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The Drug Bug

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection.

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The Drug Bug was an idea born through Allan Palmquist’s work with millions of Pennsylvanian high school students in 1970.  At the time Palmquist was the Promotional Director at the Teen Challenge Training Center in Rehrersburg, Pennsylvania.  Teen Challenge is a Christian organization that helps teens particularly those dealing with addiction.

The book was written with Frank M. Reynolds, an ordained minister and Executive Director of the Teen Challenge Training Center who worked closely with David Wilkerson who started Teen Challenge.  Wilkerson wrote the foreword for The Drug Bug and his name may be familiar for we featured him in a previous post entitled The Best Selling Preacher.

cov1_0008  The book details various groups that are curious about drugs or experimenting with them already and gives brief sketches of presumably true stories.  There are short Question and Answer sections which come from graduates of the Teen Challenge program.  It reads a bit like promotional material for this Christian organization, which is still in operation today.

To get a glimpse of society’s reaction in the early days of widespread youth drug addiction you can find The drug bug / by Al Palmquist and Frank Reynolds ; foreword by David Wilkerson. Minneapolis : Dimension Books, 1970. HV5824.Y68 P34 1970 in Widener’s collection.

 

Thanks to Alison Harris, Santo Domingo Project Manager, for contributing this post.

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection.

DMTPeople have always been fascinated with the idea of a soul.  One researcher, Rick Strassman, took this interest to the extreme and performed government approved research using the psychedelic drug N,N-dimethyltryptamine, or DMT, also known as the spirit molecule.  A short acting and highly powerful hallucinogenic drug, DMT is both synthesizable from the plant ayahuasca as well as being naturally occurring in the pineal gland of mammals.  The study follows 60 human volunteers taking this drug and the book DMT: The Spirit Molecule details their personal experiences during the experiment.  Strassman undertook this study due to his interest in the pineal gland as a potential biological locus for spiritual experiences.  Although the study was ended in 1995, Strassman believes it was very successful and gathered a wealth of biological and psychological information from it.  Rick Strassman is a currently practicing psychiatrist in New Mexico.  In 2014 he published a second book on the topic, DMT and the soul of prophecy: a new science of spiritual revelation in the Hebrew Bible.DMT

Interest in his study was strong and in 2010 a documentary with the same title, DMT: The Spirit Molecule, came out.  The movie follows the same experiment as the book and interviews many experts, including Strassman, on the topic of the powerful psychedelic drug DMT and its potential for unlocking human spirituality.  For further information on this topic, there are also many books on the plant ayahuasca, taken by native people in the Amazon, in the Santo Domingo Collection.

DMT: The Spirit Molecule is available at Widener Library in the Santo Domingo Collection.  DMT and the soul of prophecy: a new science of spiritual revelation in the Hebrew Bible is also available at Harvard in the Andover Theological Library.

Thanks to Emma Clement, Santo Domingo Library Assistant, for contributing this post.

Morbid beauty

Morgues 4This post is part of an ongoing series featuring material from the Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection. 

Of the many altered states of consciousness chronicled in the Santo Domingo Collection, death may be merely the most permanent; as a subject often circumnavigated out of discomfort, fear, superstition, or propriety, it takes its place alongside sexuality and drug use. This striking volume, Morgues, confronts death directly, though not without a sense of beauty.

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Road Trip in the 2 CV!

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection.

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Introduced by Citroën at a Paris motor show in 1948 the 2 CV remained in production up until 1990.  Originally designed with practicality in mind the initial goal of the 2 CV was to carry a dozen eggs over a bumpy field without cracking any of the eggs.  Similar in appearance to the VW Beetle the 2 CV projects a sort of whimsical charm.

There were a number of 2 CV drivers that journeyed across the world including Henri Lochon and Jacques Cornet.  In 1953 they set out to conquer the Americas and Africa.  En 2 CV : chez les primitifs : Indiens Tarahumaras de la Sierra Mexicaine chronicles Lochon’s time among the Tarahumaras in Mexico.  Interestingly Cornet ended up having to return to France before they reached their first base camp so Lochon carried on with his friend Eric Waubert for this particular leg.  The book describes the adventures and challenges in the 2 CV as well as observations about the Tarahumaras, who were the indigenous peoples.  cov1_0014Though I’m not sure it is an “exceptional psychological document” as the jacket proclaims it does contain information about the social customs and ceremonies of the Tarahumaras.  Clearly Lochon was interested in their culture and shares information about their beliefs throughout the trip. For example he notes that according to tradition the females choose their own husbands.

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cov1_0010En 2 CV : chez les primitifs : Indiens Tarahumaras de la Sierra Mexicaine / Henri Lochon. Lyon : E. Vinay c1956. F1221.T25L63 1956 can be found in Widener’s collection.

Thanks to Alison Harris, Santo Domingo Project Manager, for contributing this post.

Nourishing Words

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection.

Whole GrainsWhole Grains is a book edited by Art Spiegelman and Bob Schneider that is composed entirely of quotes.  Even the introduction is just another collection of quotes without any explanatory prose.  The book is made up of four sections, “Sex, Dope and Cheap Thrills,” “Earth Ship,” “Alienation Blues,” and “White Light” and the quotes come from every place imaginable.  One page in the “Earth Ship” section has a quote from each Steve McQueen, Walt Whitman, Ronald Regan, the Whole Earth Catalog and a sign in a park in Barcelona.  Although the book does include quotes from both Spiegelman and Schneider, for the most part, it is other people’s words curated by them.Whole Grains

Art Spiegelman was deeply involved in the underground comix movement and worked with famous cartoonists such as Robert Crumb and Bill Griffith.  He published many works including the comic anthology Raw.  He also wrote comics for The New Yorker in the late 90s and early 2000s. Both of his parents were Holocaust survivors and several of his works deal with this.  His most critically acclaimed piece is Mous which deals with the Holocaust and his family history.  Whole Grains is dedicated to his mother after her suicide.  Bob Schneider is also a comic author and screenwriter who currently writes for McSweeny’s.

Whole Grains: A Book of Quotations is in the Santo Doming Collection available at Widener Library.  Other books by Spiegelman such as Co-mix: a retrospective of comics, graphics, and scraps and Maus : a survivor’s tale are available in Harvard’s collections.

Thanks to Emma Clement, Santo Domingo Library Assistant, for contributing this post.

Tableaux

While cataloging American Civil War broadsides, I found this playbill advertising Wesley’s War Tableaux, to be presented in Cambridge, Massachusetts at the Lyceum Hall from February 23-25 [1863]. Moving panoramas were large painted scenes on rolls of canvas, framed by a proscenium to hide the mechanism; they were unwound from one roll to another, to create the illusion of movement and the progression of time, and were often accompanied by music.  They became popular public spectacles in the early to mid- 19th century, with touring productions traveling around Europe and America; toy moving panoramas were produced for the home. Subjects included exotic locales, historical events and elaborate rural and urban scenes, such as Henry Lewis’ remarkable Mississippi River panorama. Dioramas included additional figures for a more three-dimensional effect.

The diorama for this spectacle was designed by Truman C. Bartholomew and Preston Wesley. Bartholomew was a scenic artist of note in Boston; in addition to providing scenery for Boston theatres, he produced a Bunker Hill panorama in 1838, and other moving panoramas between 1848 and 1863, depicting such scenes as the Battle of Lexington, a tour of Scotland, and the Kennebec River.  In 1857, with a partner, Chase, he created a three-dimensional “mechanical mirror” of naval battles of the War of 1812, “with 7,000 moving figures in six separate scenes.” [1]

This production, also known as Wesley’s Grand War Picture, has been enhanced with a new attraction:  “Dioramic view of the Merrimac, Monitor and Cumberland … the Merrimac is seen to approach upon her work of destruction in moving water, and the Cumberland actually sinks beneath the waves, before the eyes of the audience.” Other tableaux featured Army battles, the Baltimore Riot featuring the “Bloody Sixth” of Massachusetts, the attack on Fort Sumter; and also “The Negro Regiment at Hilton Head and other scenes in regular order up to the present time,” probably the company of former slaves that became the First South Carolina Volunteers.

The playbill proclaims: “Land and naval engagements are portrayed with a vividness mocking reality. The roar of artillery, the clash of musketry are heard! The advancing armies and their desperate contests are seen, and the fearful work of blood is presented with terrible distinctness!”  This sensationalism probably elicited a strong reaction in the spectator; local regiments were still engaged, and the terrible battles of Antietam and Fredericksburg were only months past.  For more background on panoramas, dioramas and cycloramas, see the Harvard Fine Arts Library’s copy of  Illusions in motion: media archaeology of the moving panorama and related spectacles by Erkki Huhtamo (Cambridge:  MIT Press, 2013).

[1] Arrington, Joseph Earl. “Lewis and Bartholomew’s Mechanical Panorama of the Battle of Bunker Hill.” Old-Time New England  (Fall 1961, vol. 52, no. 186): 50-58. Web. 4 March 2015.

Portland [Maine] : J. S. Staples, printer, [1863?]. US 102.8.5 (27).

Thanks to cataloging assistant Dana Gee for contributing this post.

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection.

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Whether you think of sideshow banners as art or advertisement there is no denying their “wow” factor.  Freaks, geeks & strange girls : sideshow banners of the Great American Midway is an anthology of perspectives on the history of the sideshow including its social aspects with accompanying sideshow banner art.  cov1_0001Many might argue that perhaps it isn’t the most positive side of humanity that we did (and still do) pay money to see representations of the grotesque or as society would put it bluntly- freaks.  You might be tempted to think that people in a sideshow were exploited and abused and certainly some probably were, but you can also look at it as a time that the marginalized were able to embrace themselves and become self-sufficient when many were locked away from the world.

What if you were born with no arms and still wanted to be able to earn a living during this time?  Let’s look at the example of Martha The Armless Wonder.  cov1_0004Martha Morris was a featured attraction at Coney Island, as well as the traveling Freak City Show of the 1920s.  She would write with her feet and type with her toes to demonstrate her amazing dexterity.  She was also in the 1932 film Freaks which was highly controversial and a financial failure.  Some critics believed it exploited the people featured in the film who were real stars of sideshows but did it exploit Martha?  According to her family Martha loved the movies and was presumably proud to be in a film.  It does raise an interesting question about where is the line between exploitation and empowerment?  To learn more about the people that worked in sideshows you might be interested in American sideshow : an encyclopedia of history’s most wondrous and curiously strange performers by Marc Hartzman. 

Freaks, geeks & strange girls : sideshow banners of the Great American Midway. Randy Johnson, Jim Secreto, Teddy Varndell ; contributions from Glen C. Davies [and others].  Honolulu, Hawaii : Hardy Marks Publications, ©1995 can be found in Widener Library.

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Thanks to Alison Harris, Santo Domingo Project Manager, for contributing this post.

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection.

1960sThe 1960s is one of the most iconic decades in American history.  Instantly recognizable fashion, civil rights protests and legislation, Pop art, and the space race are all hallmarks of this decade that people aren’t quick to forget.  The Hulton Getty Picture Collection 1960s, is a compilation of some of the most memorable moments in the 1960s in striking black and white photographs.  The book includes sections entitled movers and shakers, Conflict, Protest, Entertainment, The Arts, Pop, Fashion, Youth, The space age, Sport, Children, Guilt and grief, All human life.  These photographs capture the joy of the 1960s as well as the sorrow; pictures of the most recognizable faces in fashion, art, and music are included as well as pictures of natural disasters, murderers and protests.  Each section is preceded by a brief description of the themes of the pictures and notable moments are described.  One of the most unique aspects of this book is the text is presented in English, German and French.1960s

The Hulton Getty Picture Collection is one of the best collections of photography and photojournalism.  It includes photographs from the 19th and 20th century, often with a focus on socially significant topics and images.  This book on the 1960s is no exception, a truly international collection ranging from armed conflict in Asia and Africa to British and American movie stars, the Hulton Getty collection documents a wide variety of topics but focuses on iconic and dramatic images that tug at the emotions and mind.  The Hulton Getty is a collection comprised of the former Hulton Press Library, a British photo agency, Keystone View Company, formerly located in Pennsylvania, and other notable photographers.  The Hulton Getty Collection has since grown to include other collections and is now the Hulton Archive.

The book, The Hulton Getty Picture Collection 1960sis available in the Santo Doming Collection at Widener Library.  Readers interested in more Hulton Getty images can check out The Irish century and An independent eye: a century of photographs both also available at Widener.

Thanks to Emma Clement, Santo Domingo Library Assistant, for contributing this post.

Magical Plants

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection.

MandrakeThe mandrake root is often referenced in mythical texts and stories, with many powerful magical powers ascribed to it.  The root can resemble human limbs and rumor is that when it is pulled from the ground it lets out a blood curdling scream that can kill anyone who hears it.  In the introduction, Leslie Shepard tells the myth of how to remove the root. Mandrake

“You had to stop your ears with wax, expose enough of the plant to tie it to a dog, then incite the animal to pull the mandrake, the dog dying in the process.  After that the plant was safe to handle and had various magical properties.”  The root was clearly thought to be a very powerful magical object if people were willing to risk death to obtain it!  Although the plant does have mildly medical qualities, in ancient Rome it was used as an anesthetic and was later used to treat rheumatism, it is in fact a very dangerous plant as the berries contain a very potent poison.Mandrake

This book, The Mystic Mandrake, follows the history of the plant for 3,000 years, from ancient civilizations to current times both looking at the medical and scientific aspects of the plants as well as addressing the magic and superstition that surrounds the root.  Long considered an aphrodisiac, many herbalists discuss the different male and female incarnations of the plant.  Written by C.J.S. Thompson, the curator of the museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, this book is well researched and thorough.  Thompson looks at different literary references, including Shakespeares’ Antony and Cleopatra, as well as historical documents and objects to weave his story about the magical plant.  MandrakeThompson wrote extensively on plants and poisons, as well as the links between the medical world and the magical.  Several other of Thompson’s books can be found at Harvard including The Quacks of Old London, Magic and healing, and Poisons and poisoners, with historical accounts of some famous mysteries in ancient and modern timesThe Mystic Mandrake is part of the Santo Doming Collection and can be viewed at Widener Library.

 

 

Thanks to Emma Clement, Santo Domingo Library Assistant, for contributing this post.

Youth quake!

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection.

IMG_0052  What’s the younger generation coming to? 
This is a question that parents have been asking probably since the dawn of time.  However it is especially interesting when looked at through the lens of the 1960s.  The 60’s was such a time of discovery, change, and upheaval that the emergence of a strong voice for young people was almost a foregone conclusion.  Reporters and photographers of United Press International and Cowles turned to kids in high school, college, and other popular hangouts in order to tune into this new voice in the volume Youth quake.  Young people were asked about music, religion, sex, civil rights, politicians, money, books, and drinking to name just a few of the covered topics.  Then they wrote a series of articles to report the findings of these conversations.
The book covers what you might expect detailing drug trips and the sex revolution, but it also focuses in on serious minded youths that were committed to making a better life for themselves as well as the world.  One of the articles points out that the Peace Corps, which was established in the 1960s, is one of the greatest achievements of this “serious minded youth.”  IMG_0056  Another interesting section is a series of articles that fall under Conversations Parent’s Never Hear… These range from topics such as communication or lack thereof between father and son and one story of being a conscientious objector to the Vietnam war.  However the book doesn’t take itself too seriously and details the fashion, activities, and popular trends of the day entitled The Out and the In.

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To learn more about the opinions of young people in the 1960s take a look at Youth quake. [New York], [Cowles Education Corp.], [1968] HQ796.Y6 1968 which can be found in Widener’s collection.

Thanks to Alison Harris, Santo Domingo Project Manager, for contributing this post.

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection.

Goofballs and Pep PillsAt first glance Let’s talk about Goofballs and Pep Pills seems like a funny comic book akin with much of the satirical pamphlets in the Santo Domingo Collection.  However, despite the pen and ink cartoons illustrating this book, it is actually a booklet about the dangers of certain prescription drugs and LSD.  It is a rather bizarre mix of very simple explanations such as, “Nausea (sick to stomach)” or “Delirium, hallucinations (imagining things – pink elephants, etc.)” and excerpts from serious medical studies on the drugs.  Although there are many consequences of drug abuse listed in this book, the end section focuses exclusively on the dangers of driving while using these prescription or illegal drugs.  It seems as though this book is geared to the casual addict or young people who do not realize that abusing prescription pills is a possibility.  The addition of LSD in this collection is surprising based on the way the drugs are described and the intended audience, but Curtis does explain that LSD does have some legitimate medical uses.Goofballs and Pep Pills

Goofballs and Pep PillsLindsay R. Curtis was an OB-GYN based in Utah and wrote extensively both on reproductive topics as well as texts about substance abuse.  He authored a newspaper column titled “For Women Only” and the list of books in his biography at the end of Goofballs and Pep Pills includes titles such as Smoking OR Health? And Glue-Sniffing: Big Trouble in a Tube. His most famous book is titled Pregnant and Lovin’ it.  Many of his books are also illustrated with cartoons and are aimed at the lay reader.

Goofballs and Pep PillsPregnant and lovin’ it / by Lindsay R. Curtis and Yvonne Coroles; illustrated by Paul Farber is available in Schlesinger’s collection.  My body, my decision! : what you should know about the most common female surgeries / Lindsay R. Curtis, Glade B. Curtis, Mary K. Beard ; illustrations by Paul Farber and Let’s talk about drugs / by Lindsay R. Curtis are also available at Harvard Libraries.  LinkLet’s talk about goofballs and pep pills, including tranquilizers and LSD, by Lindsay R. Curtis. Illustrated by Dean Hurst, part of the Santo Doming Collection, is available at Widener Library.

 

 

 

Thanks to Emma Clement, Santo Domingo Library Assistant, for contributing this post.

Feel a librarian today

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection.

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Before Jon Stewart or Stephen Colbert there was a man named Alan Abel.  Actor, writer, filmmaker, comedian, jazz musician and professional prankster these are all the many faces of Abel.  For the past half-century Abel has been pranking the media and the world and it all began in 1951 with S.I.N.A.  The Society for Indecency to Naked Animals had an important mission- to clothe all animals for the sake of modesty.  SINA-1It began as a tounge-in-cheek commentary on censorship in America, but the media went crazy for S.I.N.A. which many took seriously and this is when Abel realized that with little evidence and a straight face he could convince people of this absurd idea.

Thus began a long career of creating hoaxes some small and many much more elaborate.  There was the time that Abel faked his own death and had his obituary published in the New York Times.  The story that was published said that he had a heart attack while skiing in Utah scouting locations for a movie called Who’s Going to Bite Your Neck, Dear, When All of My Teeth are Gone?  Another hoax involved Jenny McCarthy who in 1997 had a controversial ad for Candies featuring her sitting on a toilet.  JENNYMCCARTHY-1

Soon after Stoidi Puekaw decided to market “Jenny’s Pint O’Pee” claiming there were 500,000 cases of her urine ready to be shipped from Mexico.  Her lawyers quickly claimed trademark infringement and when Abel revealed the joke he pointed out his pseudonym read backwards spelled Wake Up Idiots!

 The Button Book was a joint project between Abel and his wife Jeanne with the illustrations by Cynthia Lansing York.  IMG_0003The pages display potential buttons that the reader is encouraged to enjoy on the page or even cut out of the book to wear as real buttons.  As the Abel’s point out they are also extremely useful to conceal a hole in a sweater or perhaps use as a monocle.  The pages of buttons seem to veer between political commentary, satire, puns, and double entendres.

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The button book by Alan and Jeanne Abel. Illus. by Cynthia Lansing York. New York, Citadel Press [1967]. PN6162.A22 1967 can be found in Widener’s collection.

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Thanks to Alison Harris, Santo Domingo Project Manager, for contributing this post.

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection.

The private life of sherlock holmesAlthough fan fiction is cropping up everywhere now and seems to be a new fad, it has actually been around for quite some time.  Fictitious characters have often inspired imaginative readers who go on to write their own stories.  Sherlock Holmes is no exception, though the extent of the genre and the seriousness with which people pursue it might be unusual.   Much of the stories about Sherlock Holmes are written as though he was a real person, and there are even “historical” sites devoted to him.  One such author is Vincent Starrett, a Holmes enthusiast who wrote The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes in 1933.  Written as a biography, it takes into account both the fictional character of Holmes and describes further exploits and adventures, while also discussing Arthur Conan Doyle and the writing and publishing of these stories.

Subcutaneously my dear watsonAnother way in which authors have interacted with fictional characters is to examine the full cannon of stories about them and analyze character traits or actions.  One example is Subcutaneously, My Dear Watson: Sherlock Holmes and the cocaine habit by Jack Tracy.  Inspired by the pastiche The Seven-Per-Cent Solution by Nicholas Meyer, Tracy studies the use of cocaine in the Sherlock Holmes tales and describes how it impacts the detective and his relationships.  It is an interesting read for Holmes enthusiasts as well as those interested in late 19th century attitude toward cocaine and drug use.

The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes by Vincent Starrett and Subcutaneously My Dear Watson by Jack Tracy are from the Santo Domingo Collection. Several other books about Sherlock Holmes both by Arthur Conan Doyle and others can be found in Harvard’s collections.  Some examples include, The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes by Adrian Conan Doyle, Arthur’s son, and Sherlock Holmes: the unauthorized biography by Nick Rennison.

Thanks to Emma Clement, Santo Domingo Library Assistant, for contributing this post.

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection.

cat  Massachusetts is known for many things- ridiculously high taxes, fanatical sports teams, and this year “historic” winter storms.  What I was unaware of until now were the seemingly crazy laws that exist in our history until I started flipping the pages of this book.  Why would one limit the height of a dog to 10 inches and that of a cat to 48 inches?  The idea for Comics in the Law came from the popularity of the radio broadcasts of “Freak Laws” by Lyman Cook on the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) and Station KMOX in Saint Louis, Missouri during the 1930s.  Cook was a member of the Missouri Bar and the book is a compilation of these bizarre laws often accompanied by hilarious illustrations.  Here are a few gems I noticed that refer to our great state of Massachusetts.

santaWhat’s wrong with Christmas?  When the Puritans came over to America they also brought their dislike of festivity with them and commemorated Christmas by praying, reflecting on sin, and working instead of resting.  In 1659 the Massachusetts Bay Colony even went so far as to charge a five shilling fee for anyone caught celebrating.  This law lasted a long 23 years but it took almost another two hundred before the state declared Christmas to be an official holiday in 1856.  It can best be summed up by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow who wrote “We are in a transition state about Christmas here in New England. The old Puritan feeling prevents it from being a cheerful hearty holiday; though every year makes it more so.”

wife  Apparently a man cannot refuse to marry a woman simply because she has a bad disposition. This was upheld in a case tried in Suffolk County between Anna D. Van Houten vs. Asa P. Morse in 1894.  She claimed breach of promise of marriage against him and the jury returned a verdict supporting her.

If a man and a woman enter into an engagement to marry…or that there was a want of affection on her part, or an incompatibility, resulting from disparity of age, difference in character and dispositions, and other causes, will not justify him, as matter of law, in breaking the contract.

To learn more about bizarre laws across the country look for Comics in the law, by Lyman E. Cook … [Chicago,Universal publishers, c1938] which can be found in Widener’s collection.

Thanks to Alison Harris, Santo Domingo Project Manager, for contributing this post.

Hallucinex 1This post is part of an ongoing series featuring material from the Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection. 

Today’s featured item from the Santo Domingo Collection is L’internationale hallucinex (Le Soleil Noir: 1970), a collection of writings by French, American, and English countercultural authors in the form of a series of pamphlets. The collection announces its subversive intent on its case: “Revue – tract à détruire” is printed next to a collage of a knife stabbing an eye. Contained within are texts and images by William S. Burroughs, Claude Pélieu, Jeff Nuttal, Ed Sanders, and others. Distinguishing this copy is an original screen printing of a comic strip by illustrator José Sánchez, rolled and housed in a second compartment of the volume’s slipcase. The print is numbered 13/100, suggesting that one hundred copies of L’internationale hallucinex were thus issued.

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L’internationale hallucinex: HN18.I6 1970a; HOLLIS number 5401109

Thanks to rare book cataloger Ryan Wheeler for contributing this post.

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection.

Symbolists and DecadentsMany volumes in the Santo Domingo Collection are about fine art, some exploring the limits of social acceptability whereas others recount more commonly seen art.  Symbolists and Decadents by John Christian gives an interesting and thorough examination of the art movement of symbolism.  In the introduction Christian explains symbolism in art, stating “The term symbolist and decadent art is virtually impossible to define, so different in temperament, scope and achievement were the artists concerned.  The only real common denominator was an approach to subject matter, a belief that a picture is neither simply an arrangement of lines and colours, nor a transcript from nature, but that behind a picture lies another order of meaning.”  With this definition in mind, he explores several famous artists ranging from Odilon Redon to Paul Gauguin to Pablo Picasso.

Orpheus by Odilon Redon

Orpheus by Odilon Redon

The Mill by Edward Burne-Jones

The Mill by Edward Burne-Jones

Each painting is accompanied by a short paragraph of description and explanation about the artist and why the piece has been included in this collection.  Christian does not limit himself to one physical collection but references paintings held in a variety of museums and galleries.  The explanations are short and easy to read, there is no need to be an art historian yourself to enjoy this book.  The extensive introduction places the movement in historical context while highlighting some of the more famous artists involved.  Symbolists and Decadents is available in Widener Library’s collection.

For those interested, John Christian is also a renowned Edward Burne-Jones scholar and his book on the artist, Edward Burne-Jones : the hidden humorist, is available at the Fine Arts Library.

Thanks to Emma Clement, Santo Domingo Library Assistant, for contributing this post.

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection.

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Poltroon Press put out the volume Pshaw! 1975-2005 : 30 Years of Poltroonery to “celebrate thirty years of existence.”  Poltroon is a small press from Berkely, California that is still printing today.  The volume includes some of their most memorable ephemera reproductions along with brief explanations of their history and usage.  Here are a few of my favorites.  KIC_Image_0003

The Canine Wine label was born on a night when one of the authors was drinking terrible wine with their friend Nancy who exclaimed “This wine is not fit for dogs!”  Thus the concept of Wine for Dogs was born and they printed up a few wine labels including the Weimaraner Rhine Whine pictured.

Mädchen in Uniform was printed by the press in 1976 with 50 original copies.  It features a poem by Bernard de Ventadorn and a paper doll of a woman with various military outfits, including a pink purse.  Bernard was a master troubadour from the Middle Ages, his poem is reproduced with a translation which reads,

she’ll do badly if sheKIC_Image_0007
dont summon me to
where she undresses,
there at her command
near the bed, or at the
edge, I may remove
her well-fitted shoes,
on my knees & hum-
bled, if it shld please
her to offer me a foot.

 

 

 

 

There is also a beautiful visual representation of Miss Flite’s birds from Charles Dickens’ Bleak House.  For those unfamiliar with the tale Miss Flite kept a collection of caged birds which she planned to release when a judgement from the Jarndyce and Jarndyce lawsuit was reached.  One of the many ironies is that the lawsuit goes on for so long the birds keep dying and need to be replaced.  It is a common interpretation that the caged birds represent the people who have been trapped by the lawsuit and their names represent the many ideas and ideals associated with it like Joy, Hope, Madness, Cunning, Folly, and Ashes.

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To explore more of the amazing reproductions of the original ephemera and learn about the Poltroon Press you can find this volume in Houghton Library.

Pshaw : Poltroon Press, 1975-2005. [Berkeley, Calif. :Poltroon Press,2006]. Z232.P795P74 2006.

Thanks to Alison Harris, Santo Domingo Project Manager and Ryan Wheeler, Rare Book Cataloger, for contributing this post.

Eupantophone 1This post is part of an ongoing series featuring material from the Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection. 

Henri Austruy, born in 1871, was an attorney and editor of the journal La nouvelle revue from 1913 to 1940, when occupying Nazi forces shut the journal down. 1940 is also the approximate date of Austruy’s unrecorded death, which may have been at the hands of the same forces. During his editorship, Austruy also produced several idiosyncratic works of turn-of-the-century science fiction and fantasy, which used alternate histories and imagined futures to lampoon and allegorize contemporary society. These novels, underappreciated in their time and nearly unknown today, include L’ère “Petitpaon”, ou, La paix universelle (1906). In it, Austruy satirizes his bellicose civilization by describing a near-future world utterly at peace; less than a decade after its publication, Europe would be engulfed in war.

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Skills for Kids

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection.

DiscoverAlthough most of the items in the Santo Domingo Collection are geared towards adults there are some great exceptions.  Discover Skills for Life is a teaching tool for elementary schools that addresses wide ranging topics from building self-esteem to decision making and relationship skills.   Also included is a chapter on becoming informed about drugs in which the authors explain different types of drugs in order to differentiate medicine from illegal drugs as well as describing tobacco and alcohol.  One section in this chapter is about challenging the myths about alcohol.

DiscoverThe first myth is the idea that only hard liquor is harmful, the second is that only large amounts of alcohol can hurt people.  This one is answered specifically for children since they cannot handle as much alcohol as an adult can.  The final myth is that alcohol is the best way to have fun.  The handbook explains that this is not true and that there are many other ways to have fun such as skateboarding, reading, hiking, fishing and visiting a relative.

DiscoverThere are also discussion questions at the end of each page.  Some of them are more casual such as “what favorite ways of having fun do you have?” whereas others are more pointed and specific like “why do many cocaine abusers quickly become dependent on the drug?”  The first and last chapters of the book are much more lighthearted, addressing communication, giving up worries, and positive self-talk.  Although the book is clearly geared towards children and doesn’t provide a lot of specific information, it is interesting to see how these difficult subjects are address when elementary students are the primary target.

This book, Discover Skills for Life is available in the Santo Domingo Collection at Widener Library.

Thanks to Emma Clement, Santo Domingo Library Assistant, for contributing this post.

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection.

from the belly of the whale

One of the many pleasures of working with this collection is the amazing graphic nature of the cover art on books, newspapers, and magazines that we encounter on a daily basis.  After seeing the success of Scanning Key Content, a Harvard Library Lab project that aims to scan selected content at the point of cataloging, we decided to implement a pilot project for JMSD materials being cataloged for Widener.

 

 

black candle canada's first book on drug abuse

reconstruction in china

Scanning of covers will aid in the discovery of the materials in our catalog particularly for items that have multiple publications, editions, or other variant printings.  There is also a strong potential for research value since the cover can reflect popular sentiments of the time, topics, or even a relationship between the author and creator of the cover art.

We are especially interested in providing better access to serial publications which can often be difficult or confusing to locate in the catalog.

petit parisien  tiger beat

We are happy to report that we successfully cataloged and scanned about 500 items from Widener’s collection of JMSD materials.  The image links are available to view in the cataloged records for both Hollis Classic and Hollis+.  In Hollis Classic the links are located on the same page as the bibliographic record.  In Hollis+ you can view images in either the View Online tab or if you are in the Details tab go to the links on the right hand side of the page (near the image of the bookplate).

drugs and the other self

This would not have been possible without the very generous assistance and support of our colleagues involved in the Scanning Key Content project: Karen Nipps, Debbie Funkhouser, Amy Benson, Nell Carlson, and Corinna Baksik.  Thanks to everyone and we will keep scanning!

From the belly of the whale / by Clinton White. Plainfield, N.J. : Logos International, 1972, ©1970. 

The black candle / by Emily F. Murphy “Janey Canuck.” Introd. by Brian Anthony & Robert Solomon. Toronto, T. Allen [1973].

Reconstruction in China ; a record of progress and achievement in facts and figures … Shanghai, China united press, 1935. 

Le Petit parisien. Paris [France] : Verdien, 1876-1944.

Lloyd Thaxton’s tiger beatHollywood, Calif. : New Asbury, [1966-]. 

Drugs and the other self : an anthology of spiritual transformations. Edited, with an introduction, by Chaman Nahal. New York : Harper & Row 1971. 

Thanks to Alison Harris, Santo Domingo Project Manager, for contributing this post.

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