Archive for the 'audio' Category

John Palfrey on BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever In An Age of Google [AUDIO]

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Anyone seeking to participate in the 21st century needs to understand how to find and use the vast stores of information available online. Libraries play a crucial role in making these skills and information available, and yet are at risk.

John Palfrey — Head of School at Phillips Academy, Andover and President of the Board of Directors of the Digital Public Library of America — discusses his new book, BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever In An Age of Google, in which he argues that libraries must make the transition to a digital future as soon as possible by digitizing print material and ensuring that born-digital material is publicly available online, while continuing to play the vital role as public spaces in our democracy that they have for hundreds of years.

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Radio Berkman 220: Trusting the Platform

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The more comfortable we get using digital platforms the more important it becomes to understand our relationships to them. From Facebook, to Fitbit, to Wikipedia, to networked games, and even to our schools and employers, the more we entrust our data to an outside platform, the more we have to ask the question: “How are they accountable to us?”

For this week’s podcast we spoke to four PhD candidates who are working with Microsoft Research. First, Ifeoma Ajunwa explains the tricky employers use big data collected from their employees. Then, Aleena Chia describes the unique system of governance that’s formed around the digital gaming world of Eve Online. Next, Berkman fellow Nathan Matias addresses the nuanced relationship between users and platforms where users create the content, like Wikipedia and Reddit. Finally, we speak with Stacey Blasiola about her research topic, “Newsfeed: Created by you?”

Reference Section:
Room for Debate: There’s No Guarantee of Anonymity by Ifeoma Ajunwa
The Tragedy of the Digital Commons by Nathan Matias
Event page on the web

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This week’s episode produced by Daniel Dennis Jones, and written and edited by Elizabeth Gillis.

Microsoft Research 2015 PhD Interns on Platforms, Data, and People [AUDIO]

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Microsoft Research PhD Interns Ifeoma Ajunwa, Stacy Blasiola, Nathan Matias, and Aleena Chia present their current research on corporations and the quantified self; the Facebook newsfeed algorithm; how sites like Reddit and Wikipedia are made accountable to their users and the public; and the participatory politics of online gaming.

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Christine Borgman: Data, data everywhere — but how to manage and govern? [AUDIO]

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Universities are drowning in data, not only data produced by their researchers and students, but also data they collect about their communities. Research data are subject to sharing and retention requirements by funding agencies and journals. Data from course management systems, faculty personnel records, security cameras, and social media are being used as indicators for decision making.

In this talk Christine L. Borgman — author of the new book “Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World” and Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA — identifies challenges faced by universities in managing and governing these complex categories of data.

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Radio Berkman 219: Whose App Is It Anyway?

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You may be familiar with a typical hack-day or hack-a-thon. Throw a group of developers and creators in a conference room for the weekend, and they’ll come up with some amazing app or product to make life better for all of humankind.

Radio Berkman recently stumbled on a hack-a-thon that turns hack-a-thons on their head. Last year a traveling event called Comedy Hack Day visited the MIT Media Lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Run by a group called Cultivated Wit, the goal of the hack day is to bring some laughs to the world of tech entrepreneurship. Instead of trying to attract millions of dollars in venture capital, they’re bringing comedians and developers together to create prank inventions, satirical sites, and smart phone apps to poke fun at our increasingly tech-obsessed world.

Reference Section:
Cultivated Wit, the company that organizes Comedy Hack Days all over the US
What is this cool place where Comedy Hack Day took place in 2013? That would be the MIT Media Lab.
Truth for Humanity’s video pitch!
Truth for Humanity has a special page dedicated just to Radio Berkman.
The most recent Comedy Hack day was the month in New York.

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This week’s episode produced by Daniel Dennis Jones, and written and edited by Elizabeth Gillis.

Radio Berkman 218: The Threats and Tradeoffs of Big Data

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A lot of personal information about you is completely invisible, intangible, and racing around cyberspace on a mission to pay your bills and geolocate your Facebook status. And, of course, this is useful and in a lot of ways really cool.

But today on Radio Berkman we’re going to talk about the obstacles presented by a data-driven society. How can we keep mountains of information out of the wrong hands without compromising all the great benefits we get everyday?

First, we talk to Bruce Schneier, a fellow at the Berkman Center and the author of Data and Goliath, The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World. In this book, Schneier notes that the bulk collection of data isn’t going away, but changes in policy and public perception could allow citizens to have more control over how this information gets used.

And in the second half of the show we talk to Josephine Wolff, who is also a Berkman Fellow and PhD candidate in the Engineering Systems Division at MIT studying cybersecurity and Internet policy. If you were concerned by the major credit card or email breaches of the last few years, you’ll want to hear this.

Reference Section:
Schneier on Security
Bruce Schneier’s TED talk (20 min.)
Josephine Wolff on Slate

This episode features Creative Commons licensed content from:
Neurowaxx
MorganTJ
Mark van Laera

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This week’s episode produced and edited by Daniel Dennis Jones, with Sara Marie Watson, Elizabeth Gillis, Carrie Tian, and Gretchen Weber.

Melody Kramer on Expanding the Definition of Membership in Public Media [AUDIO]

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What does it mean to be a member of a public radio station in the United States? What could it mean? How could expanding the definition of membership instill a sense of ownership and identity among listeners, allowing them to feel more connected and invested in the work we do?

In this talk Melody Kramer — a 2014-2015 Visiting Nieman Fellow at Harvard University and Peabody award-winning public media producer, strategist, and developer — discusses a framework for a new model of public media membership that doesn’t just depend on financial pledges, but donations of skills or time.

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Radio Berkman 217: Don’t Hate the Player, Change the Game

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Few sectors of the networked environment get a worse reputation for hate speech than online gaming. Competitive games with chat functions have always involved some level of trash talking. Slurs, shaming, and casual threats are part of the players’ toolkit for riling up their opponent.

But the toxicity levels of video game forums have reached a dangerous point. Unregulated and unchecked, many gaming networks have become zones where cyberbullying, misogyny, racism, and homophobic language are the norm.

At least one gaming company has decided that this behavior should NOT be the norm. In 2012, Riot Games – makers of the insanely popular League of Legends (over 60 million players around the world) – hired a cognitive neuroscientist named Jeffrey “Lyte” Lin to “game” the game. Jeffrey is in charge of building social systems that de-incentivize bad behavior and bring about a more sportsman-like culture.

On today’s episode, we talk to Jeffrey about what the web can learn from how games are fighting hate speech.

This is the first episode in a series on hate speech online. If you have any comments, or suggestions for future guests and topics, leave us a note in the comments, or send us a tweet!

Reference Section:
More on Jeffrey’s work with Riot
A great primer from PBS on how hate speech destroys games

This episode features Creative Commons Music from:
Chad Crouch
Timo Timonen

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This week’s episode produced and edited by Daniel Dennis Jones and Carrie Tian, with help from Gretchen Weber.

John Kropf and Neal Cohen on The Guide to U.S. Government Practice on Global Information Sharing [AUDIO]

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There are any number of compelling reasons the US would want to have a good information relationship with other countries, from counter-terrorism and cyber-crime prevention, to simple tax identification. This information sharing is not only necessary to strengthen relations with foreign governments but to protect the country from threats, foreign and domestic. But how does the U.S. government share such personal information with foreign governments?

John Kropf — Corporate Privacy Executive for Northrop Grumman and former Deputy Chief Privacy Officer for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security — and Neal Cohen — Berkman Fellow and part of the Privacy & Security practice group at Perkins Coie LLP — discuss information sharing matters covered by their new book “Guide to U.S. Government Practice on Global Sharing of Personal Information, Second Edition,” as well as developments which have occurred over the past year, including the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations and the renegotiation of the Safe Harbor Framework.

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Jim Bessen on Economic Inequality and Technology: How Knowledge Sharing Helps [AUDIO]

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Today we feel the impact of technology everywhere except in our paychecks. In the past, technological advancements dramatically increased wages, but during the last three decades, the median wage has remained stagnant. Machines have taken over much of the work of humans, destroying old jobs while increasing profits for business owners.

In this talk, James Bessen — Lecturer in Law at the Boston University School of Law and author of the new book “Learning by Doing: The Real Connection Between Innovation, Wages, and Wealth” — argues that workers can benefit by acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to implement rapidly evolving technologies and sharing knowledge. Bessen is joined in conversation by Berkman Faculty Associate Karim Lakhani

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