Lauren McCarthy: You, Me, and My Computer

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Can we use technology to help us be more human? To smile more, to touch and to listen to each other? What if a computer could understand and make decisions about our social relationships better than we could ourselves? Would our interactions be improved by computationally determining what to do and say? What happens if we crowdsource our dating lives and actually find love?

In this talk Lauren McCarthy — artist, programmer, and adjunct faculty at RISD and NYU ITP — attempts to understand these questions through an artistic practice involving hacking, design, and self-experimentation.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Lauren McCarthy: You, Me, and My Computer [AUDIO]

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Can we use technology to help us be more human? To smile more, to touch and to listen to each other? What if a computer could understand and make decisions about our social relationships better than we could ourselves? Would our interactions be improved by computationally determining what to do and say? What happens if we crowdsource our dating lives and actually find love?

In this talk Lauren McCarthy — artist, programmer, and adjunct faculty at RISD and NYU ITP — attempts to understand these questions through an artistic practice involving hacking, design, and self-experimentation.

Download the MP3

…or download the OGG audio format!

More info on this event here.

Malavika Jayaram: Does Size Matter? A Tale of Performing Welfare, Producing Bodies, and Faking Identity

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India’s identity project is the the world’s largest biometric database — currently consisting of almost 600 million enrolled. By locating this techno-utopian vision within the larger surveillance state that a unique identifier facilitates, Malavika Jayaram — lawyer, Berkman Fellow, and Fellow at the Centre for Internet and Society, Bangalore — describes the ‘welfare industrial complex’ that imagines the poor as the next emerging market. She highlights the risks of the body as password, of implementing e-governance in a legal vacuum, and of digitization reinforcing existing inequalities. By offering a perspective that is somewhat different from the traditional western focus of privacy, she hopes to generate a more inclusive discourse about what it means to be autonomous and empowered in the face of paternalistic development projects.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Malavika Jayaram: Does Size Matter? A Tale of Performing Welfare, Producing Bodies, and Faking Identity [AUDIO]

0

India’s identity project is the the world’s largest biometric database — currently consisting of almost 600 million enrolled. By locating this techno-utopian vision within the larger surveillance state that a unique identifier facilitates, Malavika Jayaram — lawyer, Berkman Fellow, and Fellow at the Centre for Internet and Society, Bangalore — describes the ‘welfare industrial complex’ that imagines the poor as the next emerging market. She highlights the risks of the body as password, of implementing e-governance in a legal vacuum, and of digitization reinforcing existing inequalities. By offering a perspective that is somewhat different from the traditional western focus of privacy, she hopes to generate a more inclusive discourse about what it means to be autonomous and empowered in the face of paternalistic development projects.

Download the MP3

…or download the OGG audio format!

More info on this event here.

Hasit Shah on Cheap Smartphones, Digital News, & the World’s Biggest Election

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More than a sixth of Indians have access to the Internet, leaving a billion people behind. But smartphones are getting cheaper and mobile internet connections are becoming more easily available. The new Internet users will demand content that won’t be in English, that doesn’t necessarily demand high levels of literacy and works well on basic devices with erratic connections.

In this talk Hasit Shah — Nieman-Berkman Fellow at Harvard and Senior Producer for BBC News in London — discusses India’s first proper “digital” election, and how Internet-based campaigning is making this one to watch.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Hasit Shah on Cheap Smartphones, Digital News, & the World’s Biggest Election [AUDIO]

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More than a sixth of Indians have access to the Internet, leaving a billion people behind. But smartphones are getting cheaper and mobile internet connections are becoming more easily available. The new Internet users will demand content that won’t be in English, that doesn’t necessarily demand high levels of literacy and works well on basic devices with erratic connections.

In this talk Hasit Shah — Nieman-Berkman Fellow at Harvard and Senior Producer for BBC News in London — discusses India’s first proper “digital” election, and how Internet-based campaigning is making this one to watch.

Download the MP3

…or download the OGG audio format!

More info on this event here.

RB213: The Public Spectrum

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Listen:or download | …also in Ogg

Most of the spectrum of frequency that exists in the US is occupied or owned by large wireless corporations, cable companies, by the government. But at least one small chunk of spectrum — “low-band spectrum” wireless, or TV white spaces (so-called because it is the space between the television dials) — has been somewhat open to the public.

There are thousands of devices on the market that take advantage of this spectrum without paying a license fee, allowing consumers to transmit bits without interference from walls, trees, or radiation from devices like microwaves.

But the Federal Communications Commission is now deciding whether to auction off this spectrum to the highest bidder, putting at risk not only billions of dollars in economic activity, but also very fundamental concepts of affordable public access to information spaces. And on May 15th, just a couple days away from this podcast, the FCC will be holding an open meeting to discuss whether auctioning off this spectrum would be a good idea.

Harold Feld, senior vice president for Public Knowledge, recently sat down with David Weinberger to talk about why we should be concerned about auctioning off this spectrum.

Listen up! Comment on the show! Tweet us! Find us on Soundcloud!
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Sara Watson on Living with Data: Stories that Make Data More Personal

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We are becoming data. Between our mobile phones, browser history, wearable sensors, and connected devices in our homes, there’s more data about us than ever before. So how are we learning to live with all this data?

Inspired by her ethnographic interview work with members of the quantified self community, Berkman fellow Sara M. Watson discusses these larger systemic shifts through personal narratives that reveal how we find clues, investigate, and reverse engineer what’s going on with our data.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Sara Watson on Living with Data: Stories that Make Data More Personal [AUDIO]

1

We are becoming data. Between our mobile phones, browser history, wearable sensors, and connected devices in our homes, there’s more data about us than ever before. So how are we learning to live with all this data?

Inspired by her ethnographic interview work with members of the quantified self community, Berkman fellow Sara M. Watson discusses these larger systemic shifts through personal narratives that reveal how we find clues, investigate, and reverse engineer what’s going on with our data.

Download the MP3

…or download the OGG audio format!

More info on this event here.

Elisa Kreisinger on Fair Use(r): Art and Copyright Online

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With the democratization of content creation came the democratization of the overzealous copyright claim. Do private agreements between copyright holders and hosting platforms such as YouTube’s Content ID system compromise artist’s fair use rights?

In this open discussion Elisa Kreisinger — Brooklyn-based video artist and artist-in-residence at Public Knowledge — invites artists, users, and lawyers to share their copyright experiences with hosting platforms, and debate the future of distributing digital arts works online.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

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