Thank You!

Dear All,

Many thanks for your participation in our “Truthiness in Digital Media” Symposium and Hack Day on March 6-7. It was an exciting opportunity to advance a shared understanding of the challenges of discerning trustworthiness, bad facts and framing, and to consider our own biases in the context of the increasingly complicated networked media ecosystem. Our progress was fueled by diverse and talented group of people who lead and engaged in the sessions. Indeed, we offer our most hearty thanks for your insights, energy and commitment. Continue reading

Doing Something About Truthiness in Politics and News

About the Author:

Craig Newmark

Craig Newmark

Craig Newmark is an Internet entrepreneur best known for being the founder of the Craigslist.

Recently, the folks at the Harvard Berkman Center and the MIT Media Lab had a really good conference and hackathon addressing Truthiness in Digital Media. That’s in the Stephen Colbert sense, where people make up stuff which they want to be true. A lot of good progress was reported, particularly involving citizens and professionals working together to do serious factchecking. Continue reading

Three Social Theorems

About the Author:

Panagiotis "Takis" Metaxas

Panagiotis "Takis" Metaxas

Panagiotis "Takis" Metaxas is a Professor of Computer Science and Founder of the Media Arts and Sciences Program at Wellesley College.

Dear Readers,

Below are my annotated notes of a talk I gave at Berkman’s Truthiness in Digital Media Symposium a few weeks ago. I introduced the concept of Social Theorems, as a way of formulating the findings of the research that is happening the last few years in the study of Social Media. Continue reading

Seeing the World Through Truth-Colored Glasses

About the Author:

Jim Fingal

Jim Fingal

Jim Fingal is the co-author of the book The Lifespan of a Fact, a book Publishers Weekly describes as “very apropos in our era of spruced-up autobiography and fabricated reporting,” adding that “this is a whip-smart, mordantly funny, thought-provoking rumination on journalistic responsibility and literary license.” He worked several years as a fact-checker and editorial assistant at The Believer and McSweeneys, where he worked on the titlesWhat is the What, Surviving Justice, Voices from the Storm, and others. He currently lives in Cambridge and works as a software developer.

At the Truthiness in Digital Media conference, co-hosted by the Berkman Center for the Internet & Society and MIT’s Center for Civic Media, one fact was eminent — there are a lot of innovative people out there putting together technical resources to make it easier to combat Truthiness and misinformation, in media digital or otherwise. Continue reading

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