f/k/a . . . the archives

September 26, 2004

how do you spell Cat?

Filed under: pre-06-2006 — David Giacalone @ 1:01 pm

blackboard abc


one-breath pundit  







    • Time magazine reports that a spelling error caused the deportation of Yusuf Islam, f/k/a Cat Stevens, perhaps confirming our doubts:




“According to aviation sources with access to the list, there is no Yusuf Islam on the no-fly registry, though there is a “Youssouf Islam.” The incorrect name was added to the register this summer, but because Islam’s name is spelled “Yusuf” on his British passport, he was allowed to board a plane in London.” (emphasis added)


the gang that couldn’t spell strait!





    • Update (8 PM): Dan Carlson of the Indianapolis Star has an interesting column today, titled “Followed by a goon shadow.” Carlson says






    • “They can’t find Osama bin Laden, but they’ve saved us from Cat Stevens.”


    • “Tied to terrorists? Well, “ties” can be about anything when the government doesn’t have to spell them out.”


    • “Is this the world’s mightiest force for liberty going about its noble work, or is this Colonel Klink of Stalag 13 with computers and opinion polls?”




  • p.s. to UCL:  I promise not to gloat about this until all (or enough of) the facts are in.




 from Kobayashi Issa:  

 

the stray cat also
picks this inn…
bush clover blooming

 







I sing the praises
of my fly-catching
housecat!

translated by David G. Lanoue 











. . . . . . .  cat stevens

2 Comments

  1. I’m certainly not one to hesitate to treat our government’s judgment with cynicism, as evidenced by my suspicions of what they did to Brandon Mayfield well before the media ever announced he was innocent:

    http://uncivillitigator.blogspot.com/2004/05/brandon-mayfield.html

    That said, there is a fundamental difference between the accused persons in my post and Mr. Islam: the former are Americans, and they did nothing wrong. Still, there is a legal right to generally support the murder of innocent people within the United States (subject to the criminal law of threats, extortion, etc., of course). But there is no legal right for a non-American to generally support the murder of innocent people when you are not an American and expect free entrance to our borders. As long as he fails to persuade me that his position on Salman Rushdie was wrong, in every sense of the word, I support the ban on his entry to this country.

    Comment by UCL — September 27, 2004 @ 1:35 am

  2. I’m certainly not one to hesitate to treat our government’s judgment with cynicism, as evidenced by my suspicions of what they did to Brandon Mayfield well before the media ever announced he was innocent:

    http://uncivillitigator.blogspot.com/2004/05/brandon-mayfield.html

    That said, there is a fundamental difference between the accused persons in my post and Mr. Islam: the former are Americans, and they did nothing wrong. Still, there is a legal right to generally support the murder of innocent people within the United States (subject to the criminal law of threats, extortion, etc., of course). But there is no legal right for a non-American to generally support the murder of innocent people when you are not an American and expect free entrance to our borders. As long as he fails to persuade me that his position on Salman Rushdie was wrong, in every sense of the word, I support the ban on his entry to this country.

    Comment by UCL — September 27, 2004 @ 1:35 am

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