Feed on
Posts
Comments

Fuzz against Junk

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection. Most likely we have all heard the slang of the word “fuzz” to describe a police officer.  There appears to be little reliable information to back up the supposition that people indeed used the word during […]

Read Full Post »

La Danse Macabre

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the Julio Mario Santo Domingo collection. Eros, it should now be obvious, is intrinsic to the Santo Domingo Collection; it follows that Thanatos can’t be far behind. This lavish volume by Éditions Kra is entitled La Danse Macabre, and consists of twenty images by the […]

Read Full Post »

Nezval at night

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. Books in the Santo Domingo collection are predominantly in English and French, per the collecting habits of Julio Mario Santo Domingo himself. Today we have an exception to this rule: Sexuální nocturno, by the avant-garde Czech author Vítězslav […]

Read Full Post »

Song of the Bell(s)

While we don’t usually acquire multiple copies of the same book, we broke that rule with two recent accessions. Friedrich Schiller (1759-1805) published Das Lied von der Glocke (“The Song of the Bell”) in 1798.  It remains one of the most well-known German poems, and has been translated into many languages. In 1873, the Dryden […]

Read Full Post »

Charles Armitage Brown (1787-1842) is perhaps best known for his friendship with the poet John Keats.  A skilled amateur artist, Brown is responsible for one of the most recognizable images of his friend. Houghton recently acquired a bound album of Brown’s drawings, produced between 1809 and 1811.  The ink drawings include sixty-four heads, studies Brown […]

Read Full Post »

In 1785, Jean Jacques Audubon was born in Haiti, the illigitimate son of a French naval officer and his mistress.  Audubon immigrated to the United States at age 18 (anglicizing his name to John James Audubon), and almost immediately began to study its ornithology, hoping to illustrate the birds he observed in a more realistic […]

Read Full Post »

Wild flowers

In 1846, while living at Brook Farm (the Transcendentalist utopian experiment in communal living) in West Roxbury, Massachusetts, artist Marianne Dwight (later Orvis) compiled this album of watercolor flower portraits.  Dwight (1816-1901) made a living creating lampshades and paintings, and her detailed punchwork designs can be seen on the cover of the album (click the […]

Read Full Post »