Archive for the 'video' Category

Ali Hashmi on Ideology and Text: Classifying and Analyzing Discourse using Machine Learning

0

We can use technology to uncover patterns in data. But it’s much harder to uncover an “ideology” embedded in text.

In this talk, Ali Hashmi — a researcher at the MIT Center for Civic Media — discusses a tool he has created that uses data-driven approaches for classifying discourse in news media. Using an analysis of discourse on Islam in the mainstream media, the tool reveals how media coverage in several mainstream news sources tends to contextualize Muslims largely as a group embroiled in conflict at a disproportionately large level.

Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

John Palfrey on BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever In An Age of Google

0

Anyone seeking to participate in the 21st century needs to understand how to find and use the vast stores of information available online. Libraries play a crucial role in making these skills and information available, and yet are at risk.

John Palfrey — Head of School at Phillips Academy, Andover and President of the Board of Directors of the Digital Public Library of America — discusses his new book, BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever In An Age of Google, in which he argues that libraries must make the transition to a digital future as soon as possible by digitizing print material and ensuring that born-digital material is publicly available online, while continuing to play the vital role as public spaces in our democracy that they have for hundreds of years.

Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Microsoft Research 2015 PhD Interns on Platforms, Data, and People

0

Microsoft Research PhD Interns Ifeoma Ajunwa, Stacy Blasiola, Nathan Matias, and Aleena Chia present their current research on corporations and the quantified self; the Facebook newsfeed algorithm; how sites like Reddit and Wikipedia are made accountable to their users and the public; and the participatory politics of online gaming.

Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Christine Borgman: Data, data everywhere — but how to manage and govern?

0

Universities are drowning in data, not only data produced by their researchers and students, but also data they collect about their communities. Research data are subject to sharing and retention requirements by funding agencies and journals. Data from course management systems, faculty personnel records, security cameras, and social media are being used as indicators for decision making.

In this talk Christine L. Borgman — author of the new book “Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World” and Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA — identifies challenges faced by universities in managing and governing these complex categories of data.

Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Melody Kramer on Expanding the Definition of Membership in Public Media

0

What does it mean to be a member of a public radio station in the United States? What could it mean? How could expanding the definition of membership instill a sense of ownership and identity among listeners, allowing them to feel more connected and invested in the work we do?

In this talk Melody Kramer — a 2014-2015 Visiting Nieman Fellow at Harvard University and Peabody award-winning public media producer, strategist, and developer — discusses a framework for a new model of public media membership that doesn’t just depend on financial pledges, but donations of skills or time.

Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

John Kropf and Neal Cohen on The Guide to U.S. Government Practice on Global Information Sharing

0

There are any number of compelling reasons the US would want to have a good information relationship with other countries, from counter-terrorism and cyber-crime prevention, to simple tax identification. This information sharing is not only necessary to strengthen relations with foreign governments but to protect the country from threats, foreign and domestic. But how does the U.S. government share such personal information with foreign governments?

John Kropf — Corporate Privacy Executive for Northrop Grumman and former Deputy Chief Privacy Officer for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security — and Neal Cohen — Berkman Fellow and part of the Privacy & Security practice group at Perkins Coie LLP — discuss information sharing matters covered by their new book “Guide to U.S. Government Practice on Global Sharing of Personal Information, Second Edition,” as well as developments which have occurred over the past year, including the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations and the renegotiation of the Safe Harbor Framework.

Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Jim Bessen on Economic Inequality and Technology: How Knowledge Sharing Helps

0

Today we feel the impact of technology everywhere except in our paychecks. In the past, technological advancements dramatically increased wages, but during the last three decades, the median wage has remained stagnant. Machines have taken over much of the work of humans, destroying old jobs while increasing profits for business owners.

In this talk, James Bessen — Lecturer in Law at the Boston University School of Law and author of the new book “Learning by Doing: The Real Connection Between Innovation, Wages, and Wealth” — argues that workers can benefit by acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to implement rapidly evolving technologies and sharing knowledge. Bessen is joined in conversation by Berkman Faculty Associate Karim Lakhani


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Willow Brugh on Distributed and Digital Disaster Response

1

The citizen response to 2012’s Hurricane Sandy was in many important ways more effective than the response from established disaster response institutions like FEMA. New York-based response efforts like Occupy Sandy leveraged existing community networks and digital tools to find missing people; provide food, shelter, and medical assistance; and offer a hub for volunteers and donors.

In this talk Willow Brugh — Berkman fellow and Professor of Practice at Brown University — demonstrates examples ranging from Oklahoma to Tanzania where such distributed and digital disaster response have proved successful, and empowered citizens to respond in ways traditional institutions cannot.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Development in the Digital Age: The Role of Online Platforms & Payments in Enabling Entrepreneurship in Emerging Markets

0

The Internet is democratizing access to the global marketplace for millions of people around the world. Thanks to online platforms, payment systems and logistics services, companies, nonprofits and individuals can embark on global journeys like never before.

In this conversation, Usman Ahmed — Policy Counsel for eBay Inc — and Jake Colvin — Executive Director of the Global Innovation Forum at the National Foreign Trade Council — explore the opportunities for economic development that the Internet unlocks, and the specific challenges that global entrepreneurs and micromultinationals in developing countries face.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

The Digital Problem-Solving Initiative (DPSI) at Harvard

0

The Digital Problem-Solving Initiative (DPSI, or “dip-see”) at Harvard University, is an innovative and collaborative project, hosted through the Berkman Center. DPSI brings together a diverse group of learners (students, faculty, fellows, and staff) to work on projects to address challenges and opportunities across the university.

In this talk DPSI participants showcase: a smartphone app to reduce campus assault; a method statisticians can use to protect the anonymity of their subjects; and an innovative, immersive documentary project.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Log in