Posts Tagged ‘Swaps entities’

Segregation of Initial Margin Posted in Connection with Uncleared Swaps

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Saturday April 19, 2014 at 9:00 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Leigh R. Fraser, partner and co-head of the hedge funds group at Ropes & Gray LLP, and is based on a Ropes & Gray publication by Ms. Fraser, Isabel K.R. Dische, and Molly Moore.

Pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) Rules 23.702 and 23.703 thereunder (together, the “Rules”), swap dealers are required to notify their counterparties that they have the right to require segregation with a third-party custodian of any initial margin (also known as “independent amounts”) posted to the swap dealer in connection with uncleared swaps. As a result of these new rules, the International Swaps and Derivatives Association (“ISDA”) recently published a form of notification and a set of frequently asked questions regarding these rules. All buy-side entities that trade in uncleared swaps with swap dealers (including buy-side entities that already post their margin with a third-party custodian, such as registered investment companies, and buy-side entities that do not post initial margin) should receive a copy of the notification from their swap dealer counterparties in the coming weeks or months and should plan to respond promptly to the notification in order to avoid any trading disruptions.

…continue reading: Segregation of Initial Margin Posted in Connection with Uncleared Swaps

Why the Market Should Care About Proposed Clearing Agency Requirements

Editor’s Note: Annette Nazareth is a partner in the Financial Institutions Group at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, and a former commissioner at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The following post is based on an article by Ms. Nazareth and Jeffrey T. Dinwoodie that first appeared in Traders Magazine.

On March 12, the SEC issued a 400-page rule proposal that, if adopted as proposed, would impose a multitude of new compliance requirements on The Options Clearing Corporation (“OCC”), The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”), National Securities Clearing Corporation (“NSCC”), Fixed Income Clearing Corporation (“FICC”) and ICE Clear Europe. Since these clearing agencies play a fundamental role in the options, stock, debt, U.S. Treasuries, mortgage-backed securities and credit default swaps markets, the proposed requirements have important implications for banks, broker-dealers and other U.S. securities market participants, as well as securities exchanges, alternative trading systems and other trading venues.

…continue reading: Why the Market Should Care About Proposed Clearing Agency Requirements

Dodd-Frank Rules Impact End-Users of Foreign Exchange Derivatives

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Thursday April 3, 2014 at 9:13 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Michael Occhiolini, partner focusing on corporate finance, corporate law and governance, and derivatives at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, and is based on a WSGR Alert memorandum. The complete publication, including annexes, is available here.

This post is a summary of certain recent developments under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank) that impact corporate end-users of over-the-counter foreign exchange (FX) derivative transactions and should be read in conjunction with the four prior WSGR Alerts on Dodd-Frank FX issues from October 2011, September 2012, February 2013, and July 2013.

Title VII of Dodd-Frank amended the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA) and other federal securities laws to provide a comprehensive new regulatory framework for the treatment of over-the-counter derivatives, which are generally defined as “swaps” under Section 1a(47) of the CEA. Among other things, Dodd-Frank provides for:

…continue reading: Dodd-Frank Rules Impact End-Users of Foreign Exchange Derivatives

CFTC Issues Cross-Border Substituted Compliance Determinations

Posted by Annette L. Nazareth, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Tuesday January 28, 2014 at 9:14 am
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Editor’s Note: Annette Nazareth is a partner in the Financial Institutions Group at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, and a former commissioner at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The following post is based on a Davis Polk client memorandum. The complete publication, including appendices, is available here.

Just one day in advance of the December 21, 2013 expiration of the CFTC’s exemptive order delaying the applicability of some CFTC swap regulations for non-U.S. swap dealers and foreign branches of U.S. swap dealers, the CFTC approved a series of comparability determinations. These comparability determinations will allow CFTC-registered non-U.S. swap dealers and foreign branches of U.S. swap dealers to comply with local requirements rather than the corresponding CFTC rules in cases where substituted compliance is available under the CFTC’s cross-border guidance. [1] The CFTC made comparability determinations for some swap dealer entity-level requirements for Australia, Canada, the European Union (the “EU”), Hong Kong, Japan and Switzerland and for a limited number of transaction-level requirements for the EU and Japan.

…continue reading: CFTC Issues Cross-Border Substituted Compliance Determinations

CFTC Issues Guidance Regarding Cross-Border Swaps

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Friday August 16, 2013 at 8:47 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Joshua Cohn, partner focusing on Derivatives & Structured Products at Mayer Brown LLP, and is based on a Mayer Brown legal update. The complete publication, including footnotes and appendices, is available here.

On July 12, 2013, the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) approved the issuance of an interpretive guidance and policy statement (the “Guidance”) regarding the cross-border application of the swaps provisions of Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”). Although the CFTC may continue to refine its approach to the cross-border regulation of swaps, the Guidance is intended to finalize the proposed interpretive guidance and policy statement issued on July 12, 2012 (the “Proposed Guidance”). Like the Proposed Guidance before it, the Guidance represents the CFTC’s attempt to meet its statutory mandate to (1) regulate swaps that “have a direct and significant connection with activities in, or effect on, commerce of the United States” and (2) prevent the evasion of the swaps provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act.

In brief, the Guidance: (1) defines “US person” and “non-US person,” which are key for applying the CFTC’s extraterritorial framework; (2) establishes the calculation and aggregation methodologies used for determining whether non-US persons engage in swap transactions at levels that trigger swap dealer (“SD”) or major swap participant (“MSP”) registration; (3) categorizes “Entity-Level Requirements” and “Transaction-Level Requirements” and describes their extraterritorial application; (4) discusses the “substituted compliance” framework; and (5) describes the requirements applicable to nonregistered swap participants (“Non-Registrants”).

The CFTC also issued an exemptive order (the “Order”) that effectively provides for the phased implementation of certain aspects of the Guidance. The Order, in many respects, builds upon relief granted in prior CFTC exemptive orders.

…continue reading: CFTC Issues Guidance Regarding Cross-Border Swaps

Cross-Border at the Crossroads: The SEC’s “Middle Ground”

Posted by John Ramsay, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, on Saturday June 1, 2013 at 9:58 am
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Editor’s Note: John Ramsay is acting director of the Division of Trading and Markets at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. This post is based on Mr. Ramsay’s remarks at the New York City Bar Association, available here. The views expressed in the post are those of Mr. Ramsay and do not necessarily reflect those of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Commissioners, or the Staff.

I’d like to describe the Commission’s recent set of proposals on the cross-border regulation of derivatives. First, though, I’ll describe the state of play among international regulators, both in developing their derivatives regimes and in grappling with the thorny cross-border aspects of derivatives trading.

Status of International Regulatory Efforts

Countries are at various stages of implementing their derivatives regimes in response to the G20 commitments.

The U.S. is further along in this effort. The SEC has now proposed substantially all of the rules required by Title VII, and we have adopted the foundational definitional rules and those governing swap clearing agencies standards, among others. The CFTC is further along in the adoption mode and is on track to complete the adoption of their rules later this year.

Other jurisdictions are further behind, which means that it is difficult to assess at this point how similar their requirements may be to those that the U.S. is implementing.

…continue reading: Cross-Border at the Crossroads: The SEC’s “Middle Ground”

SEC Publishes Proposed Rules Regarding Cross-Border Security-Based Swap Transactions

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Friday May 24, 2013 at 9:21 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Robert Buckholz, partner and co-coordinator of the Corporate and Finance Group at Sullivan & Cromwell LLP, and is based on a Sullivan & Cromwell publication.

Yesterday the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) proposed rules and interpretive guidance regarding the application of the U.S. regulatory regime to cross-border security-based swap (“SBS”) transactions. The proposals also address the impact of cross-border SBS transactions on the registration obligations of security-based swap dealers (“SBSDs”), major security-based swap participants (“MSBSPs”), SBS clearing agencies, SBS execution facilities and SBS swap data repositories (“SDRs”).

The proposed rules also would establish a framework of “substituted compliance” under which certain participants in the SBS market may comply with non-U.S. regulatory regimes that the SEC determines to be comparable with U.S. requirements, in lieu of the rules that would otherwise apply to these participants. The proposed rules will be open for comment for 90 days after the date of their publication in the Federal Register.

The SEC separately voted to reopen, for 60 days, the comment period for all rules relating to Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank”) that are not yet final. This 60-day comment period also applies to the related SEC policy statement describing the expected order for these rules to take effect.

The proposing release is more than 600 pages long and requests public comment on numerous topics. This post provides a preliminary outline of a few key aspects of the proposals. We will publish a more detailed memorandum on the proposed rules and interpretive guidance shortly.

…continue reading: SEC Publishes Proposed Rules Regarding Cross-Border Security-Based Swap Transactions

Navigating Key Dodd-Frank Rules Affecting Swaps End Users

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Tuesday April 30, 2013 at 9:22 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Penelope Christophorou, counsel focusing on commercial financing, secured transactions and bankruptcy law at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP. The following post is based on a Cleary Gottlieb memorandum; the full text, including footnotes and appendices, is available here.

Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank”) enacted a new regime of substantive regulation of over-the-counter (“OTC”) derivatives under U.S. securities and commodities laws. Over the course of 2013, many key provisions of Dodd-Frank are being implemented by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (the “CFTC”) with respect to “swaps.” While many of the regime’s requirements focus on “swap dealers” (“SDs”) and “major swap participants” (“MSPs”), commercial entities that enter into OTC derivatives transactions to hedge or mitigate risk, referred to as “end users,” will also become subject to a wide range of substantive requirements.

In particular, end users will need to:

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Implications of New U.S. Derivatives Regulations on End-Users of Swaps

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Wednesday January 16, 2013 at 9:13 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from John White, partner in the Corporate Department and co-chair of the Corporate Governance and Board Advisory practice at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP. This post is based on a Cravath memorandum by William P. Rogers Jr.; the full version, including footnotes, is available here.

Introduction

In the wake of the financial crisis, both the U.S. and the EU have enacted legislation to regulate the “over-the-counter” (“OTC”) swaps market and are in the process of adopting implementing rules that will make such legislation fully effective. In the U.S., Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”), enacted on July 21, 2010, provides for the regulation of the swaps market and grants to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (the “CFTC”) and the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC,” and with the CFTC, each a “Commission” and together, the “Commissions”) broad authority to regulate the swaps market and its principal participants. In the EU, the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (“EMIR”) is expected to become effective during 2013 and will create a regulatory framework for the swaps markets in all EU member states.

…continue reading: Implications of New U.S. Derivatives Regulations on End-Users of Swaps

A Corporate End-User’s Handbook for Dodd-Frank Title VII Compliance

Posted by Noam Noked, co-editor, HLS Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, on Saturday October 13, 2012 at 9:26 am
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Editor’s Note: The following post comes to us from Geoffrey B. Goldman, partner focusing on derivatives and structured products at Shearman & Sterling LLP. This post is an abridged version of a Shearman & Sterling publication, titled A Corporate End-User’s Handbook for Dodd-Frank Title VII Compliance, available in full (including footnotes) here.

I. Introduction

Almost four years after the financial crisis and over two years after the passage of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank”), the overhaul of the US derivatives market is rapidly shifting into the implementation phase. Many of the key elements of Dodd-Frank relating to OTC derivatives will begin to take effect on October 12, 2012, although the CFTC has delayed implementation of some requirements until the beginning of 2013.

Under Dodd-Frank, Swap Dealers, Security-Based Swap Dealers, Major Swap Participants (“MSPs”) and Major Security-Based Swap Participants must register with the CFTC or SEC, as appropriate, and thereafter will be subject to strict regulation. Swap Dealers and MSPs will be required to comply with, among other things, regulations governing minimum margin and capital requirements, mandatory clearing and exchange trading of swaps and security-based swaps, swap reporting and recordkeeping requirements, internal and external business conduct standards and position limits. Even for companies that are not Swap Dealers or MSPs, are predominantly engaged in non-financial activity, and are using swaps or security-based swaps to hedge or mitigate commercial risk (“End-Users”), compliance with Dodd-Frank presents a significant challenge.

…continue reading: A Corporate End-User’s Handbook for Dodd-Frank Title VII Compliance

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