Mod a Game Console, Go to Jail

I’ve been puzzling over the 6th Circuit’s new opinion in United States v. Reichert (No. 13-3479, Mar. 28, 2014), in which a divided panel affirmed a defendant’s criminal conviction for violating the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s anti-trafficking rule (17 U.S.C. § 1201(a)(2)) based on the defendant’s sale of a “modded” video game console to an […]

Formalism and Slow Victories in “Saving the Neighborhood”

We’re fewer than 24 hours away from seeing Carol Rose and Richard Brooks at a conference at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, titled “Saving the Neighborhood,” after their new book. (Spaces still available! Register here.) I posted about the information law aspects of racial covenants here (cross-posted by Jane at […]

Arizona: How Not To Combat Revenge Porn

Arizona House Bill 2515 seeks to criminalize revenge porn. The only small problem: the proposed statute is blatantly unconstitutional. Here’s the text: Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Arizona: Section 1.  Title 13, chapter 14, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended by adding section 13-1425, to read: 13-1425.  Unlawful distribution of images; state of nudity; […]

Reifying Racism: Real Property as Information Law

On Friday, Carol Rose and Richard Brooks will co-star at a conference at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, titled “Saving the Neighborhood,” after their new book. (You can come! Register here.) Rose and Brooks examine the development of legalized racial segregation in housing, the gradual shift to the use of […]

Hacking Revenge Porn

I’ll be back in Brooklyn on Thursday, to take part in a fantastic NYC Legal Hackers session on revenge porn. I’m excited to hear from and learn from Lee Rowland, Mark Jaffe, and Ari Waldman. And, I’m really grateful to Phil Weiss, Jonathan Askin, David Giller, and the brilliant Legal Hackers team for this event. […]

Shark Tanks and Cybersecurity

It’s the most wonderful time of the year… for data breaches. Target may have compromised as many as 40 million credit and debit cards used by shoppers in their stores. What liability will they face? At George Mason’s excellent workshop on cybersecurity, there was a spirited debate over the mechanisms of enforcing security standards. (This […]

Copyright and the Naughty Bits

My article Exposed is now up on SSRN. It’s coming out in volume 98 of the Minnesota Law Review in 2014. Here’s the abstract: The production of intimate media – amateur, sexually explicit photos and videos – by consenting partners creates social value that warrants increased copyright protection. The unauthorized distribution of these media, such […]

Gene Patents, Oil-Eating Bacteria, and the Common Law

The Supreme Court issued its decision in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics today. A unanimous Court (with a short, quirky concurrence from Justice Scalia) held that the patent claims directed to isolated, purified DNA sequences did not recite patentable subject matter under 35 U.S.C. 101; by contrast, those directed to complementary DNA (DNA […]

Search and the First Amendment

Jane and I are in Arlington, Virginia, for a conference on Competition Policy in Search and Social Media at George Mason University. Jane, Neil Richards, Dawn Nunziato, and Stuart Benjamin will discuss the interplay of the First Amendment, regulation, and search / social media. I expect an entertaining fight over whether search results are speech, […]

Smoke If You Got ‘Em

I’m here in rainy, lovely Eugene, Oregon watching the Oregon Law Review symposium, A Step Forward: Creating a Just Drug Policy for the United States. (You can watch it live.) Jane is presenting her paper Defending the Dog – here’s the conclusion: The narcotics dog doesn’t deserve the bad reputation it has received among scholars. The […]