Breaking the Net

Mark Lemley, David Post, and Dave Levine have an excellent article in the Stanford Law Review Online, Don’t Break the Internet. It explains why proposed legislation, such as SOPA and PROTECT IP, is so badly-designed and pernicious. It’s not quite clear what is happening with SOPA, but it appears to be scheduled for mark-up this week. SOPA has, ironically, generated some highly thoughtful writing and commentary – I recently read pieces by Marvin Ammori, Zach Carter, Rebecca MacKinnon / Ivan Sigal, and Rob Fischer.

There are two additional, disturbing developments. First, the public choice problems that Jessica Litman identifies with copyright legislation more generally are manifestly evident in SOPA: Rep. Lamar Smith, the SOPA sponsor, gets more campaign donations from the TV / movie / music industries than any other source. He’s not the only one. These bills are rent-seeking by politically powerful industries; those campaign donations are hardly altruistic. The 99% – the people who use the Internet – don’t get a seat at the bargaining table when these bills are drafted, negotiated, and pushed forward.

Second, representatives such as Mel Watt and Maxine Waters have not only admitted to ignorance about how the Internet works, but have been proud of that fact. They’ve been dismissive of technical experts such as Vint Cerf – he’s only the father of TCP/IP – and folks such as Steve King of Iowa can’t even be bothered to pay attention to debate over the bill. I don’t mind that our Congresspeople are not knowledgeable about every subject they must consider – there are simply too many – but I am both concerned and offended that legislators like Watt and Waters are proud of being fools. This is what breeds inattention to serious cybersecurity problems while lawmakers freak out over terrorists on Twitter. (If I could have one wish for Christmas, it would be that every terrorist would use Twitter. The number of Navy SEALs following them would be… sizeable.) It is worrisome when our lawmakers not only don’t know how their proposals will affect the most important communications platform in human history, but overtly don’t care. Ignorance is not bliss, it is embarrassment.

Cross-posted at Prawfsblawg.

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