Archive for the 'video' Category

Tricia Wang on Talking to Strangers: Chinese Youth and Social Media

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When we read about the Chinese internet in the Western press, we usually hear stories about censorship, political repression, and instability. But Chinese youth are actually sharing information and socializing with strangers online much more than those in the West suspect, finding ways to semi-anonymously connect to each other and establish a web of casual trust that extends beyond particularistic guanxi ties and authoritarian institutions.

In this talk, Tricia Wang — visiting scholar at New York University’s Interactive Telecommunication Program and a Berkman Fellow — argues that the activity of Chinese youth online reflects a new form of sociality: an Elastic Self, a new sociality which is laying the groundwork for a public sphere to emerge from ties primarily based on friendship and interactions founded on a casual web of public trust.

More links for Tricia:

  • @triciawang
  • Tricia Wang’s website
  • Tricia’s blog: Ethnography Matters
  • Willow Brugh’s VizThink of Tricia’s Presentation


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  • Defending an Unowned Internet: Opportunities for Technology, Policy, and Corporations

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    In the wake of the disclosures about government surveillance and the rise of corporate-run applications and protocols, is the idea of an “unowned” Internet still a credible one? The Berkman Center’s Jonathan Zittrain moderates a panel, including Yochai Benkler — Harvard Law School — Ebele Okobi — Yahoo! — Bruce Schneier — CO3 Systems — and Benjamin Wittes — Brookings Institution to explore surveillance, and the potential for reforms in policy, technology, and corporate and consumer behavior.


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    Veni Markovski on 2014 High-Level Conferences on ICT and the Internet: What Do They Mean for the Internet As We Know It?

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    In October, President of Brazil Dilma Roussef announced a high-level meeting on Internet governance to be held in April in Rio de Janeiro. ITU will have not one, not two, but three international meetings, and will be tackling Internet issues.

    As governments initiate talks about policies with regards to who controls the Internet, Veni Markovski — the ICANN vice-president for Russia, CIS and Eastern Europe – explores how the 2014 landscape of Internet governance may change.

    Read more about Veni here and here.


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    Margot Kaminski on Robotic Surveillance: Authorship or Intrusion?

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    As the use of robotic technology expands private third-party surveillance will also expand to new locations and scenarios. Is it possible — or desirable — to craft meaningful laws or guidelines before widespread private adoption of robots?

    In this talk Margot E. Kaminski — Research Scholar in Law, Executive Director of the Information Society Project, and Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School — explores how the pending increase in robotic surveillance poses new questions for U.S. privacy law, and the extents to which robotic surveillance will be necessary, superfluous, or deliberately intrusive.


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    Eszter Hargittai and Aaron Shaw on Internet Skills and Wikipedia’s Gender Inequality

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    Although women are just as likely as men to read Wikipedia, they only represent an estimated 16% of global Wikipedia editors and 23% of U.S. adult Wikipedia editors.

    In this talk, Eszter Hargittai — Delaney Family Professor in the Communication Studies Department and Faculty Associate of the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University, and Aaron Shaw — Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at Northwestern University — discuss findings from their recent study of both Wikipedia contributors and non-contributors showing that the gender gap in editing is exacerbated by a similarly important Internet skills gap. They suggest efforts ways of overcoming the gender gap in Wikipedia contributions by addressing the Web-use skills gap, and paths for future research.


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    Nicholas Gruen on Government as Impresario: Emergent Public Goods and Public Private Partnerships 2.0

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    We’re used to thinking that public goods must be produced by governments. But there’s a fundamental and growing class of public goods that emerge from private interaction. Today emergent public goods — Twitter, Facebook, Wikipedia — burgeon on the internet ushering in a new age. But there must exist a panoply of public goods which could be brought into existence by the right kind of partnership between private and public endeavor.

    In this talk, Nicholas Gruen — a widely published policy economist, entrepreneur and commentator who has been a regular columnist in the Courier Mail, the Australian Financial Review, the Age and the Sydney Morning Herald — explores the economic basis for public/private partnerships, and shares examples of innovative partnerships that thrive in the internet age.


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    Sara Boettiger on Re-Thinking Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Models for the Poor

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    The world faces a growing population, resource constraints, climate change, and a global food system under stress. But new technology is limited in its ability to address the problems facing those in poverty. 780 million still lack access to clean water. 1/5 of humanity lives without electricity. 80% of sub-Saharan Africa is farmed with a hand-hoe.

    Sara Boettiger — Senior Advisor at Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture and Assistant Adjunct Professor at UC Berkeley — will discuss the need to re-think existing models of Intellectual Property Rights (e.g. patent pools, clearinghouses, humanitarian use licensing), re-invent our research agenda, and work to shift the international debate.


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    Jerome Hergueux on Cooperation in a Peer Production Economy: Experimental Evidence from Wikipedia

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    From Wikipedia to Open Source Software, Peer Production –- a large-scale collaborative model of production primarily based on voluntary contributions –- is emerging as an economically significant production model alongside firms, markets and governments. Yet, its impressive success remains difficult to explain through the assumptions of standard economic theory.

    In this talk, Jerome Hergueux — Ph.D. candidate in Economics at Sciences Po (Department of Economics) and the University of Strasbourg (Institute of Political Studies) and Berkman Fellow — reflects on the prosocial foundations of cooperation in this new Peer Production economy, taking Wikipedia as one paradigmatic example, and asks: how can we start to build a workable theory of individuals’ motivations to freely contribute time and efforts for the provision of global public goods?


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    Kate Darling on Near-term Ethical, Legal, and Societal Issues in Robotics

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    Prominent robot ethics questions focus on liability and privacy concerns in the face of increasingly autonomous technology. A lesser-discussed issue is the emergence and effect of robots that are designed to interact with humans on a social level. Studies have begun to establish a tendency to perceive social robots differently than we do other objects. As more and more robotic companions enter into our lives and homes, our inclination to project life-like qualities onto robots could have some societal implications.

    Kate Darling — IP Research Specialist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab and a Ph.D. candidate in Intellectual Property and Law & Economics at the ETH Zurich — discusses some of the more interesting developments in the world of robot/human interaction, and where we might find ourselves in the coming decades.


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    Edward Lee on How People Defeated Hollywood and Saved the Internet–For Now

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    SOPA and ACTA, two controversial copyright proposals in the United States and European Union that many feared would lead to Internet censorship, came into the mainstream when people used Facebook, Twitter, other social media, blogs, and websites to organize and launch protests.

    In this talk Edward Lee — Professor of Law and the Director of the Program in Intellectual Property Law at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law — explains how a grassroots movement involving millions of people was able to defeat money, politicians, Hollywood, and the copyright lobby, all in the name of a “free and open Internet.”


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