Introducing our incoming fall 2014 exchange students!

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This fall, 12 students from law schools abroad are studying at HLS as part of exchange agreements. (At the same time, HLS students will be spending the semester abroad, studying in Australia, Brazil, France, Hong Kong, Japan, Mexico, South Korea, Switzerland, and the UK.)

We hope you’ll have a chance to meet these visiting students.

In this photo, left to right:

First row: Isabel Daum (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Switzerland), Clara Wack (University of Geneva, Switzerland), Sofia Reizin (University of Chile), Lucia Bíziková (Sciences Po, France), Yuxin Lin (Renmin University of China), Daniela Dias (Fundação Getulio Vargas, Brazil), Zara Desai (Sciences Po, France)

Second row: Jure Zrilic (University of Cambridge, United Kingdom), Barrie Sander (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Switzerland), Jean Grosdidier (Sciences Po, France), Giedre Lideikyte-Huber (University of Geneva, Switzerland)

Not pictured: Daniel Clarry (University of Cambridge, United Kingdom)

Where can study abroad take you? Visit the semester abroad pages in the International Legal Studies section of the HLS website, and watch the ILS Events page and this blog for postings about information sessions scheduled in September and later in the year.

Chayes Fellow Elizabeth Loftus on working with World Bank Integrity Vice-Presidency in Washington, DC

World Bank photo courtesy of Elizabeth Loftus

Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Loftus

I am loving my time at the World Bank; it is incredibly rewarding to be using my (partial) law degree to do substantive work that I care so much about.

Throughout the summer, I have had a wide variety of projects, ranging from policy research to investigations to editing statements of accusation and evidence. I am currently working on drafting my own statement of accusation and evidence from an investigation that is entirely in French (which is challenging but exciting). Serendipitously, the two policy topics I was assigned to research exactly matched my corruption-related academic interests.

The World Bank’s work environment is fantastic. One of the reasons I applied to INT was because I wanted to get a sense of what it is like to work in a professional, international setting. I feel like I have obtained exactly the sort of insight I was hoping for. I can walk around the office and hear conversations in four different languages and I’ve learned a lot about the legal cultures of different jurisdictions. My experience here has confirmed that I really derive a lot of energy from working in an international atmosphere. As a result, I’ve thought a lot about what I want to do with the remainder of my time at HLS.

Like the attorneys and investigators, the interns come from all over the world (Saudi Arabia, Indonesia, Germany, China, Afghanistan) and I’ve learned as much from them as I have from INT staff.

Elizabeth is one of 22 HLS students working this summer in 14 countries under the auspices of the Chayes International Public Service Fellowship. Please visit our Chayes Fellowship page to learn more!

Chayes Fellow Katie King on working with Equal Education Law Centre in South Africa

Table Mountain, Cape of Good Hope, Bo-Kaap district in Cape Town.

Table Mountain, Cape of Good Hope, Bo-Kaap district in Cape Town. Photos courtesy of Katie King.

My internship has been fantastic so far. The office environment is great, and right off the bat my supervisor gave me a plan for what I’d be working on the whole summer, which was wonderful–I knew immediately that I’d get to do substantive work. I just completed a memo on school overcrowding and gave my presentation on it yesterday. Next I’ll be starting a memo on either gangs in schools or how to provide education to refugee children. I also had a chance to attend a parents’ training camp this past weekend which was run by Equal Education, the mother organization of the Equal Education Law Centre (EELC). The weekend was both inspiring and challenging–seeing how skilled and passionate the parents were about advocating for their children’s education was a reminder of the potential for change, but seeing how many people wanted to talk to us about what their rights were was an equally powerful reminder of how much need there is for us to make people aware of the law and what the EELC is doing.

Outside of work, I’ve had an amazing time familiarizing myself with Cape Town and South Africa so far. The proximity of stark inequalities is unavoidable (and has led to some good conversation), but I’ve also never been to a city which has such incredible natural beauty built into the middle of it…and the food is fantastic. I’ve been wanting to come to South Africa for so long that sometimes it’s hard to believe I’m finally here. I’m definitely working hard to make the most of it.

Katie is one of 22 HLS students working this summer in 14 countries under the auspices of the Chayes International Public Service Fellowship. Please visit our Chayes Fellowship page to learn more!

Chayes Fellow Mira Chernick on working with Dejusticia in Colombia

Mira Chernick at the Dejusticia offices and Iguaque National Park in Villa de Leyva.

Mira Chernick at the Dejusticia offices and Iguaque National Park in Villa de Leyva. Photos courtesy of Mira Chernick.

“I’m really enjoying the internship! All my assignments have been substantive. I started by translating a paper written by my supervisor about land restitution from Spanish into English, which helped me develop my Spanish skills and also expanded my background knowledge of the issue I’m working on. I then moved on to researching the different institutions and actors involved in developing and implementing policies for land restitution and other services for people displaced by the armed conflict. I’m spending the rest of my time here using that research to create a policy paper describing the current situation on land restitution, the problems with current policies for victims, and proposals for improving those policies and their implementation.

Because Dejusticia has many researchers working on a wide range of human rights issues both domestically and internationally, I’ve had the opportunity to learn about much more than land restitution. I’ve had conversations (in Spanish!) with my colleagues about the challenges of designing affirmative action policies in countries like Colombia where systems of racial classification and self-identification are more complex than in the United States, alternatives to incarceration for non-violent drug crimes, and global climate change as a human rights issue. I also had the good luck to be here during both the presidential run-off elections, which determined the future of the ongoing peace negotiations between the government and the FARC, and the World Cup, in which Colombia played (beautifully!) for the first time in 16 years. Through these experiences, I have learned a great deal about Colombian public policy, politics, and culture, while doing work that is substantive and meaningful.”

Mira is one of 22 HLS students working this summer in 14 countries under the auspices of the Chayes International Public Service Fellowship. Please visit our Chayes Fellowship page to learn more!