear in a CPO’s disclosure documents (Section 4.24), including performance disclosures (Section 4.25); and
  • the use, amendment and filing of disclosure documents (Section 4.26).

Additionally, the CFTC’s final rule amendments modify certain CFTC disclosure and reporting requirements that are applicable to all CPOs and CTAs:

…continue reading: CFTC Adopts Final Rule Amendments for CPOs and CTAs

FINRA Proposes to Disseminate Transaction Reports in Corporate Debt Securities

Editor’s Note: Russell D. Sacks is a partner in the Financial Institutions Advisory & Financial Regulatory Group at Shearman & Sterling LLP. The following post is based on a Shearman & Sterling publication by Mr. Sacks, Charles S. Gittleman, David L. Portilla, and Leo Wong.

FINRA has proposed a trade-reporting rule change that would result in the public dissemination of secondary market transactions in corporate debt securities sold under Securities Act Rule 144A. If adopted, this change could affect secondary market transactions in a number of assets classes, including high-yield debt securities.

Introduction

On July 8, 2013, the US Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”) submitted an amendment to its Rule 6750 to the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). If adopted, the amendment would allow FINRA to disseminate information on transactions effected pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933 (“Rule 144A”) through the Trade Reporting and Compliance Engine (“TRACE”), the principal trade-reporting system for fixed-income securities. The proposed amendment would allow FINRA to disseminate information regarding secondary transactions effected pursuant to Rule 144A. It would not require the reporting of primary transactions.

…continue reading: FINRA Proposes to Disseminate Transaction Reports in Corporate Debt Securities

Investor Organizations Oppose Tightening of Canadian Disclosure Regime

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Saturday August 3, 2013 at 8:52 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Alex Moore, partner at Davies, Ward, Phillips & Vineberg LLP, and discusses an MFA and AIMA joint comment letter submitted with the Canadian Securities Administrators. The comment letter is available here.

The Managed Funds Association (“MFA”) and the Alternative Investment Management Association (“AIMA”) and have jointly submitted a comment letter with the Canadian Securities Administrators with respect to proposed changes to Canada’s block shareholder reporting regimes known in Canada as the Early Warning Reporting (“EWR”) system and the Alternative Monthly Reporting (“AMR”) system. The EWR and AMR systems are the Canadian equivalents to Schedule 13(d) and 13(g) disclosure in the United States.

The comment letter provides an extensive discussion of the importance of shareholder engagement and activist investing and the consequential benefits from such activity that accrue to all shareholders, as well as to target companies and the economy more generally. The letter submits that the CSA’s proposed tightening of Canada’s block shareholder reporting rules will stifle shareholder engagement and democracy and insulate incumbent managers from owners. The full text of the MFA and AIMA comment letter is available here: http://www.osc.gov.on.ca/documents/en/Securities-Category6-Comments/com_20130712_62-104_kaswellsj.pdf.

The changes to the EWR and AMRS regimes proposed by the CSA include:

…continue reading: Investor Organizations Oppose Tightening of Canadian Disclosure Regime

Strengthening Oversight of Broker-Dealers to Prevent Another Madoff

Posted by Luis A. Aguilar, Commissioner, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, on Thursday August 1, 2013 at 9:23 am
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Editor’s Note: Luis A. Aguilar is a Commissioner at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. This post is based on Commissioner Aguilar’s statement regarding the SEC’s final rule concerning broker-dealer custody practices; the full text, including footnotes, is available here. The views expressed in the post are those of Commissioner Aguilar and do not necessarily reflect those of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the other Commissioners, or the Staff.

The facts surrounding Bernie Madoff’s unprecedented fraud are well-known. Through a Ponzi scheme, he stole untold billions over decades. What is not as well-appreciated is that during the vast majority of this time, he operated solely as a registered broker-dealer. This led to the inevitable conclusion that the regulatory framework for broker-dealer custody required urgent strengthening.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“Commission” or “SEC”) has finally adopted amendments to strengthen the framework governing broker-dealer custody practices to prevent another Madoff. The adoption of these amendments comes more than four and a half years after Madoff’s scheme came to light in December, 2008, and more than two years after they were proposed. As a Commissioner, I have often been asked about steps the Commission has taken to prevent another Madoff, and it has concerned me that these issues have not been addressed.

…continue reading: Strengthening Oversight of Broker-Dealers to Prevent Another Madoff

Reporting, Accounting, and Auditing in Financial Markets

Posted by Elisse Walter, Commissioner, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, on Thursday June 20, 2013 at 9:14 am
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Editor’s Note: Elisse B. Walter is a Commissioner at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and was the Chairman of the SEC from December 2012 to April 2013. This post is based on Commissioner Walter’s recent remarks at the SEC and Financial Reporting Institute Conference, available here. The views expressed in this post are those of Commissioner Walter and do not necessarily reflect those of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the other Commissioners, or the Staff.

You may not hear this too often from people outside your profession, but I have always had a passion for accounting and auditing. I think this has its roots in the time I spent with my father, who was a CPA and the CFO of a publicly-held company; he helped me begin to understand just how important accounting is to business and the financial system. Of course, in my more than two decades with the SEC, which included close to a decade in the Division of Corporation Finance, I have developed a deeper and more complete understanding of the critical role accounting and auditing professionals play in our capital markets.

And today, I am pleased to see that we are working to adapt and expand that role to serve investors and other stakeholders even more effectively in the years ahead, by addressing critical issues at a moment of great change and important progress in the worlds of finance and accounting.

…continue reading: Reporting, Accounting, and Auditing in Financial Markets

Section 13(r) Disclosure Guidance for Public Companies

Posted by Brian Breheny, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP, on Thursday February 21, 2013 at 9:10 am
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Editor’s Note: Brian V. Breheny is a partner at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP. This post is based on an Eight Law Firm Consensus Report by Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP; Hogan Lovells US LLP; Latham & Watkins LLP; Mayer Brown LLP; Morrison & Foerster LLP; O’Melveny & Myers LLP; Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP; and Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP.

Starting in February 2013, the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act (the “Threat Reduction Act”) will impose new reporting requirements on U.S. domestic and foreign companies that are required to file reports with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). In particular, Section 219 of the Threat Reduction Act added new Section 13(r) to the Exchange Act. Under Section 13(r), Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Annual Reports on Form 20-F and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q filed pursuant to Exchange Act Section 13(a) must include disclosure of contracts, transactions and “dealings” with Iranian and other entities. Section 13(r) is effective beginning with reports with a due date after February 6, 2013.

The Staff of the Division of Corporation Finance of the SEC (the “SEC Staff”) has provided helpful guidance on implementation of these new requirements in Exchange Act Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Questions 147.01-147.07 (available at http://www.sec.gov/divisions/corpfin/guidance/exchangeactsections-interps.htm). However, many questions remain, and the following questions and answers represent the consensus views of the undersigned law firms.

None of the firms subscribing to this report intends thereby to give legal advice to any person. The undersigned firms recommend that counsel be consulted with respect to matters addressed in this report. The answers below may need to be modified based upon unique facts and circumstances.

…continue reading: Section 13(r) Disclosure Guidance for Public Companies

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