Entries Tagged as 'Conservation'

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

Creepy-crawlies and their tell-tale traces

Unsurprisingly, some of the centuries-old books now in Houghton’s library stacks have fared better over time than others.  There are many factors that impact the breakdown of codex materials, including (but not limited to) natural elements like water, heat, and either too much, or too little, humidity.  All of these deteriorate the components of the […]

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

Mark(er)s in Books

A recent acquisition from Leo Cadogan Rare Books of London continues a Houghton Library tradition that was articulated by Roger Stoddard’s Marks in Books Illustrated and Explained and published by the Library in 1985. Stoddard’s exhibition catalogue demonstrates the value of evidentiary traces of use that can survive in books and tell us about their […]

Monday, September 19th, 2011

Handle With Care

We are pleased to announce the availability of a new video tutorial, Handling Harvard’s Special Collections, which demonstrates basic handling procedures for bound, unbound, and oversized collection materials. The video is a collaboration between Houghton Library, the Weissman Preservation Center, and HCL Communications. It is intended for use university wide and is a wonderful resource […]

Friday, October 8th, 2010

After the Flood

See HCL News for the full story on the discoveries made by paper conservator Christopher Sokolowski in the course of treating a number of items damaged in a water leak in 2008. Perhaps the most interesting of these relates to a collection of drawings from an early-17th century French ballet. Under x-ray fluorescence analysis, Sokolowski […]

Monday, June 7th, 2010

Hours of labor

[Thanks to Lake Conservator Mary Oey for contributing this post.] This is a first edition copy of Lord Byron’s Hours of Idleness, owned by Byron’s friend John Cam Hobhouse. Hobhouse bought the book and had it rebound with alternating blank interleaves, which he energetically filled with editorializing remarks and other — often snarky — comments […]