f/k/a . . . the archives

February 28, 2006

too much to read, too much to write

Filed under: pre-06-2006 — David Giacalone @ 1:42 am


I may have to stop reading Blawg Review every week. No, it’s not

because of its cutesy title.  It’s far more practical: The darn “carnival”

of law-related weblogs keeps adding to my to-do list of things to read

– and then, naturally, of things to write — at a pace that can never be

accomplished.

 

computer weary

 

For example, Sean Sirrine hosted Blawg Review #46 at DeNovo this

week, and there are simply too many recent postings that sound inter-

esting and/or entertaining, not to mention the must-reads.  (Go, see for 

yourself.)  I used to hope that Blawg Review would introduce me to one

brand new weblog each week.  Now, to be honest, I hope it tempts me

to read no more than one or two postings each week. 

 

This week, I’m going to check out Bruce MacEwen’s look at 

BigLaw in 2015, at Adam Smith Esq. and follow the pointers

at David Jacobson’s Other Interests weblog, regarding the

lack of optimism among lawyers. (By the way, David surely

doesn’t have to worry about low-esteem — check out his

About page and “signature strengths.”)


carCoupeG However, I wish I hadn’t clicked on the AutoMuse

link at BR #46.  To save myself aggravation, I am going to refrain

from explaining antitrust law, competition policy, monopoly 

power, conspiracy theory and consumer choice and welfare,

to E.L. Eversman, who seems to be a little confused in a post on


weblog can educate old E.L. — including pointing out why the issues

raised are not really caused by the McCarran-Ferguson Act’s antitrust

exemption for the business of insurance.  This former antitrust lawyer

(who spent a lot of time trying to get rid of that exemption) just hasn’t

got the time or the energy.

 

Link Love?  No thanks.  Before leaving the topic of Blawg Review, I want to

respond to Sean Sirrine’s plea that we all start “giving out permanent links” to

eachother again.  Sean wants us to put more weblogs on Blog Rolls, when we see

a post that is well done.  He likens the process to tipping for good service. 

 

Sorry, it’s not for me.  Perhaps it was because Blog Rolls seemed so gimmicky

when I started weblogging (meant to create a clubby feel and to goose search engine

placement), but I have never had one and don’t plan to start.  As the number of law

weblogs multiplied, it became impractical to keep a list of every weblog that seemed

worth a look.  And, once a list is started, pruning out the deadwood becomes rather

touchy, and distinguishing between their quality and scope is impossible.

 

                                                                                                laptop in bed

 

Sean worries about law-oriented weblogs becoming static and “talking about the

same things,” but I still see lots of topics and choices — while wanting the best

weblogs to keep doing what they do best.  Perhaps, this gets back to my opening

theme at the top of this post: Who has time for reading ever-more weblogs?  When

do law students study?  When do lawyers practice law?  When do they have lives

away from their computers? 

 

There are many ways for those in search of new weblogs to find them.  Browsing

long and un-annotated blog rolls — created by bloggers who are promiscuous with 

their Link Love – seems like one of the least efficient ways to do so.   Taking a

look at the weekly Blawg Review is a pretty good place to start — but don’t feel

you have to “Read them all,” like Sean says.   You don’t have to catch every

fish in the sea.

 


 ”MGStuff”  Brevity is one of the best things about haiku.  Here to

show you how to do it right is composer-professor-poet Hilary Tann:

 



on his daily walks

my father’s steps

shorter now

 

 








hotel room -

trapped

in reflections

 

 

“MirrorG”

 

 



queene anne’s lace

   the tiny

       dark heart

 

 

 

 

 

first

snow

then

rain

then

snow

 

 







first date

she buys an extra

lottery ticket

 

 

 

above the embers

   fireflies

     and stars

 


 

                                                                                             iglooG

8 Comments

  1. Several good points. Thanks David.

    a comment is yet
    another way to tip
    for good service

    Comment by Kevin Heller — February 28, 2006 @ 12:46 pm

  2. Several good points. Thanks David.

    a comment is yet
    another way to tip
    for good service

    Comment by Kevin Heller — February 28, 2006 @ 12:46 pm

  3. Yes, a Comment can indeed be a tip, and I wish more folks could take the time to Comment, as you often do. Of course, a Comment can also be the tip an iceberg — or of a knife.

    Comment by David Giacalone — February 28, 2006 @ 12:57 pm

  4. Yes, a Comment can indeed be a tip, and I wish more folks could take the time to Comment, as you often do. Of course, a Comment can also be the tip an iceberg — or of a knife.

    Comment by David Giacalone — February 28, 2006 @ 12:57 pm

  5. Sadly, not timely in getting around to reading all of the things I should — the old “to do list” you mentioned being too long as it is.

    Your post, David, sharply criticizes something I posted that ran in Blawg Review #46. Yet, you flatly say in that entry you won’t take the time to comment on what aggravates you about my post; you discuss how beneficial comments can be to the overall discourse of a blog; but you didn’t voice your criticism of my entry in any comments on my blog. I wish you would have. After all, I just might have learned something from a former antitrust lawyer who spent a lot of time trying to get rid of the MFA.

    If you had submitted a comment, and given the opportunity for some dialogoue, you might have been pleasantly surprised to discover that I am not nearly as much of an idiot as you suggest.

    Comment by E L Eversman — March 23, 2006 @ 8:19 pm

  6. Sadly, not timely in getting around to reading all of the things I should — the old “to do list” you mentioned being too long as it is.

    Your post, David, sharply criticizes something I posted that ran in Blawg Review #46. Yet, you flatly say in that entry you won’t take the time to comment on what aggravates you about my post; you discuss how beneficial comments can be to the overall discourse of a blog; but you didn’t voice your criticism of my entry in any comments on my blog. I wish you would have. After all, I just might have learned something from a former antitrust lawyer who spent a lot of time trying to get rid of the MFA.

    If you had submitted a comment, and given the opportunity for some dialogoue, you might have been pleasantly surprised to discover that I am not nearly as much of an idiot as you suggest.

    Comment by E L Eversman — March 23, 2006 @ 8:19 pm

  7. Of course, if typos count, then you’re right, I am.

    Comment by E L Eversman — March 23, 2006 @ 8:21 pm

  8. Of course, if typos count, then you’re right, I am.

    Comment by E L Eversman — March 23, 2006 @ 8:21 pm

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