f/k/a . . . the archives

March 22, 2005

playing ball with ed

Filed under: pre-06-2006 — David Giacalone @ 9:49 pm

After yesteday’s sneak preview, and his matinee performance this afternoon, 

it’s time for me to tell you about Ed Markowski.  I think I’ve been procrastinating

so much with this introduction, because there’s just too many things I want to

say about Ed’s work.  For example:




  1. I can’t believe that no publisher has yet put together a full-length   bocci

    volume of the work of this accomplished and prolific haijin.   




  2. I’m touched by Ed’s ability to present the joys and dignity of

    blue-collar life, and the romance found in the mundane

    moments of married life.





  3. In addition to sharing samples from the body of fine 3-line haiku

    that Ed has penned, I want to expose visitors to this site to his

    “non-traditional” spacing and lineation.  They demonstrate how

    the haiku spirit can dwell in shapes that are far different than our

    grammar school notions of 5 – 7- 5.  [see yesterday's examples]

 

I can’t say if Erin Harte knew Issue 10 of her Haiku Sun e-zine would be its

last, but I know she chose well in dedicating the entire issue to the work of

Ed Markowski.  Her explanation for the choice is one we can echo:


 “In celebration of the new year, Haiku Sun is proud to feature the

Asian inspired poetry of Ed Markowski. Regular readers will be

familiar with Ed’s work. We can think of no better way to ring in

2004 than with an issue solely dedicated to this talented poet/ haijin

and his work. His ability to “push the envelope” of conventional Asian

form while staying true to its essence is what Haiku Sun is all about!

Enjoy Ed’s haiku, senryu, tanka, haibun and, as always, a few surprises.”

at bat neg  As usual, I’ve said too much.   Get to know Ed Markowski from his haiku.

You’ll be glad you did (even if you have to tilt your head a little).

 

 

 




bases loaded

no one out…..

 

the pitcher

blows a bubble

 

 

 

 

lifting her spoon…

parting her lips…

a sudden             shift

in my appetite

 

 



 

 

panties   stillangry?atoppositeendsoftheclothesline   boxers

 

 

 

                                                       – the above are from Sun Haiku (Issue X, Jan. 2004)  seesaw

 

 

 

 

 



summer loneliness . . .

dropping the pop up

i toss to myself

 

                    (from the pinch-book pop up
                                    tribe press, 2004)



 

 

 

 

assemblylinespotweldersweldingshouldertoshoulder

 

                                                 (from roadrunner, V:1)

 

 

 

Quick Bio: Ed Markowski lives and writes in Auburn Hills, Michigan, and

is a lifelong Detroit Tigers fan (can you feel his pain?), as well as a loving

husband, father and grandfather.  Click here to share his love of baseball.

 

potluck



tiny check  When Prof. Bainbridge complained last weekend about excessive wine

government regulation in California (concerning supposed “dangers” from wild

mushrooms), Prof. Yabut said to himself, “Yeah, but, I bet Steve would

feel differently about wine-related consumer protection.”  Well, looks

like Prof. B. is indeed no libertarian when it comes to Wine Labels.

Are consumers really going to mistake wine from “two buck rip-off artists”

for the highclass Napa Valley wines whose honor Steve wants to uphold?  

And, is Parma, Italy, right to be irked over American-made “parmesan” cheese?

[March 23, 2005:  Check our comments section for a good debate -- John Steele

thinks Prof. B. is being consistent; Your Editor replies.  Please join in.]    

 

 

9 Comments

  1. Not sure I agree with you on this one. A libertarian is likely to espouse, “give the market accurate information and let the market take care of itself.” Prof Bainbridge is consistent if we assume that using “Napa” for non-Napa products is misleading to consumers.

    Comment by John Steele — March 23, 2005 @ 11:03 am

  2. Not sure I agree with you on this one. A libertarian is likely to espouse, “give the market accurate information and let the market take care of itself.” Prof Bainbridge is consistent if we assume that using “Napa” for non-Napa products is misleading to consumers.

    Comment by John Steele — March 23, 2005 @ 11:03 am

  3. You’re doing a lot of assuming, John.   I think libertarians are far more likely to be laissez faire (and “buyer-beware”) about issues like this, or at least very minimalist about how much information is mandated, especially where — as here — the information about the georgraphic source of the wine does appear on the label to correct any misunderstanding due to the brand name.   As the California Supreme Court notes in Bronco Wines v. Jerry R. Jolly, the

    “grandfather clause” appended to the federal regulation exempts from the federal regulation’s prohibition an otherwise misleading geographic brand name if the brand name was in use prior to July 7, 1986, and the front label also discloses the true  geographic source of the grapes used to make the wine contained in the bottle. (Id.,

    Comment by David Giacalone — March 23, 2005 @ 11:56 am

  4. You’re doing a lot of assuming, John.   I think libertarians are far more likely to be laissez faire (and “buyer-beware”) about issues like this, or at least very minimalist about how much information is mandated, especially where — as here — the information about the georgraphic source of the wine does appear on the label to correct any misunderstanding due to the brand name.   As the California Supreme Court notes in Bronco Wines v. Jerry R. Jolly, the

    “grandfather clause” appended to the federal regulation exempts from the federal regulation’s prohibition an otherwise misleading geographic brand name if the brand name was in use prior to July 7, 1986, and the front label also discloses the true  geographic source of the grapes used to make the wine contained in the bottle. (Id.,

    Comment by David Giacalone — March 23, 2005 @ 11:56 am

  5. I think a libertarian might say that information regulation is not the province of the state. The market can develop secondary certification sources. Car Max, for example, certifies that its brand of previously used cars is different and better than Joe’s Auto and Hairstyling Salon’s used cars. Others can produce information to help consumers make more informed decisions. The only problem is that this is likely to be more costly than if the government makes a rule that allows for private fraud actions against a fraudulent grape monger. Economists would say use the market if the market can provide a lower cost of information provision than the government. If the government can do it cheaper, then certain information regulation make sense. On the 3rd hand (heh), if the government does have an advantage in providing for information regulation right now, the government has little incentive to keep up with the times and allow for innovation in the regulation. This might not be a problem with wine, but it is a problem with other types of information regulation (for example, who can practice law and what is the unlicensed practice of law!)

    Comment by Martin — March 23, 2005 @ 4:22 pm

  6. I think a libertarian might say that information regulation is not the province of the state. The market can develop secondary certification sources. Car Max, for example, certifies that its brand of previously used cars is different and better than Joe’s Auto and Hairstyling Salon’s used cars. Others can produce information to help consumers make more informed decisions. The only problem is that this is likely to be more costly than if the government makes a rule that allows for private fraud actions against a fraudulent grape monger. Economists would say use the market if the market can provide a lower cost of information provision than the government. If the government can do it cheaper, then certain information regulation make sense. On the 3rd hand (heh), if the government does have an advantage in providing for information regulation right now, the government has little incentive to keep up with the times and allow for innovation in the regulation. This might not be a problem with wine, but it is a problem with other types of information regulation (for example, who can practice law and what is the unlicensed practice of law!)

    Comment by Martin — March 23, 2005 @ 4:22 pm

  7. As usual, you have helped us all think more clearly.  Thanks, Martin.

    Comment by David Giacalone — March 23, 2005 @ 6:56 pm

  8. As usual, you have helped us all think more clearly.  Thanks, Martin.

    Comment by David Giacalone — March 23, 2005 @ 6:56 pm

  9. Thank you! It is refreshing to see another viewpoint on regulation in the wine industry!

    Comment by Keith Wallace, American Wine Foundation — November 18, 2006 @ 1:30 pm

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