For older students, parents, musicians, artists, and speakers of other languages

Hi-

As you know, we collect some student demographic data but we don’t capture some of these details so I am sending this to all of you so you can choose to respond as appropriate:

Older Law Students
We want to help to develop community for law students who have come to law school after working or pursuing graduate study in other fields. This group will range in age from late 20s and above but anyone is welcome.  We held an event last spring and the attendees decided to adopt the name OWLS (Older and Wiser Law Students) a name used at other schools.  Please email  dos at law.harvard.edu if you are interested in joining the mailing list.

We’ll hold an OWLS Wine & Cheese Reception
Tuesday, October 4th
4:30-6:30pm
Hark South.

Parents
We have a student group (Parents at the Law School “PALS”) and WLS has a Mothers Network but we would like to compile a complete list because there are a number of times when we want to reach out to students who are parents to announce events of interest.  A parents reception will be held shortly.  Please email  dos at law.harvard.edu if you are interested in joining the mailing list.

Musicians and Artists
We would like to start a list for law student musicians and artists for anything from connecting students for practice/performance opportunities to offering performance/gallery opportunities in the new space.  Please email  dos at law.harvard.edu if you are interested in joining the mailing list and please specify (e.g. play violin, paint) and let us know if we can share your info with other musicians/artists or if you just want to be notified of performance/gallery opportunities.

Languages
If you speak another language and would like to connect with other students for language tables or other events, please email  dos at law.harvard.edu and let us know which language(s) and let us know if we can share your info with other HLS students or if you just want to be notified of language tables.

Thanks!

Ellen M. Cosgrove I Associate Dean & Dean of Students I Harvard Law School I 1563 Massachusetts Ave Cambridge, MA 02138 I (617-495-1881
*  cosgrove at law.harvard.edu I Dean of Students Office Web Page

for older students, parents, musicians, artists, and speakers of other languages

Hi-

As you know, we collect some student demographic data but we don’t capture some of these details so I am sending this to all of you so you can choose to respond as appropriate:

Older Law Students

We want to help to develop community for law students who have come to law school after working or pursuing graduate study in other fields. This group will range in age from late 20s and above but anyone is welcome.  We held an event last spring and the attendees decided to adopt the name OWLS (Older and Wiser Law Students) a name used at other schools.  Please email dos@law.harvard.edu if you are interested in joining the mailing list

We’ll hold an OWLS Wine & Cheese Reception

Tuesday, October 4th

4:30-6:30pm

Hark South.

Parents

We have a student group (Parents at the Law School “PALS”) and WLS has a Mothers Network but we would like to compile a complete list because there are a number of times when we want to reach out to students who are parents to announce events of interest.  A parents reception will be held shortly.  Please email dos@law.harvard.edu if you are interested in joining the mailing list.

Musicians and Artists

We would like to start a list for law student musicians and artists for anything from connecting students for practice/performance opportunities to offering performance/gallery opportunities in the new space.  Please email dos@law.harvard.edu if you are interested in joining the mailing list and please specify (e.g. play violin, paint) and let us know if we can share your info with other musicians/artists or if you just want to be notified of performance/gallery opportunities.

Languages

If you speak another language and would like to connect with other students for language tables or other events, please email dos@law.harvard.edu and let us know which language(s) and let us know if we can share your info with other HLS students or if you just want to be notified of language tables.

Thanks!

Campus Safety, Transportation, Clery Act

Each year, we provide a quick overview of campus safety through an annual email and an annual presentation by members of HUPD.

We offer RAD classes at the law school and several members of the Women’s Law Association have trained as SASH advisers (Sexual Assault Sexual Harassment).  If there is anything you would like to see us do in terms of campus education/training, please email me.

Reported crime at Harvard is relatively low and largely property related.  Please remember that we are located in an urban setting. Therefore, we share many of the safety issues that exist in any city.

Here are some safety updates for 2011-2012:

1.       HUPD’s  SAFETY AND SECURITY TO‐DO‐LIST

In order for the Harvard University Police Department to maintain a safe and secure campus it

needs the help of the community. If you follow the advice below you will be doing your part to ensure your safety as well as the safety of the entire Harvard University community.

Campus Safety, Transportation, Clery Act

Each year, we provide a quick overview of campus safety through an annual email and an annual presentation by members of HUPD.

 

We offer RAD classes at the law school and several members of the Women’s Law Association have trained as SASH advisers (Sexual Assault Sexual Harassment).  If there is anything you would like to see us do in terms of campus education/training, please email me.

 

Reported crime at Harvard is relatively low and largely property related.  Please remember that we are located in an urban setting. Therefore, we share many of the safety issues that exist in any city.

 

Here are some safety updates for 2011-2012:

 

  1. 1.       HUPD’s  Safety and Security ToDoList

 

In order for the Harvard University Police Department to maintain a safe and secure campus it

needs the help of the community. If you follow the advice below you will be doing your part to

ensure your safety as well as the safety of the entire Harvard University community.

 

Barry Schwartz Lecture in Ames

As Dean Minow mentioned in her email, we are kicking off the Living Well in the Law Initiative this afternoon.

Please join us at 5pm in Ames to hear Barry Schwartz, Professor of Social Theory and Social Action, Swarthmore College speak on Practical Wisdom:  The Right way to do the Right Thing.  Dinner will be served.

 

Prof Schwartz is author of a number of books including:

 

The Paradox of Choice

As Americans, we assume that more choice means better options and greater satisfaction. But beware of excessive choice: choice overload can make you question the decisions you make before you even make them, it can set you up for unrealistically high expectations, and it can make you blame yourself for any and all failures. In the long run, this can lead to decision-making paralysis. And in a culture that tells us that there is no excuse for falling short of perfection when your options are limitless, too much choice can lead to clinical depression.

 

The Costs of Living: How Market Freedom Erodes the Best Things in Life

Americans have come to view more and more of their lives in free-market, economic terms. Market thinking has permeated education, the professions, sports, family and friendship, and politics. This book presents a criticism of this market view of life, arguing that most of what is good about education, medicine, law, sports, love, friendship, and democratic politics is undermined if the market gets too close to them. Indeed, even the market stops working if people behave in it in the way that economists say people always behave. Thus, the book argues, the market erodes the best things in life, and must be restrained, not encouraged, in its movement into places where it doesn’t belong. The book is aimed at a non-professional audience.

The Battle for Human Nature: Science, Morality and Modern Life

This book presents the view of human nature as entirely governed by self-interest that is shared by the disciplines of evolutionary biology, neoclassical economics, and behavioral psychology. It shows what these disciplines have in common in their approach to understanding human nature, and contrasts their view with most people’s everyday conceptions of what human nature is like. After presenting the theoretical perspectives of each of these disciples, the book turns a critical eye on them, and argues that their views are at best limited, and often simply wrong. However, the book finally argues, we cannot expect the errors of these disciplines to be self-correcting, for if people and the social institutions they live within come to believe these disciplines, then our social lives will come to look more and more like a confirmation of the picture of human nature that they paint. The last two chapters of the book sketch a picture of the mean-spirited world that would result if we took these disciplines to be telling us the truth about human beings. The style of the book is aimed at educated non-professionals

You can read more at  cosgrove@law.harvard.edu I Dean of Students Office Web Page

 

Bar Exam Information

TODAY at noon, the President of the Massachusetts Board of Law Examiners (Geoffrey Bok ’87) and the Executive Director, Marilyn Wellington, will provide insight into the Character & Fitness process from the Board’s perspective.

The session will take place in Austin West at noon and lunch will be served.

Since many states ask similar questions, you will find this session to be useful regardless of the state.

 

Commencement and the Bar Exam

Welcome to 3L year!

As you start this victory lap in your academic career, I want to share a few bits of important information about Commencement and the Bar Exam.

COMMENCEMENT J

The Commencement Link is at www.law.harvard.edu

This should give you some basic information as you prepare for the big day.  The pages will be updated as the year progresses.

Things to do now:

1.       read the page so you are familiar with the three ceremonies and the ticketing policies for each
2.       If you haven’t yet made hotel reservations, you should do that as soon as possible.  Since the area is a big traffic jam on Class Day and Commencement Day, we encourage students to encourage guests to take the T and to look for hotels in Cambridge and Boston that are convenient to a T station.
3.       Pass the commencement link along to guests.  It will save you a lot of time.

Once we get back from Spring Break, we will start sending weekly emails to let you know everything you need to do at that time (tickets, regalia, etc).

BAR EXAM L

The Bar Exam link is at: www.law.harvard.edu

The process includes:

1.       applying to sit for the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) and taking the MPRE
2.       applying to sit for the Bar Exam and taking the Bar Exam
3.       completing your state’s character and fitness process

You apply for admission through your state Board of Bar Examiners. Deadlines, forms, and requirements differ from state to state.   To get a sense of the structure of the Bar Exam as well as the deadlines and requirements for your state, go to: www.ncbex.org
Most deadlines are in the winter and spring but some states have fall deadlines so check now.

Because the processes varies so much by state, you will not receive emails from us about upcoming deadlines so it is really important to bookmark your state Bar page. You should check your state Bar page often as deadlines and requirements can change throughout the year and the state committees are not flexible about waiving requirements.

BAR INFO SESSIONS

On Wednesday, September 21st at noon, the President of the Massachusetts Board of Law Examiners (Geoffrey Bok ’87) and the Executive Director, Marilyn Wellington, will provide insight into the Character & Fitness process from the Board’s perspective.  Since many states ask similar questions, you will find this session to be useful regardless of the state.

Each year the Dean of Students Office co-sponsors a number of other information sessions on the Bar exam including the application process and the Character & Fitness process.  Speakers generally include representatives from Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers and some of the major Bar Prep Courses.  Other sessions will follow in the fall and spring so check the calendar.

These sessions will not be taped.  If you miss the sessions, you can drop by the tables in the Hark when the Bar Review companies are on site.

BAR REVIEW CLASSES

Reps from various Bar Review Courses will be in the Hark during the school year.  The Law School doesn’t endorse any particular company but we encourage you to speak with recent grads and employers to get recommendations

MPRE

The MPRE is required for admission to the bars of most US jurisdictions. The MPRE is based on the law governing the conduct of lawyers. It consists of 50 multiple-choice questions and takes two hours.

The examination is administered three times per year:
November 5, 2011 (deadline to register is September 20)
March 17, 2012
August 10, 2012
Most HLS students sit in November or March

MPRE Links:

 www.ncbex.org links to each individual state’s bar exam info

CHARACTER & FITNESS PROCESS

In addition to the examinations, each applicant is required to produce evidence that s/he is a person of honest demeanor and good moral character and possesses the requisite fitness to perform the obligations and responsibilities of a practicing attorney at law.

Be prepared to list specifics of every place you have lived since you turned 18, every job you have held (with contacts to confirm employment), every speeding ticket, any disciplinary action in school, any arrest or criminal charge along with full details of the incident.  When in doubt, disclose.  Please start assembling the documents now because this process can be time consuming.  If you are concerned about having to disclose something from your past, you can see me or you can contact Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers LCL is a lawyers assistance program funded by bar dues.

FAQs:

Where do I send my Dean’s Certification form and my handwriting sample?
Registrar’s Office.

How do I get fingerprints?
Through the Harvard University Police Department

Who can I use as a reference?
You can ask friends (including college roommates and law school friends), former colleagues, family friends, anyone who knows you well.  Unless specified, they need not have worked with you and they need not be an attorney.

If my state requires an attorney as a reference and I don’t know any attorneys well enough to ask, what should I do?
Keep in mind that last year’s 3Ls are this year’s attorneys so you can ask them, you can ask a member of the faculty or staff who is a member of the bar.  I am always happy to serve as an attorney reference if you need one.

What do I do if I can’t figure out how to confirm my previous employment?
If you don’t know anyone who works there anymore – Contact Human Resources.  They can provide the information.
If the organization merged – Contact Human Resources at the successor organization

What do I have to disclose about disciplinary conduct from college or law school?
HLS discloses disciplinary matters that were sent to the Administrative Board.  If you have any questions about this, see me.
You should check with your college to see what their disclosure policies are.
Generally, something that generated a written record or something that carried a sanction of some sort should be reported.

What do I have to disclose about any previous interaction with the criminal system?
The Law School asks about felony and misdemeanor convictions only so you may have to disclose something to the Bar that you didn’t disclose to us (including juvenile criminal conduct and convictions that were expunged).  The questions generally require that you disclose any interaction you have had with the criminal system, regardless of the timing or the outcome.

What do I have to disclose about mental illness or substance abuse?
For the majority of states, you only have to disclose an incapacity due to mental illness or substance abuse.  If you have specific questions, you can contact Lawyers Concerns for Lawyers or see me.

Do parking tickets really matter?
Unpaid tickets must reported.  Pay them.  If you do not remember where you have tickets, contact likely states.  Unpaid parking tickets are generally available through the Department of Motor Vehicles websites.

What about speeding tickets and other moving violations?
Generally, those must be disclosed regardless of whether they are paid.  You can request your history through the DMV or the Secretary of State’s office.  Check states where a violation occurred as well as states where your car was registered.

What if I cannot find the information to answer a question?
Make a good faith effort and document that.  Explain what you did to track down the information and then provide as detailed an answer as you can.

What if I have to disclose something to the Bar that I didn’t disclose to HLS?
The Bar often looks for inconsistencies between your HLS application and your Bar application.
Request a copy of your application from the Registrar.
If you should have disclosed something to Harvard and you didn’t, make an appointment to see me.
If you were not required to disclose it to Harvard, make a note of that in your answer to the Bar.

I’m always happy to meet if you have any additional questions.  Thanks.

A conversation with Justice Kagan

Reminder:

A Conversation with U.S. Supreme Court Justice, and former HLS Dean, Elena Kagan.

Dean Minow will moderate the conversation today at 5pm in the Ames Courtroom. Overflow seating will be available in Austin North, East, and West.

Please note:  space is limited in the courtroom as well as the overflow rooms. Seating will be available on a first come, first served basis and will begin at 4:00pm.  A Harvard ID will be required for admission to the lecture and no backpacks, cellphones, laptops, recording devices, cameras, food, or drink will be allowed in the courtroom or overflow rooms.

A reception will follow.

A Conversation With Justice Kagan

Dean Minow will moderate the conversation today at 5pm in the Ames Courtroom.  Overflow seating will be available in Austin North, East, and West.

Please note:  space is limited in the courtroom as well as the overflow rooms. Seating will be available on a first come, first served basis and will begin at 4:00pm.  A Harvard ID will be required for admission to the lecture and no backpacks, cellphones, laptops, recording devices, cameras, food, or drink will be allowed in the courtroom or overflow rooms.

A reception will follow.

Character and Fitness for Bar Application

In order to become a member of a Bar, each applicant is required to produce evidence that s/he is a person of honest demeanor and good moral character and possesses the requisite fitness to perform the obligations and responsibilities of a practicing attorney at law. All applicants go through a Character & Fitness process during their 3L year where they disclose a good deal of information about their past.

TODAY at noon, the President of the Massachusetts Board of Law Examiners (Geoffrey Bok ’87) and the Executive Director, Marilyn Wellington, will provide insight into the Character & Fitness process from the Board’s perspective. The session will take place in Austin West at noon and lunch will be served. Since many states ask similar questions, you will find this session to be useful regardless of the state.

While your application process is still a year or two away, you may find this session useful in preparing your application.

For more information about the character and fitness process, please go to:

 cosgrove at law.harvard.edu I Dean of Students Office Web Page