Posts Tagged ‘Richard Sandler’

Governance Practices for IPO Companies: A Davis Polk Survey

Posted by Richard J. Sandler, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Monday February 3, 2014 at 9:10 am
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Editor’s Note: Richard J. Sandler is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and co-head of the firm’s global corporate governance group. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum.

Amid the recent uptick in U.S. IPO transactions to levels not seen since the heady days of 1999 and 2000, Davis Polk’s pipeline of deals remains robust, leading us to believe that strength in the U.S. IPO market will continue in the near future. With ongoing pressure on companies that are past the IPO stage to update or modify their corporate governance practices to align with the views of some shareholders and proxy advisory groups, we thought this would be a good time to review corporate governance practices of newly public companies to see if they have also shifted in recent years. Our survey is an update of our October 2011 survey and focuses on corporate governance at the time of the IPO for the 100 largest U.S. IPOs from September 2011 through October 2013. Results are presented separately for controlled companies and non-controlled companies in recognition of their different governance profiles.

…continue reading: Governance Practices for IPO Companies: A Davis Polk Survey

Exclusive Forum Provisions: Is Now the Time to Act?

Posted by Richard J. Sandler, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Thursday November 7, 2013 at 9:09 am
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Editor’s Note: Richard J. Sandler is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and co-head of the firm’s global corporate governance group. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum by Mr. Sandler, Arthur F. Golden, and William M. Kelly. This post is part of the Delaware law series, which is cosponsored by the Forum and Corporation Service Company; links to other posts in the series are available here.

Exclusive forum provisions in corporate bylaws and certificates of incorporation are back on the agenda for many companies. We reviewed the trend data in a June 2012 briefing and predicted that few companies would adopt exclusive forum provisions until there was guidance from then-pending litigation in the Delaware Court of Chancery. That guidance came this past June in the form of Chancellor Strine’s decision upholding the validity of board-adopted exclusive forum bylaw provisions at Chevron and FedEx. Most recently the plaintiffs in that litigation dropped their appeal, so for now Chancellor Strine’s decision stands in support of the proposition that, unsurprisingly, Delaware views the selection of a Delaware forum as at least facially valid.

In the wake of these developments the adoption of exclusive forum provisions has resumed, and by our count there are now about 120 companies, largely but not exclusively Delaware corporations, that have gotten on board since the Chevron decision. While these are still small numbers in the context of several thousand U.S. public companies, we expect the number to continue to grow in the coming months.

…continue reading: Exclusive Forum Provisions: Is Now the Time to Act?

Tone at the Top (of the SEC): Tough

Posted by David L. Caplan and Richard J. Sandler, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Tuesday October 8, 2013 at 9:10 am
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Editor’s Note: Richard J. Sandler is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and co-head of the firm’s global corporate governance group, and David L. Caplan is a partner and global co-head of the firm’s mergers and acquisitions practice. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum.

As the fiscal year comes to a close—even while the Securities and Exchange Commission, amidst the government shutdown, continues to fund its operations through a carryover balance from FY 2013—it is a good time to review recent signs of SEC skepticism regarding financial statement reporting practices and the SEC’s current focus on public company officers, directors, and auditors as targets of potential enforcement actions. Since Mary Jo White was confirmed as the new Chairman in April, and George Canellos and Andrew Ceresney were named Co-Directors of the Division of Enforcement later that month, a number of enforcement actions and SEC statements suggest a heightened vigilance, particularly with respect to potential corporate accounting failures.

…continue reading: Tone at the Top (of the SEC): Tough

Compensation Committee and Adviser Implementation Begins July 1, 2013

Posted by David L. Caplan and Richard J. Sandler, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Saturday May 18, 2013 at 10:21 am
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Editor’s Note: Richard J. Sandler is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and co-head of the firm’s global corporate governance group, and David L. Caplan is a partner and global co-head of the firm’s mergers and acquisitions practice. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum.

As discussed in our previous memo, in January 2013, the SEC approved amendments to the NYSE and Nasdaq listing standards relating to compensation committees and their advisers. Unless they have already done so, companies should begin implementing the new requirements with respect to compensation committees and their advisers that take effect on July 1, 2013. Compensation committee action is required in order to comply with these requirements.

Companies should note that, while the new rules require compensation committees to consider the independence of their advisers, the rules do not require that such advisers be independent, nor is any aspect of the mandated independence review required to be disclosed publicly (other than proxy disclosure concerning compensation consultants to a company or its compensation committee).

Companies should also note that this independent assessment applies only to advisers; there will be a separate independence assessment of directors required later, as noted below.

…continue reading: Compensation Committee and Adviser Implementation Begins July 1, 2013

How to Use Social Media for Regulation FD Compliance

Posted by Richard J. Sandler, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Tuesday April 16, 2013 at 9:44 am
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Editor’s Note: Richard J. Sandler is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and co-head of the firm’s global corporate governance group. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum.

Regulation FD, adopted by the SEC in 2000, prohibits “selective disclosure” by requiring public companies to disclose material information through broadly accessible channels. Thirteen years ago, this meant EDGAR filings, press releases and quarterly earnings calls.

The SEC recently issued a report of investigation under Section 21(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 regarding its inquiry into a post by Netflix’s CEO on his personal Facebook page. In the report, the SEC affirmed that a company may use social media to communicate with investors without violating Regulation FD – as long as the company had adequately informed the market that material information would be disclosed in this manner. The report states that whether a company’s social media disclosure satisfies Regulation FD will depend upon the principles outlined in the SEC’s 2008 guidance, Commission Guidance on the Use of Company Web Sites, while recapping that guidance in a way that should make these principles more workable for companies that want to use websites, social media and other evolving communication methods to disclose important information to the market.

…continue reading: How to Use Social Media for Regulation FD Compliance

Recent Developments in Executive Compensation Litigation

Posted by Richard J. Sandler, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Tuesday February 5, 2013 at 10:01 am
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Editor’s Note: Richard J. Sandler is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and co-head of the firm’s global corporate governance group. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum; the full publication, including footnotes, is available here.

I. Introduction

In the current environment and in the wake of Dodd-Frank (and, before that, TARP) mandated rules requiring shareholder advisory votes on executive compensation, shareholder-plaintiffs have more aggressively challenged executive compensation decisions. In recent months, an active plaintiffs’ bar has filed a series of cases, which generally fall into three broad categories:

  • “say-on-pay” litigation;
  • litigation relating to annual proxy disclosure, particularly with respect to equity compensation plans and say-on-pay proposals; and
  • litigation relating to Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code.

While most of these challenges have failed on substantive or procedural grounds or both, some have been more successful, and the plaintiffs’ strategies continue to evolve. Notably, even unsuccessful claims can result in costly disruptions and/or reputational harm, especially where injunctions against annual shareholder meetings are threatened.

In this memorandum, we:

…continue reading: Recent Developments in Executive Compensation Litigation

ISS Proposes 2013 Voting Policy Updates

Posted by Richard J. Sandler, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Wednesday November 7, 2012 at 9:52 am
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Editor’s Note: Richard J. Sandler is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and co-head of the firm’s global corporate governance group. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum.

On Tuesday, October 16, Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS) proposed updates to its proxy voting guidelines for the 2013 proxy season.

ISS’s proposed policy would:

  • Recommend voting against boards of directors who do not act on shareholder proposals that were approved by the vote of a majority of shares cast in the prior year;
  • Revise ISS’s say-on-pay criteria by refining the peer group selection methodology, incorporating “realizable pay” analysis into the qualitative evaluation of pay-for-performance and designating pledging shares as a problematic pay practice;
  • Extend the analysis of golden parachute arrangements to existing and legacy arrangements rather than just new or renewed arrangements; and
  • Provide for a case-by-case assessment of shareholder proposals to link executive compensation to environmental and social “sustainability metrics.”

The proposed updates were open to public comment until October 31, and the final policies are expected to be released in November. While these new policies have not yet been finalized and are subject to revision, it’s not too early for public companies to consider how these changes could affect their ISS profile in the upcoming proxy season.

…continue reading: ISS Proposes 2013 Voting Policy Updates

SEC Legal Bulletin on Shareholder Proposals

Posted by Richard J. Sandler, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Thursday November 1, 2012 at 9:08 am
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Editor’s Note: Richard J. Sandler is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and co-head of the firm’s global corporate governance group. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum.

The SEC recently issued Staff Legal Bulletin No. 14G providing additional guidance on shareholder proposals submitted to companies pursuant to Rule 14a-8. The guidance is in response to several issues that came up during the 2012 proxy season.

Proof of ownership

In a prior bulletin, SLB No.14F, the SEC had reconsidered its view as to who constitutes a “record holder” for purposes of Rule 14a-8 and indicated that only DTC participants may provide adequate proof of ownership for shareholder proponents. Consistent with its no-action letter decisions during 2012, the Staff indicated in this bulletin that it would also view ownership letters from affiliates of DTC participants as satisfying the proof of ownership requirement.

Also, the Staff indicated that a shareholder who holds securities through a securities intermediary that is not a broker or a bank can satisfy Rule 14a-8’s documentation requirement by submitting a proof of ownership letter from that securities intermediary. If the securities intermediary is not a DTC participant or an affiliate of a DTC participant, then the shareholder will also need to obtain a proof of ownership letter from the DTC participant, or an affiliate of the DTC participant, that can verify the holdings of the securities intermediary.

…continue reading: SEC Legal Bulletin on Shareholder Proposals

Securities Offerings During Blackout Periods and Following a Quarter-End

Posted by Richard J. Sandler, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Monday October 15, 2012 at 9:00 am
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Editor’s Note: Richard J. Sandler is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and co-head of the firm’s global corporate governance group. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum.

Many companies voluntarily impose a “blackout period” beginning around the time a quarter ends and continuing through the quarter’s earnings announcement or subsequent 10-Q or 10-K filing. Although the company’s directors and officers are therefore barred by company policy from trading during this period, it may nevertheless be possible for the company or its major stockholders to complete a securities offering on a public or private basis. The existence of a company-imposed blackout period does not, as a legal matter, prevent the company or a major stockholder from selling securities as long as the company is able to meet its duty of disclosure.

This post discusses what factors company management and their underwriters should consider when contemplating a securities offering during a blackout period. We focus particularly on US companies that are already subject to SEC reporting requirements and that are up-to-date with their filings — IPO companies, companies not subject to SEC reporting and companies that are behind in their SEC filings will have additional matters to consider.

A note of caution is appropriate — this post offers a blinking-yellow light, not a green light. In many cases the best course of action will be to schedule the offering after the 10-Q or 10-K is filed. Nevertheless, in a period of rapidly shifting investor receptivity to new issues, a company and its underwriters may decide that the balance of considerations favors moving more quickly to market.

…continue reading: Securities Offerings During Blackout Periods and Following a Quarter-End

SEC Adopts Final Conflict Minerals Rules

Posted by Richard J. Sandler, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Wednesday September 5, 2012 at 9:18 am
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Editor’s Note: Richard J. Sandler is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and co-head of the firm’s global corporate governance group. This post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum, available here.

The SEC voted to implement the Dodd-Frank Act’s reporting requirements relating to “conflict minerals” — cassiterite, columbite-tantalite, gold, wolframite and other minerals determined by the U.S. government to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo or adjoining countries, referred to as the “DRC countries” or “covered countries.” Companies must comply with the final rules for the calendar year beginning January 1, 2013 with the first reports due May 31, 2014.

The final rules adopted contain substantial changes from the SEC’s original proposal in December 2010. Below is a summary of the changes. We will provide a more in-depth analysis of the rules once we have fully analyzed the adopting release.

…continue reading: SEC Adopts Final Conflict Minerals Rules

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