On Accuracy in Cybersecurity

I have a new article on how to address questions of accuracy in cybersecurity up on SSRN. It’s titled Schrödinger’s Cybersecurity; here’s the abstract: Both law and cybersecurity prize accuracy. Cyberattacks, such as Stuxnet, demonstrate the risks of inaccurate data. An attack can trick computer programs into making changes to information that are technically authorized but […]

Mod a Game Console, Go to Jail

I’ve been puzzling over the 6th Circuit’s new opinion in United States v. Reichert (No. 13-3479, Mar. 28, 2014), in which a divided panel affirmed a defendant’s criminal conviction for violating the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s anti-trafficking rule (17 U.S.C. § 1201(a)(2)) based on the defendant’s sale of a “modded” video game console to an […]

Cybercrime’s International Challenges

Jane and I are in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, for a conference titled “Crimes, Criminals, and the New Criminal Codes: Assessing the Effectiveness of the Legal Response” at Babes-Bolyai University. Jane is speaking on “Surveillance in a Technological Age: The Case of the NSA,” and I’m giving a talk based on my forthcoming article Ghost in the Network. […]

Shark Tanks and Cybersecurity

It’s the most wonderful time of the year… for data breaches. Target may have compromised as many as 40 million credit and debit cards used by shoppers in their stores. What liability will they face? At George Mason’s excellent workshop on cybersecurity, there was a spirited debate over the mechanisms of enforcing security standards. (This […]

The Law of Internet Intermediaries: Meet the New Boss, Same as the Old Boss

I have a short essay, Middlemen, up at the Florida Law Review Forum. It’s a response to Jacqui Lipton‘s thought-provoking article, Law of the Intermediated Information Exchange (bonus: first page is at 1337!). And, it has a footnote about turtles. Here’s the introduction: Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. The Internet was supposed […]

Search and the First Amendment

Jane and I are in Arlington, Virginia, for a conference on Competition Policy in Search and Social Media at George Mason University. Jane, Neil Richards, Dawn Nunziato, and Stuart Benjamin will discuss the interplay of the First Amendment, regulation, and search / social media. I expect an entertaining fight over whether search results are speech, […]

Cyberwar and Cyberespionage

My paper “Ghost in the Network” is available from SSRN. It’s forthcoming in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review. I’m appending the abstract and (weirdly, but I hope it will become apparent why) the conclusion below. Comments welcomed. Abstract Cyberattacks are inevitable and widespread. Existing scholarship on cyberespionage and cyberwar is undermined by its futile […]

Whereupon I Depress Lifehacker Readers

Because DVD ripping is illegal if you bypass DRM. Which, most of the time, you have to.

NZBMatrix Takes the Red Pill

I talked with Lifehacker’s IP guru Adam Dachis about the closure of several Usenet indexing services, including NZBMatrix. NZBMatrix threw in the towel after coming under twin pressures: a flood of DMCA notices related to links pointing to allegedly infringing content, and difficulty navigating the requirements of service providers such as PayPal. It’s the latest […]

The Facebook Post-Mortem

The Daily Illini has a great piece about Jason Mazzone‘s analysis of an underappreciated problem: what happens to your Facebook content when you die? At the moment, the answer depends on an unpredictable hodgepodge of state probate law, private law via the social network’s Terms of Service, and the decedent’s foresight in providing her heirs […]