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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection. Alexandre Lacassagne was a French physician and criminologist in the 19th-century.  He founded the Lacassagne School of Criminology which was based in Lyon, France and focused on medical jurisprudence and criminal anthropology.  He quite famously gave [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo collection. Herbarium for pharmaceutical students was produced by Alban Edward Lomax, a 19th-century pharmacist that hailed from Liverpool, England.  An herbarium is essentially a collection of preserved plant specimens typically arranged by a specific nomenclature and classification.  [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. This 1882 volume of Poe’s poetry and essays, accompanied by biographical information and commentary on the poems, is a fine example of the publishers’ cloth bindings of its period. In response to broadening literacy and therefore increasing demand, [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the Julio Mario Santo Domingo collection. Today’s feature is Etidorhpa, or The end of the earth, a fantastical novel by pharmacologist John Uri Lloyd, written in the hollow-earth mold of Jules Verne’s Journey to the center of the earth. The title is, as observant [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. This recently-cataloged volume from the Santo Domingo Collection appears to be an unexceptional 1932 printing of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland: the book’s illustrated covers have faded, and its acidic paper stock has gone from white to tan. [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection.   The use of electricity in medical treatment is hardly a new concept, Guillaume Duchenne was a French neurologist and developer of electrotherapy.  Duchenne announced in 1855 that alternating current was more effective than a direct current for [...]

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Virtually Dickinson

We are very pleased to announce the launch of the Emily Dickinson Archive, http://edickinson.org, an open-access site that brings together nearly all of Emily Dickinson’s extant poetry manuscripts. A collaborative effort across many institutions, the resource provides readers with images of manuscripts held in multiple libraries and archives, and also offers an array of transcriptions [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. Description of the Retreat, an institution near York, for insane persons of the Society of Friends is a volume by Samuel Tuke who was a Quaker and mental-health reformer in early 19th-century England.  Tuke believed in this new [...]

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This past spring, Houghton Library collaborated with the Emily Dickinson Museum in Amherst and the North Bennet Street School in Boston to create exact reproductions of the writing desk and bureau originally in Emily Dickinson’s bedroom in the Homestead. Since 1950, the two iconic pieces have been part of the Emily Dickinson Collection at the [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. Voyage dans la lune avant 1900 is an extraordinary French children’s book that is composed primarily of color lithographs by Herold & Cie., which are based on the original designs of A. de Ville d’Avray’s.  Almost nothing about [...]

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In her formative years, the American poet Emily Dickinson’s interests centered on the study of voice and especially piano, for which she displayed considerable accomplishment and ambition. Her correspondence supplies the background for these activities while the contents of her music book provides a revealing perspective on just how assiduously and enthusiastically she collected, listened [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. Today from the Santo Domingo Collection, a curiosity: Scènes d’alcoolisme, a series of transparencies printed on glassine paper and published by Libraire Larousse, depicting the ravages of alcoholism. Included with the sheet of transparencies are a sheet of [...]

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[Thanks to Houghton patron Scott Guthery for contributing this guest post.] In putting together a story of mathematics in post-colonial America – in particular mathematics as found outside of colleges and universities – I found Google’s digitization of Harvard’s copy of Mathematical Tables by Solomon P. Miles and Thomas Sherman, the third stereotype edition of 1842 published [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. Searching for information about flowers, medicine, and the secret to great skin?  Look no further than this beautifully illustrated French volume Les fleurs et secretz de medecine. Until the late 19th-century the practice of bloodletting was regularly used [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. Could it be true that similar animal forms share the same habits?  José Joaquim da Gama Machado certainly thought so, and produced the text and drawings to back it up.  Machado was a 19th-century scientist who studied homeopathy, [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. Today’s volume, an 1860 edition of Baudelaire’s Les paradis artificiels: opium et haschisch, is handsomely appointed in navy morocco and marbled paper boards, with a matching suede-lined slipcase. It bears the bookplates of the French writer Maxime Du [...]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. Les fleurs animées is a beautiful lithographic collection in two volumes that was illustrated in the mid 19th-century by J.J. Grandville, whose real name was Jean Ignace Isidore Gérard.  The book imagines a world where the flowers are able [...]

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Song of the Bell(s)

While we don’t usually acquire multiple copies of the same book, we broke that rule with two recent accessions. Friedrich Schiller (1759-1805) published Das Lied von der Glocke (“The Song of the Bell”) in 1798.  It remains one of the most well-known German poems, and has been translated into many languages. In 1873, the Dryden [...]

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In the summer of 1869, Transcendentalist philosopher, essayist, and famed Concordian Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) was presented with a challenging task.  Harvard College assigned him to obtain donations from fellow members of the Class of 1821.  The College wished to raise a sum of $500,000, a substantial sum even today. Emerson did not rush to [...]

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Charles Armitage Brown (1787-1842) is perhaps best known for his friendship with the poet John Keats.  A skilled amateur artist, Brown is responsible for one of the most recognizable images of his friend. Houghton recently acquired a bound album of Brown’s drawings, produced between 1809 and 1811.  The ink drawings include sixty-four heads, studies Brown [...]

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