Archive for the 'Berkman Center' Category

Ronald Deibert on the World After Snowden: Towards Distributed Security in Cyberspace [AUDIO]

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In this talk Ron Deibert — Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Canada Centre for Global Security Studies and the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto — puts the revelations of NSA wiretapping in a broader context, emphasizing the political economy of the cyber security industrial complex and its unintended consequences in a world of Big Data, along with an alternative approach to securing cyberspace, drawing from his recent book, Black Code.

Download the MP3

…or download the OGG audio format!

More info on this event here.

Justin Reich on Personalized Learning, Backpacks Full of Cash, Rockstar Teachers, and MOOC Madness [AUDIO]

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For decades, policymakers and futurists have heralded digital tools as essential to the the future of learning. Has the moment of disruptive transformational revolution finally arrived? If we are at a watershed moment, what futures are available to us?

Justin Reich — visiting lecturer at MIT, Berkman fellow, and educational researcher — discusses the intersection of technology, free-market ideology, and media hype in U.S. education reform.

Download the MP3

…or download the OGG audio format!

More info on this event here.

UPDATE: a bevy of notes, slides, and tweets from this event

Andrew Lowenthal on Citizen Video and Networked Politics in Southeast Asia

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Citizen video in Southeast Asia has exploded in recent times, and has come to play a significant role in national and regional politics, documenting spectacular events, spearheading campaigns and uncovering scandals.

In this discussion, Andrew Lowenthal — Co-Founder and Executive Director of EngageMedia, an Asia-Pacific human rights and environmental video project — outlines EngageMedia’s approach to video4change and their work in the region, in particular looking at West Papua, (a remote region of Indonesia that has been waging an independence campaign for more than 40 years), the development of regional, cross-border and multilingual video networks, and the effect and possibility of the internet and online media to generate new post-national political configurations and collaborations.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Andrew Lowenthal on Citizen Video and Networked Politics in Southeast Asia [AUDIO]

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Citizen video in Southeast Asia has exploded in recent times, and has come to play a significant role in national and regional politics, documenting spectacular events, spearheading campaigns and uncovering scandals.

In this discussion, Andrew Lowenthal — Co-Founder and Executive Director of EngageMedia, an Asia-Pacific human rights and environmental video project — outlines EngageMedia’s approach to video4change and their work in the region, in particular looking at West Papua, (a remote region of Indonesia that has been waging an independence campaign for more than 40 years), the development of regional, cross-border and multilingual video networks, and the effect and possibility of the internet and online media to generate new post-national political configurations and collaborations.

Download the MP3

…or download the OGG audio format!

More info on this event here.

RB202: Memeology

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ROFLCon III

Listen: or download | …also in Ogg

Two weeks ago, the Berkman Center co-sponsored the third –  and, we learned, final! –  ROFLCon. For the n00bz, ROFLCon is a conference named after the acronym for “rolling on the floor, laughing” and devoted to celebrating internet culture. Friend of the Show Tim Hwang co-founded the event in 2008 when he and Christina Xu invited Tron Guy to Cambridge.

Both ROFLCon and internet culture have evolved since then, so we sent producer Frances Harlow on location to ask attendees, “What are memes, and do they really matter?”

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RB 194: The Wiki 1%

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Listen: or download | …also in Ogg

This week at Radio Berkman we tried something new.

During our recent interview with Berkman Fellow Justin Reich about his report The State of Wiki Usage in U.S. K-12 Schools: Leveraging Web 2.0 Data Warehouses to Assess Quality and Equity in Online Learning Environments, we learned that only one percent of educational wikis succeed in creating the kind of multimedia, collaborative learning environment we have come to associate with open educational resources like PBWikis and Wikispaces.

Justin’s findings, and their implications, are so intriguing that we decided it was time to go into the field and do some investigative work of our own. Radio Berkman wanted to know: Who is making those successful wikis and how?

Producer Frances Harlow spent a day at Thayer Academy in Braintree, Massachusetts sitting in on professional development sessions and interviewing instructors, including

  • Director of Studies and History Department Head (and classroom wiki “missionary”) Matt Dunne
  • Veteran History teacher Norma Atkinson
Listen to what she found and be sure to let us know what you think of this Radio Berkman experiment!

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RB 193: Facts Are Boring

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Listen: or download | …also in Ogg

This week we tear apart the difference between Truth, Fact, and Evidence, and the quiet, but irreplaceable, role of the humble factchecker in our media:

  • Author/factchecker Jim Fingal on the Lifespan of a Fact
  • Former GQ intern and factchecker Gillian Brassil on how factcheckers get paid to watch True Blood
  • Veteran Atlantic Monthly factchecking department head Yvonne Rolzhausen on the underinvestment of media resources for factchecking
  • David Weinberger, author of the recent book Too Big To Know on what a fact is and why they don’t make for good storytelling

Listen up! Comment on the show! Tweet us!

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RB 192: Wikis, Teaching, and the Digital Divide

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Listen: or download | …also in Ogg

Technology has made us all kinds of promises when it comes to transforming the way we learn — not least of which was the promise to break the “digital divide.” The ease of communication promised by the web would allow the economically disenfranchised to have access to ideas and collaborative resources more commonly found in affluent schools.

So it is assumed.

In fact there is some evidence showing that some educational technologies are used less effectively in poor schools than in rich ones.

Today’s guest, Berkman Fellow Justin Reich, gathered data on the usage of some 180,000 publicly accessible wikis used for collaboration and education in school settings for his report The State of Wiki Usage in U.S. K-12 Schools: Leveraging Web 2.0 Data Warehouses to Assess Quality and Equity in Online Learning Environments. What he found was that wikis were generally less helpful to poor schools than conventional wisdom might have us believe.

He talked to David Weinberger about his findings.

Listen up! Comment on the show! Tweet us!

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Help Radio Berkman!

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Hey folks! We’re hoping to take Radio Berkman in some amazing new directions this Spring, but we want your feedback.

Should we change our name? How can we tell better stories? What’s missing from current reporting on tech and internet issues?

We’ve made up a cute little survey right here, and would love for you to drop us some thoughts!

AGAIN, THAT SURVEY IS HERE

If you’re a regular listener, or just finding us for the first time, help us out with some ideas, would you?

danah boyd on Teen Privacy Strategies in Networked Publics

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At the Hyperpublic Symposium, danah boyd of Microsoft Research discusses how young people adapt to and modify norms and techniques for privacy on social networks. Jeffrey Schnapp of the Metalab moderates.

The Hyperpublic symposium brings together computer scientists, ethnographers, architects, historians, artists and legal scholars to discuss how design influences privacy and public space, how it shapes and is shaped by human behavior and experience, and how it can cultivate norms such as tolerance and diversity.

This symposium was held on June 10, 2011 at Harvard University. Find out more here.

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