VRooMy links

VRM developments

  • List of developers and related projects and people on the ProjectVRM wiki. Please make or send your updates.
  • Phil Windley: Intention Generation: Fuse and VRM. Pull-quotage:Fuse, our connected-car product is an intention generator. Here’s a few examples:
    • When Fuse sees your gas tank is nearly empty it can generate an intention to buy gas.
    • When Fuse indicates it’s time for an oil change or tire rotation, it can generate an intention to have the car serviced.
    • When the vehicle raises a diagnostic code, Fuse can generate an intention to get the car fixed.
    • When insurance is up for renewal, Fuse can generate an intention to solicit quotes for a new policy.
    • Geofences could be linked to intentions.
    • Even a crash, sensed by Fuse’s accelerometers, is an intention to seek emergency services.

    As an intention generator Fuse could be seen as a brand-new way for companies to spy on drivers. But we don’t think it has to be that way. If Fuse is going to generate intentions that can be acted on while preserving owner choice and privacy, it must also provide owners with two things:

    1. A way to see, select, and interact with vendors—both those who the owner has an existing relationship with and those who might be good candidates for future purchases.
    2. A way to use intentions and the make the choices that only the owner can make. For example, when my insurance is due, Fuse needs to ask me if I’m happy with my current insurance before going out to solicit bids.

    Both of these features are about providing owner choice and putting the owner in control. In the terminology of VRM, the thing providing these features is typically called the “4th party” and refers to the system that is acting on the customer’s behalf.

  • Customer Commons Web Pal.
  • Joshua Kopstein in The New Yorker: The mission to decentralize the Internet. Has this line: … average users can create personal clouds to store data that they can access anywhere, without relying on a distant data center owned by Dropbox or Amazon.

Privacy

Business

  • Jamie Smith: Thinking about Moments and Thinking about Context.
  • Karl Bode in Broadband ReportsAT&T Offers $70 1 Gbps in Austin — With a Big Catch. Pull-quote: “The asterisks (**) on the Premiere offer indicates that you must agree to participate in AT&T Internet Preferences behavioral tracking and ad service if you want that price point. Internet Preferences “may use your Web browsing information, like the search terms you enter and the Web pages you visit, to provide you relevant offers and ads tailored to your interests,” says AT&T. That’s a thirty dollar markup from Google Fiber pricing simply for not wanting to have your online activity watched and monetized by AT&T. While Google tracks search history, cookies and GPS location data, AT&T’s Internet Preferences appears to use deep packet inspection (a la Phorm or NebuAD) to monitor each and every packet, including how long you spend on specific websites.
  • Johannes Ernst: There are only three business models.

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