Willow Brugh on Distributed and Digital Disaster Response [AUDIO]

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The citizen response to 2012’s Hurricane Sandy was in many important ways more effective than the response from established disaster response institutions like FEMA. New York-based response efforts like Occupy Sandy leveraged existing community networks and digital tools to find missing people; provide food, shelter, and medical assistance; and offer a hub for volunteers and donors.

In this talk Willow Brugh — Berkman fellow and Professor of Practice at Brown University — demonstrates examples ranging from Oklahoma to Tanzania where such distributed and digital disaster response have proved successful, and empowered citizens to respond in ways traditional institutions cannot.

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…or download the OGG audio format!

More info on this event here.

Friend of the Show: Ben Walker’s “Theory of Everything”

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Benjamen Walker has always had his finger on the pulse of the most overlooked and under-explored facets of culture and technology through his podcast Theory of Everything. This week he visits with the Maroons – descendants of escaped slaves who established free communities in the mountains of Jamaica – and explores their relationship to the political establishment of Jamaica, and their tastes in radio.

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From Ben:

Decades before the first shot was fired in the American revolution a band of runaway slaves known as the Maroons living in the mountains in Colonial Jamaica took on the British Empire and won. I’ve long been obsessed with the Maroons and so last summer I jumped at the opportunity to visit their compound in Charlestown for the annual celebration of their 1739 victory. I learned the Maroons hope to play a leading role today as Jamaica moves down the path of Marijuana decriminalization and legalization, but some of the folks I met claim the Maroons are still listening to Radio What’s Innit Fo Me?

Find more of Ben Walker’s terrific “Theory of Everything” podcast here.

Development in the Digital Age: The Role of Online Platforms & Payments in Enabling Entrepreneurship in Emerging Markets

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The Internet is democratizing access to the global marketplace for millions of people around the world. Thanks to online platforms, payment systems and logistics services, companies, nonprofits and individuals can embark on global journeys like never before.

In this conversation, Usman Ahmed — Policy Counsel for eBay Inc — and Jake Colvin — Executive Director of the Global Innovation Forum at the National Foreign Trade Council — explore the opportunities for economic development that the Internet unlocks, and the specific challenges that global entrepreneurs and micromultinationals in developing countries face.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Development in the Digital Age: The Role of Online Platforms & Payments in Enabling Entrepreneurship in Emerging Markets [AUDIO]

0

The Internet is democratizing access to the global marketplace for millions of people around the world. Thanks to online platforms, payment systems and logistics services, companies, nonprofits and individuals can embark on global journeys like never before.

In this conversation, Usman Ahmed — Policy Counsel for eBay Inc — and Jake Colvin — Executive Director of the Global Innovation Forum at the National Foreign Trade Council — explore the opportunities for economic development that the Internet unlocks, and the specific challenges that global entrepreneurs and micromultinationals in developing countries face.

Download the MP3

…or download the OGG audio format!

More info on this event here.

The Digital Problem-Solving Initiative (DPSI) at Harvard

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The Digital Problem-Solving Initiative (DPSI, or “dip-see”) at Harvard University, is an innovative and collaborative project, hosted through the Berkman Center. DPSI brings together a diverse group of learners (students, faculty, fellows, and staff) to work on projects to address challenges and opportunities across the university.

In this talk DPSI participants showcase: a smartphone app to reduce campus assault; a method statisticians can use to protect the anonymity of their subjects; and an innovative, immersive documentary project.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

The Digital Problem-Solving Initiative (DPSI) at Harvard [AUDIO]

0

The Digital Problem-Solving Initiative (DPSI, or “dip-see”) at Harvard University, is an innovative and collaborative project, hosted through the Berkman Center. DPSI brings together a diverse group of learners (students, faculty, fellows, and staff) to work on projects to address challenges and opportunities across the university.

In this talk DPSI participants showcase: a smartphone app to reduce campus assault; a method statisticians can use to protect the anonymity of their subjects; and an innovative, immersive documentary project.

Download the MP3

…or download the OGG audio format!

More info on this event here.

Aimee Corrigan on #StopEbola: What Nigeria Did Right

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On July 20, 2014 the Ebola outbreak landed in Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country. Public health officials warned that an outbreak could be catastrophic in Lagos, a densely populated city of 21 million. 19 confirmed cases left 11 dead from the disease, but Nigeria’s nightmare scenario never occurred. Within three months, the World Health Organization declared Nigeria Ebola-free, deeming the nation’s efforts to contain the disease a “spectacular success story”.

In a country with 130 million mobile-phone users and active social networks, social media and mobile technology played a central role in Nigeria’s Ebola containment.

In this talk Aimee Corrigan — Co-Director of Nollywood Workshops, a hub for filmmakers in Lagos, Nigeria — discusses how viral video, SMS, and social media were used to sensitize audiences, manage fear and myths, and reduce stigma around Ebola. And how these strategies might be utilized in public health challenges in Africa and beyond.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

Aimee Corrigan on #StopEbola: What Nigeria Did Right [AUDIO]

0

On July 20, 2014 the Ebola outbreak landed in Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country. Public health officials warned that an outbreak could be catastrophic in Lagos, a densely populated city of 21 million. 19 confirmed cases left 11 dead from the disease, but Nigeria’s nightmare scenario never occurred. Within three months, the World Health Organization declared Nigeria Ebola-free, deeming the nation’s efforts to contain the disease a “spectacular success story”.

In a country with 130 million mobile-phone users and active social networks, social media and mobile technology played a central role in Nigeria’s Ebola containment.

In this talk Aimee Corrigan — Co-Director of Nollywood Workshops, a hub for filmmakers in Lagos, Nigeria — discusses how viral video, SMS, and social media were used to sensitize audiences, manage fear and myths, and reduce stigma around Ebola. And how these strategies might be utilized in public health challenges in Africa and beyond.

Download the MP3

…or download the OGG audio format!

More info on this event here.

RB 215: Prometheus and the Dolphins

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8086160955_ec43417d52_oListen:or download | …also in Ogg

Want to create artificially intelligent machines? Want to find aliens? You might want to try talking to nature first.

Philosophers, animal behaviorists, and scientists have worked for decades to get animals to speak “human.” Researchers have even cohabited with primates and dolphins to see if they could somehow connect. Some suggested that by bringing animals into the human community we could actually keep from killing ourselves with increasingly risky technologies.

Disappointingly, we’ve never quite reached that Dr. Doolittle ideal of sitting down and chatting with any member of the animal kingdom. There are huge gaps between animals and human beings that prevent a satisfying level of comprehension.

But these efforts can teach us a lot about how to develop machines that can communicate with us, and how we might understand extra-terrestrials (if and when that ever happens).

Matthew Battles of the Berkman Center’s MetaLAB has been looking at the cultural dimensions of science in the 20th century. He spoke with us this week about how science helps us understand animals, technology, and our place in the universe.

Listen up! Comment on the show! Tweet us! Find us on Soundcloud!
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Carrie James on Disconnected: Youth, New Media, and the Ethics Gap

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Fresh from a party, a teen posts a photo on Facebook of a friend drinking a beer. A college student repurposes an article from Wikipedia for a paper. A group of players in a multiplayer online game routinely cheat new players by selling them worthless virtual accessories for high prices. How do youth, and the adults in their lives, think about the moral and ethical dimensions of their participation in online communities?

In this talk Carrie James — Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and author of “Disconnected: Youth, New Media, and the Ethics Gap” — explores how young people approach questionable situations online as well as more dramatic ethical dilemmas that arise in digital contexts.


Also in ogg for download

More info on this event here.

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