Answering questions about Facebook, Microsoft and Identity

What does the Microsoft “partnership” with Facebook mean for users? I just posted that question, and angles toward some answers, over at Linux Journal. In part the post also addresses Jeremiah Owyang’s post, How Microsoft got their Passport afterall. Jeremiah’s right to worry about What Microsoft is Up To here. He also has a good question about what the Microsoft-Facebook partnership means for Google.

I believe, however, that the solutions that matter most aren’t going to come from big companies. They’ll come from independent developers working at companies large and small — including Microsoft, Google and Facebook. Also from users themselves, who now play roles as producers as well as consumers. (In fact, much of the open source movement is about the demand side supplying itself — “scratching one’s own itch” and all that.)

That’s why I conclude my post with an invitation for Facebook developers to attend the Internet Identity Workshop in Mountain View on December 3-5. The IIW workshops — going on since early 2005 — are among the most productive I’ve ever been to. Great work comes out of them, every time. And we’re going to need it now, becaused we’re sharing enormous amounts of personal and social information online through Facebook and other “social networks”. What’s done with that data should be our concern, and not just the concern of those who make or spend money “targeting” us with better message rifles.

6 comments

  1. Ghillie Suits » Answering questions about Facebook, Microsoft and Identity’s avatar

    [...] Check it out! While looking through the blogosphere we stumbled on an interesting post today.Here’s a quick excerptWhat does the Microsoft “partnership” with Facebook mean for users? I just posted that question, and angles toward some answers, over at Linux Journal . [...]

  2. Jeremiah Owyang’s avatar

    I’m seeking way for advertisers, marketers, AND users to be able to make this happen and work together. Contextual and relevant marketing, but with the control held by users.

    The interesting thing is that most users don’t care or know, and if they do, they won’t do anything about it. Movements happen at the consumer level, and most consumers won’t think bigger.

    Although I’m traveling to Seattle to keynote a Facebook conference that week (ironic huh?) I’ll try to at least attend on Monday for the Internet Identity Workshop.

  3. How Microsoft got their Passport afterall’s avatar

    [...] Harvard’s Berkman center fellow Doc Searls has responded to this post, and points out that Facebook’s users are not it’s customers, He also [...]

  4. TedC’s avatar

    “The interesting thing is that most users don’t care or know, and if they do, they won’t do anything about it.” Isn’t this where marketing comes in? Huge market here.

  5. Aaron Strout’s avatar

    Doc/Jeremiah — I’ll throw out an interesting concept. What if users were empowered to accept whatever ads they were interested in (assuming they were required to see ads like you are today on FB). To be honest, I’d be much more inclined to look at ads presented to me on FB if they were more relevant. I mean 18 old attractive women are nice and all but I’m married and I probably am not buying what they’re selling. ;)

    On a sidenote Doc, I’d love to schedule that podcast we talked about at the Rattlesnake the othernight (the EMC/Jeremiah blogger dinner). You can ping me on FB or my blog:

    http://facebook.com/profile.php?id=629972173
    Blog: http://wearesmarter.org/aaron

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