Celebrities, Copyright, and Cybersecurity

The fall began with a wave of hacked nude celebrity photos (as Tim notes in his great post). The release generated attention to the larger problem of revenge porn – or, more broadly, the non-consensual sharing of intimate media. Legislators and scholars have moved to tackle the problem. Danielle Citron proposes a model statute for criminalizing revenge […]

On Accuracy in Cybersecurity

I have a new article on how to address questions of accuracy in cybersecurity up on SSRN. It’s titled Schrödinger’s Cybersecurity; here’s the abstract: Both law and cybersecurity prize accuracy. Cyberattacks, such as Stuxnet, demonstrate the risks of inaccurate data. An attack can trick computer programs into making changes to information that are technically authorized but […]

ACLU Challenges Arizona Revenge Porn Law

The ACLU, ably assisted by Dentons US LLP, has filed a challenge to Arizona’s revenge porn law in federal district court (complaint, ACLU blog, WIRED story). This is great news for Arizonans: the bill was terribly drafted and unconstitutional from the moment it was signed into law. Fighting revenge porn is important, but as Arizona […]

Icanhazjurisdiction?

Alan Trammell and I have a new article coming out on the problems of personal jurisdiction analysis when it involves Internet contacts. (The title is Personal Jurisdiction and “teh Interwebs”; I tried very hard to convince Alan to go with the title of this post, to no avail.) Abstract is below; we’d love your comments […]

Why Aren’t “Hacked” Celebrities Filing Takedown Notices?

Writing today in Slate, Emily Bazelon complains that the law does not do enough to protect the privacy rights of celebrities whose accounts were illicitly “hacked” last weekend, resulting in the release of unauthorized nude photos the celebrities apparently took of themselves. Bazelon contrasts what she characterizes as the celebrities’ inability to remove their objectionable content […]

Formalism and Slow Victories in “Saving the Neighborhood”

We’re fewer than 24 hours away from seeing Carol Rose and Richard Brooks at a conference at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, titled “Saving the Neighborhood,” after their new book. (Spaces still available! Register here.) I posted about the information law aspects of racial covenants here (cross-posted by Jane at […]

Arizona: How Not To Combat Revenge Porn

Arizona House Bill 2515 seeks to criminalize revenge porn. The only small problem: the proposed statute is blatantly unconstitutional. Here’s the text: Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Arizona: Section 1.  Title 13, chapter 14, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended by adding section 13-1425, to read: 13-1425.  Unlawful distribution of images; state of nudity; […]

Video: Hacking Revenge Porn

The video from the NYC Legal Hackers event on Revenge Porn is now available. Props to Jonathan Askin, Phil Weiss, David Giller, Warren Allen, Mark Jaffe, Lee Rowland, Ari Waldman, and Jeremy Glickman for a fantastic event. And thanks so much to everyone who braved the (blinding, driving) snow to attend! It was wonderful to […]

Hacking Revenge Porn

I’ll be back in Brooklyn on Thursday, to take part in a fantastic NYC Legal Hackers session on revenge porn. I’m excited to hear from and learn from Lee Rowland, Mark Jaffe, and Ari Waldman. And, I’m really grateful to Phil Weiss, Jonathan Askin, David Giller, and the brilliant Legal Hackers team for this event. […]

Shark Tanks and Cybersecurity

It’s the most wonderful time of the year… for data breaches. Target may have compromised as many as 40 million credit and debit cards used by shoppers in their stores. What liability will they face? At George Mason’s excellent workshop on cybersecurity, there was a spirited debate over the mechanisms of enforcing security standards. (This […]