f/k/a . . . the archives

June 14, 2005

not enough fireflies (too much spam)

Filed under: pre-06-2006 — David Giacalone @ 5:00 pm


 







9 PM bonus:



small talk

at the end of a long day

fireflies

 

          Ed Markowski 

 

 

more darkness

more fireflies–

more darkness than fireflies

 

 

 

“galaxyN”


 

 

 

 

the nail sinking in–

my father’s hammer

in my hand

 

 

 

 

 

 

 






nowhere else

but the next flower –

afternoon butterfly

 

 


 

 

butterflyN   Gary Hotham 



“the nail sinking in– tug of the current (HSA Anthology 2004)


nowhere else” -  The Heron’s Nest (May 2004)

 



 

 

 


by dagosan: 


the fireflies

are no-shows –

the mosquitos keep working




                     [June 14, 2005]

potluck



tiny check  The Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA) loves to say they   “$key small”

fight for the little guy. You can click here to sign up for their “Protecting

Your Rights” e-letter, where you’ll “read the stories of everyday Americans

who used the courts to stand up to negligence, malpractice, or greed.”  But,

it seems, you better not be too everyday — a Crain’s Cleveland article

(June 13, 2005) says the $500,000 cap on medical malpractice punitive

damages has forced trial lawyers to “turn low- income clients away because

those individuals cannot generate enough in the way of economic damages,

which are not capped, to justify going to court.”  If it quacks like a greedy

huckster and walks like a greedy huckster, folks, I’m betting it’s a greedy

shyster. [thanks to RiskProf for the pointer] See our prior post, where

skepticalEsq said:


Let me see if I understand this:  Just when “fair verdicts” will be

especially hard and victims need devoted p/i lawyers more than

ever to fight for every penny they deserve, firms are deciding to

stop taking malpractice cases due to “financial considerations” 

like “decreasing fees.”   Seems to me, the Trial Lawyers’ Association

needs to do a little better spin control and pr training within its own

ranks, before the public starts to think that 25% of the first half million

dollars in non-economic damages is just too trifling an amount to attract

a good p/i lawyer.  We wouldn’t want Americans to get unduly cynical

about their lawyers.

 

afterthought: Back on April 1, 2005, ethicalEsq, Prof. Yabut and Jack Cliente

went to Legal Consumer Heaven, where the ethics rules are actually applied to

lawyer fees.  In the dream, ATLA Condemns the Standard Contingency Fee, and


55 limit  Using a little Dave Barry humor, Prof. Bainbridge points to an article

confirming what we all knew: “42 states allow drivers to regularly exceed the speed

limit before they are stopped.” (Yahoo/AP, Survey: Most States Allow Speed Cushion ). 

The article cites a 1999 study showing a 15% increase in highway deaths when the limits

were raised from 55 to 65 — speed really does kill.  Also, as we reported on May 2nd,

“driving at 10 miles an hour above the 65 miles-per-hour limit increases fuel consumption

by 15 percent.” (See NYT, “Unmentioned Energy Fix: A 55 M.P.H. Speed Limit,” May

1, 2005)  Hmm.  Enforcing the speed laws, or dropping the speed limit back to 55, would

save a lot of lives and a lot of gasoline.  As selfish as Americans are, do you think our

political leaders — perhaps with a push from both conservative Catholics and liberal

secularists — will ever have the courage to do the right thing?   Is Robert K. Kaufman of

Boston University right that anything involving personal sacrifice is “off the table politically“?

 

 

tiny check I’d like to join with Evan Schaeffer and tell lawyer Christopher King that his Comment

Spam — such as here — is not welcome at this website.  Mr. King, feel free to leave

Comments that are on-topic, but please use your own website to promote your pet

peeves.   Of course, neither is any other kinds of comment spam welcome

(that means you, cialis sellers).

 

 

fireflyG  Weather Kvetsch:  I’m not liking our string of 90-degree-very-humid days, here

in the NYS Capital Region.  My body will deal with it.  My psyche, however, is not

at all pleased with the delay in the firefly season, due to a cold and wet spring.  Please

pass this message on to the Responsible Authorities.

 

 






planting a willow
will becomes nights
of fireflies

 

 

 

the dog sparkling
with fireflies
sound asleep


 

Click for more than 100 firefly haiku by Issa,

translated by David G. Lanoue

                                                                                                                                                                  fireflyN fireflyN  

 


 

 

 

12 Comments

  1. David:

    You need to move south for June. We have had the best firefly season in quite a while. What is the difference between a firefly and a lightning bug anyway?

    Comment by Martin — June 14, 2005 @ 6:07 pm

  2. David:

    You need to move south for June. We have had the best firefly season in quite a while. What is the difference between a firefly and a lightning bug anyway?

    Comment by Martin — June 14, 2005 @ 6:07 pm

  3. My friends in the D.C. Area told me over the weekend that the fireflies haven’t arrived there yet.
    I’m not sure that I should be enabling your MIDS — mundane informational dependence syndrome – by answering a question that is so easily answered on the internet, but I’m a sucker for a chance to share information (after first clarifying it in my mind).  Here’s what The American Heritage Dictionary says under “lighting bug

    “Although firefly remains the literary and formal word, lightning bug is the term used by the majority of Americans for the slow-moving flying insect that flashes in the dark. Nearly 80 percent of those interviewed for the Dictionary of American Regional English volunteered lightning bug, while not quite 30 percent said firefly (including those who said both). Only in the northernmost states, especially New England, and along the Pacific coast, does firefly hold its own with lightning bug. Bug itself is nowadays an American term; since the 18th century, the British have preferred insect.”

    Growing up in Upstate New York, I’ve always called them fireflies.  When I was visiting in DC at the end of June last year, I saw the most spectacular firefly displays of my life.  I did have the “lightning bug” discussion with a woman from Georgia.
    I was inspired back then to pen:

    late-comers:
    fireflies join
    the solstice party
     
                                   [dag, 06-20-04]   
     

    summer blockbuster
    fireflies outdo
    Spielberg
     
              [dag, 06-24-04]

    Comment by David Giacalone — June 14, 2005 @ 6:48 pm

  4. My friends in the D.C. Area told me over the weekend that the fireflies haven’t arrived there yet.
    I’m not sure that I should be enabling your MIDS — mundane informational dependence syndrome – by answering a question that is so easily answered on the internet, but I’m a sucker for a chance to share information (after first clarifying it in my mind).  Here’s what The American Heritage Dictionary says under “lighting bug

    “Although firefly remains the literary and formal word, lightning bug is the term used by the majority of Americans for the slow-moving flying insect that flashes in the dark. Nearly 80 percent of those interviewed for the Dictionary of American Regional English volunteered lightning bug, while not quite 30 percent said firefly (including those who said both). Only in the northernmost states, especially New England, and along the Pacific coast, does firefly hold its own with lightning bug. Bug itself is nowadays an American term; since the 18th century, the British have preferred insect.”

    Growing up in Upstate New York, I’ve always called them fireflies.  When I was visiting in DC at the end of June last year, I saw the most spectacular firefly displays of my life.  I did have the “lightning bug” discussion with a woman from Georgia.
    I was inspired back then to pen:

    late-comers:
    fireflies join
    the solstice party
     
                                   [dag, 06-20-04]   
     

    summer blockbuster
    fireflies outdo
    Spielberg
     
              [dag, 06-24-04]

    Comment by David Giacalone — June 14, 2005 @ 6:48 pm

  5. dave, have been off line at home due to many resposibilities. am writing this from work on my lunch break so no pressing matters to tend to right now. saw your piece in frogpond, good one at that. you’ve got a bright future in this haiku world. as for fireflies, well in michigan we call them fireflies. can’t recall too many people using lightning bugs.
     
    a few new pieces from my neck of the woods.
    ed

    thunder
    the migrant workers
    never look up
     
     
     

    small town news
    just enough paper
    to cover the wino

     
     
     
    city sunset
    two men prowl the ruins
    of a burned out house
     
     
     

    june heat
    the artist’s sketch
    of the rapist’s face

     
     
     
    tunnel of love
    she props the stuffed frog
    between us
     
     
     

    small talk
    at the end of a long day
    fireflies

    Comment by ed markowski — June 14, 2005 @ 7:50 pm

  6. dave, have been off line at home due to many resposibilities. am writing this from work on my lunch break so no pressing matters to tend to right now. saw your piece in frogpond, good one at that. you’ve got a bright future in this haiku world. as for fireflies, well in michigan we call them fireflies. can’t recall too many people using lightning bugs.
     
    a few new pieces from my neck of the woods.
    ed

    thunder
    the migrant workers
    never look up
     
     
     

    small town news
    just enough paper
    to cover the wino

     
     
     
    city sunset
    two men prowl the ruins
    of a burned out house
     
     
     

    june heat
    the artist’s sketch
    of the rapist’s face

     
     
     
    tunnel of love
    she props the stuffed frog
    between us
     
     
     

    small talk
    at the end of a long day
    fireflies

    Comment by ed markowski — June 14, 2005 @ 7:50 pm

  7. Hi, Ed,   Thanks for checking in from your workplace.  As usual, I appreciate your kind words about my haiku.
    Your gift of poetry today is an excellent one and much appreciated.  I couldn’t tell how you meant for them to be formatted, so I edited them into 3-lines each.   I’m always amazed at how prolific you are, while I try my best to eke out one semi-presentable, tiny poem a day. 
    I’m going to shift today’s haiku from you to the homepage very soon —  handful of clear, sharp images, and moments experienced, remembered, imagined.

    Comment by David Giacalone — June 14, 2005 @ 10:28 pm

  8. Hi, Ed,   Thanks for checking in from your workplace.  As usual, I appreciate your kind words about my haiku.
    Your gift of poetry today is an excellent one and much appreciated.  I couldn’t tell how you meant for them to be formatted, so I edited them into 3-lines each.   I’m always amazed at how prolific you are, while I try my best to eke out one semi-presentable, tiny poem a day. 
    I’m going to shift today’s haiku from you to the homepage very soon —  handful of clear, sharp images, and moments experienced, remembered, imagined.

    Comment by David Giacalone — June 14, 2005 @ 10:28 pm

  9. If you add up the number of hours lost to slower speed limits, they far exceed the number of hours lost to additional accidents from faster speed limits. I shouldn’t be slowed down because so many people don’t know how to drive. And if you’re concerned about gas mileage, get a Prius, like I did.

    Comment by Ted — June 20, 2005 @ 5:38 pm

  10. If you add up the number of hours lost to slower speed limits, they far exceed the number of hours lost to additional accidents from faster speed limits. I shouldn’t be slowed down because so many people don’t know how to drive. And if you’re concerned about gas mileage, get a Prius, like I did.

    Comment by Ted — June 20, 2005 @ 5:38 pm

  11. Hi, Ted.  Just two questions: (1)  How many hours are “lost” by the extra dead people?  (2) In a land where only a relatively few chose fuel economy over ego-driven-hyperconsumption, why should society leave important issues like fuel dependency and fuel mileage to individual choice?

    Comment by David Giacalone — June 20, 2005 @ 5:52 pm

  12. Hi, Ted.  Just two questions: (1)  How many hours are “lost” by the extra dead people?  (2) In a land where only a relatively few chose fuel economy over ego-driven-hyperconsumption, why should society leave important issues like fuel dependency and fuel mileage to individual choice?

    Comment by David Giacalone — June 20, 2005 @ 5:52 pm

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